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Travel
Author: Farley Mowat
ISBN: 0770418554
Subcategory: Polar Regions
Publisher Seal Books/Bantam (1980)
Language English
Category: Travel
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 702
ePUB size: 1412 kb
FB2 size: 1820 kb
DJVU size: 1149 kb
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eBook People of the Deer download

by Farley Mowat


Home Farley Mowat People of the Deer. At the time People of the Deer was published, in 1952, it was impossible for me to obtain documentary corroboration for much of the story.

Home Farley Mowat People of the Deer. People of the deer, . The book dealt harshly with the Old Empires of the North-the missions, the RCMP, the trading companies and the federal government-who between them possessed all of the official evidence. I was therefore forced to be somewhat circumspect. Some of the names used had to be pseudonyms.

The People of the Deer were all but gone when this was written and I presume few, if any still exist today. If you've wondered how Mowat became attached to the Northlands and it's people, People of the Deer will show you how it all began. I found it fascinating how much Farley learned from them about 'their' world, even as it was changing (not for the better) around them. This book also introduces us to a people that have all but lost their land and their way of life.

People of the Deer (published in 1952, revised in 1975) is Canadian author Farley Mowat's first book, and brought him literary recognition.

Farley McGill Mowat, OC (May 12, 1921 – May 6, 2014) was a Canadian writer and environmentalist. He achieved fame with the publication of his books on the Canadian north, such as People of the Deer (1952) and Never Cry Wolf (1963).

People of the Deer; by. Mowat, Farley. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by as on September 10, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

People of the Deer book. In 1886, the Ihalmiut people of northern Canada numbered seven thousand; by 1946, when Farley Mowat began his two-year stay in the Arctic, the population had fallen to just forty. With them, he observed for the first time the phenomenon that would inspire him for the rest of his life: the millennia-old migration of the Arctic's caribou herds.

In 1886, the Ihalmiut of northern Canada numbered 7,000 souls; by 1946, when 25-year-old Farley Mowat travelled to the Arctic, their population had dwindled to only 40. Living among them, he observed the millennia-old migration of the caribou and endured the bleak winters, food shortages and continual, devastating intrusions of interlopers bent on exploiting the Arctic. In this seminal book, Mowat details a genocide wrought by misunderstanding and neglect.

The Children After his first outpouring Franz became silent, speaking only in monosyllables and evading the questions that were constantly occurring to me.

Farley Mowat he first night, as a sober man is ashamed of a drunken episode when he has revealed too much of himself to a stranger. Or perhaps he was engrossed only by the delayed arrival of his brother. Each morning he left the cabin to climb the lookout hill near camp where he spent the hot hours of the spring days staring over the rotting surface of the ice-covered bay to the southeast

People of the Deer by Mowat, Farley. Free US Delivery ISBN: 0770422543. Farley mowat 1953 rare people of the deer eskimo book feature caribou migration.

People of the Deer by Mowat, Farley. People of the Deer by Farley Mowat-ExLibrary. Free US Delivery ISBN: 051501821X.

Farley Mowat tells how the Ihalmiut people of the Arctic have struggled since their first contact with the white man. This is an enduring reminder to us all of how western civilization remains aloof to the plight of races it has exploited

Farley Mowat tells how the Ihalmiut people of the Arctic have struggled since their first contact with the white man. This is an enduring reminder to us all of how western civilization remains aloof to the plight of races it has exploited. Poignant and powerful, it should be mandatory reading in all schools and colleges.

Vintage paperback
Kagalkree
When published in 1951 this book was a cry for help - not just to help the Ihalmiut but to help ourselves. A well crafted book of one man's understanding, in a limited way, of the hard, harsh life of the Eskimos who live along side the deer, the lakes, and the spirits of the Barrens. The book is full of his memories, some sad, some wonderful. We get images of summer, with its life, the birds, eggs, and kids going out with toy slings to help gather food. We learn about the way the People lived, worked, and loved inside their families and society. We hear their tales of where they came from, how the animals were brought into the world by a woman, and how dangerous it is for men, both to their body and their soul, when they are all alone. Once there were thousands of them - sharing their tools, enjoying the raw meat of the kill, enjoying the happiness of never needing anything.
Wonderful. Depressing. Sad. Lovely. Is there anything we can still do about this? Is there anything we can do for ourselves?
Perius
This first person account was written in the late 40s and published in 1952. The style is closer to Victorian than modern. Each sentence paints an item, and each paragraph completes a landscape. Don't expect Hemingway. But since I grew up reading everything I could find in bookcases inherited from my grandparents, I enjoy Farley Mowat's style.

This was his first book about the People. The story is sad - so sad that the reader must put down the book every now and then to get back to the present. Mowat wrote a follow-up to the story of the People, "The Desperate People", published in 1959. The style fits our modern age better, but the story of the People gets worse.

Be sure to buy and read both.
GAMER
About 75% of this book is fascinating - specifically the sections that are his firsthand accounts and observations of living with People of the Deer. Mowat isn't a trained historian or cultural anthropologist so the parts where he tries to translate the "People's" myths and legends are a lot less interesting. Also of interest are his biologist's view of the arctic landscape.
FailCrew
I was asked to read this book for a class and while I didn't enjoy it, I found this book to be charming and an altogether good read. It reads like a work of fiction, and definitely conveys stunning and other-worldly environments that seemed to be taken out of a Tolkien novel. I read Kim Stanley Robinson's Mars Trilogy when this book was assigned and I found similarities between the environmental descriptions in those books (especially those in Red Mars) remarkably similar to those found in Mowat's volume. But what makes this book so impressive is that it isn't fiction, but an expression of a reality that, sadly, no longer exists and offers intriguing questions about the state's involvement in the lives of indigenous people. Very good, read it if you get the chance.
asAS
If you've read any of Farley Mowat's books, this one will excite you as much as any of the others. If you've wondered how Mowat became attached to the Northlands and it's people, People of the Deer will show you how it all began. This book also introduces us to a people that have all but lost their land and their way of life.
Heraly
Farley passed away this week. Everyone should read this book and then go to their thinking place for a while.

The book is easily held and pages turn easily which is helpful because my hands were damaged filming a commercial toting the benefits of radial tires for motorized scooters
Shadowbourne
Mowat is passionate about the fate of these people. He writes convincingly. Hard to put the book down.
really like this story