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eBook The Dead and the Gone download
Teen and Young
Author: Susan Beth Pfeffer
ISBN: 0547258550
Subcategory: Literature & Fiction
Pages 336 pages
Publisher Graphia Books; First edition (January 18, 2010)
Language English
Category: Teen and Young
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 755
ePUB size: 1145 kb
FB2 size: 1748 kb
DJVU size: 1681 kb
Other formats: lit mbr mobi txt

eBook The Dead and the Gone download

by Susan Beth Pfeffer


The dead and the gone/Susan Beth Pfeffer. Author's note: The churches, schools, businesses, and hospitals mentioned in. the dead and the gone are all products of my imagination and not intended.

The dead and the gone/Susan Beth Pfeffer. to reflect any real institutions. Nor does the town of Milagro.

Susan Beth Pfeffer The Dead And The Gone A book in the Last Survivors series, 2008 chapter 1 Wednesday, May 18 At the moment when life as he had known it changed forever . The Dead And The Gone. A book in the Last Survivors series, 2008

Susan Beth Pfeffer The Dead And The Gone A book in the Last Survivors series, 2008 chapter 1 Wednesday, May 18 At the moment when life as he had known it changed forever, Alex Morales was behind the counter at Joey's Pizza, slicing a spinach pesto pie into eight roughly equal pieces. It's right here, sir," Alex said. Thanks," the man said. Aren't you Carlos, Luis's kid?" Alex grinned Susan Beth Pfeffer. A book in the Last Survivors series, 2008. chapter 1. Wednesday, May 18.

Susan Beth Pfeffer is the author of many books for teens, including the New York Times best-selling novel Life As. .Don’t get me wrong, The Dead & The Gone was still very good.

Susan Beth Pfeffer is the author of many books for teens, including the New York Times best-selling novel Life As We Knew It, which was nominated for several state awards, and its companion books, The Dead and the Gone, This World We Live In, and The Shade of the Moon. She lives in Middletown, New York. It was interesting to experience everything from a different perspective, in a different location, with different people and be able to compare their individual journeys. But I will admit (SPOILER ALERT) that the Morales’ journey was even more trying and heartbreaking, in the end.

Susan Beth Pfeffer’s Life as We Knew It enthralled and devastated readers with its brutal but hopeful look at an apocalyptic event-an asteroid hitting the moon, setting off . carousel previous carousel next. Author Susan Beth Pfeffer. The Shade of the Moon.

Susan Beth Pfeffer’s Life as We Knew It enthralled and devastated readers with its brutal but hopeful look at an apocalyptic event-an asteroid hitting the moon, setting off a tailspin of horrific climate changes. Now this harrowing companion novel examines the same events as they unfold in New York City, revealed through the eyes of seventeen-year-old Puerto Rican Alex Morales. This World We Live In. Life As We Knew It.

Susan Beth Pfeffer The Dead And The Gone. He didn't get away until ten, later than he usually worked, but the pizza parlor was short staffed, and since Joey-was cranky without his ball game to watch, Alex didn't think it a good idea just to leave.

Alex said to Julie as they walked home from Holy Angels. Every day there were more dead, and the rats were getting larger and more daring. Julie dodged the rat. Every day there were more dead, and the rats were getting larger and more daring re going to do if the sun doesn’t come out soon, she said. She’d better think of something, Alex said. The sun isn’t coming back for a while. I really worry about the string beans, she said. I guess it is summer, she said

Susan Beth Pfeffer’s Life as We Knew It enthralled and devastated readers with its brutal but hopeful look at an apocalyptic event-an asteroid hitting the moon, setting off a tailspin of horrific climate changes. When Alex's parents disappear in the aftermath of tidal waves, he must care for his two younger sisters, even as Manhattan becomes a deadly wasteland, and food and aid dwindle.

Author: Susan Beth Pfeffer. Genre: Young Adult, Speculative Fiction. So it goes without saying that when I discovered its sister book the dead and the gone had been released earlier this year, I wasted no time getting my hands on a copy, eager to see how it would compare

Author: Susan Beth Pfeffer. Stand alone or series: Book 2 of the ‘Moon Crush’ trilogy, but can be read as a stand alone novel. the dead and the gone is the companion novel to book 1 of the trilogy, Life As We Knew It and details the same catastrophic events with different characters, from a different perspective. So it goes without saying that when I discovered its sister book the dead and the gone had been released earlier this year, I wasted no time getting my hands on a copy, eager to see how it would compare. I was not disappointed. the dead and the gone follows seventeen-year-old Alex Morales on the eve of the disaster.

Susan Beth Pfeffer (born February 17, 1948) is a retired American author best known for young adult science fiction

Susan Beth Pfeffer (born February 17, 1948) is a retired American author best known for young adult science fiction. After writing for 35 years, she received wider notice for her series of post-apocalyptic novels, officially titled "The Life As We Knew It Series", but often called "The Last Survivors" or "Moon Crash" series, some of which have appeared on the New York Times Bestselling List.

Susan Beth Pfeffer’s Life as We Knew It enthralled and devastated readers with its brutal but hopeful look at an apocalyptic event—an asteroid hitting the moon, setting off a tailspin of horrific climate changes. Now this harrowing companion novel examines the same events as they unfold in New York City, revealed through the eyes of seventeen-year-old Puerto Rican Alex Morales. When Alex's parents disappear in the aftermath of tidal waves, he must care for his two younger sisters, even as Manhattan becomes a deadly wasteland, and food and aid dwindle.      With haunting themes of family, faith, personal change, and courage, this powerful novel explores how a young man takes on unimaginable responsibilities.

mIni-Like
This book is well-written, and I again enjoyed the overall story. I say “again,” however, because this book is very similar to its predecessor, “Life As We Knew It.” I knew nothing about “The Dead & The Gone” other than that it is the second book in the “Last Survivors” series. When I began reading, I was surprised to discover that this book didn’t pick up where “Life As We Knew It” left off, but instead went back to the beginning and followed a completely different family in New York as they experienced the same struggles that occurred from the ‘shifting’ of the moon. I will openly admit that I was a bit disappointed that I wouldn’t be continuing on with Miranda’s story. I enjoyed reading her thoughts and experiencing what she experienced along with her. When everything ended as well as it could (all things considered) I was hopeful that her journey would continue and things would just keep getting better. Or, at the very least, that things would continue to be difficult, but that we’d still be able to experience that journey along with her.

So imagine my shock when the narrative changed and I was suddenly hearing about Alex Morales. It was a challenge to adjust to an entire new family, as I had felt like I was part of Miranda’s family, having been with them from the start. Even more, it was challenging to start at the very beginning, right after the moon had been struck, knowing all the terrible things that were to come. Don’t get me wrong, “The Dead & The Gone” was still very good. It was interesting to experience everything from a different perspective, in a different location, with different people and be able to compare their individual journeys. But I will admit (SPOILER ALERT) that the Morales’ journey was even more trying and heartbreaking, in the end. Nevertheless, the entire concept upon which this series resides is extremely interesting, and I will most definitely continue reading the remaining books.

On to the next one!
Ximathewi
Book 2 in the Life As We Knew It series. This follows another family during approximately the same time as book one. One of the things that I kept wondering about while I read book one, was, how could other people survive if they weren't as wise as Miranda's mom was? In book one, her mom stockpiled canned goods (enough to last well into winter), and made other very wise decisions to keep her family alive. Book 2, The Dead and the Gone deals with Alex, a 17 year old in New York. When the moon is hit, he is living in New York City with his family. His father was out of the country and presumably dead, and his mother most likely died in the flooding of the subway. He finds himself responsible for his 15 year old sister Bri and his 12 year old sister Julie. They don't stockpile canned goods or do the things that Miranda's family does. He still manages to find ways to survive in the city, and they're not always pleasant to think about. His family is far more religious than Miranda's, at least in expression, so this presented another view point, how they looked to the church for help and what help the church could offer. Overall, I enjoyed the book. Alex's sisters grated on my nerves with their reactions to every thing, including his sister Bri's absolute refusal to believe that her parents were dead, but I suppose it was a realistic portrayal. I look forward to reading book 3.
Nahn
"The Dead and the Gone" is book 2 in a 4-book (so far) series by Susan Beth Pfeffer which she has named "The Last Survivors." I knew from book 1 that the other books in this series would be a treat but I didn't expect Book 2 to be even better than the first. Miranda, the heroine of "Life as We Knew It," is revealed to be very lucky. She comes from a family of four (a mother and three children) all of whom are able to survive in a village in northeast Pennsylvania for ten months. Alex Morales, the hero of "The Dead and the Gone," is part of a family of six (he is the second of four children) living on the Upper West Side in Manhattan of which only three members are alive at the end of the book. The parents drown on the first night, as a result of the very high tides that result from the moon being closer, and the death of one of Alex's siblings (I won't say which one) represents the climax of the book.

New York goes to hell in a handbasket; death rises around the protagonists like one of the super-tides pulled by the moon. The collision that pushes the moon closer to the earth takes place in mid-May. By mid-July bodies are being left on the street in the Upper West Side. The last delivery of emergency rations to that part of Manhattan takes place on December 9. The last day chronicled is December 29, by which time New York is almost completely abandoned, as opposed to Howell, Pennsylvania, which still had between a quarter and a sixth of its pre-collision population the following March. Things are worse for Alex than for Miranda because while her family had an enormous stockpile of food, his must leave the house constantly to get food.

I thought both the role of both violence and religion during a period of social breakdown were depicted more realistically in this book than in the first, which is the reason I give this book a full five stars. Alex's family is deeply religious and their faith sustains them both literally (they are fed at the parochial school they attend) and spiritually. God and His representatives on earth become the only people Alex can talk to about what he is going through, as he tries to protect his sisters from the full implications of what is happening. Alex's first sister rarely leaves the house after an ill-fated attempt to join a convent, but his second sister becomes a target of men with base desires and nothing to lose by fulfilling them. You know society hasn't completely broken down, however, because social class becomes even more important than it previously was, with the rich and well-connected not having to creep past dead bodies all the time in their part of New York (apparently Midtown), foreshadowing the fourth book, in which (the reviews tell us) a rigid caste system has set in in Tennessee.

Book 3, "This World we Live In," brings together the surviving characters from Book 1 and Book 2 and I can't wait to read it. Fortunately, I ordered all of the last three books in the series at the same time from Amazon, so I don't have to. Five stars.
saafari
This is the 2nd installment in this series and though while not quite as great as the previous it definitely holds its own. Alex must step up and be the man of the house and tend to his sister's during this apocalyptic event. His parents are missing and presumably dead while his older brother is away in the military when the moon changes due to A meteor shower and catapults New York City into a fend for yourself survival whirlwind. Living off of small for rations and picking through dead bodies Alex must do what's right for his Family. Will they all survive this nightmare?