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eBook In Search of Robert Millar: Unravelling the Mystery Surrounding Britain’s Most Successful Tour de France Cyclist download
Sport books
Author: Richard Moore
ISBN: 000723502X
Subcategory: Individual Sports
Pages 384 pages
Publisher HarperSport (June 2, 2008)
Language English
Category: Sport books
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 113
ePUB size: 1167 kb
FB2 size: 1148 kb
DJVU size: 1722 kb
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eBook In Search of Robert Millar: Unravelling the Mystery Surrounding Britain’s Most Successful Tour de France Cyclist download

by Richard Moore


He was crowned King of the Mountains during the 1984 Tour de France and remains the only ever Briton to finish on the podium of the world’s toughest race. In attitude and appearance he was unconventional – the young Scot with the tiny stud in his ear who could be prickly, irascible and unapproachable – but to many followers he was the epitome of cool

The Author asserts the moral right to be identified as the author of this work. I can remember, quite clearly, my first encounter with Robert Millar. It was at lunchtime on Saturday, 21 July 1984. I was 11 at the time.

The Author asserts the moral right to be identified as the author of this work.

He was crowned King of the Mountains during the 1984 Tour de France and remains the only ever Briton to finish on the podium of the world's toughest race.

He was crowned King of the Mountains during the The compelling story of Britain's best-ever cyclist, this book looks to unravel the puzzle surrounding his sudden and dramatic disappearance. He was crowned King of the Mountains during the 1984 Tour de France and remains the only ever Briton to finish on the podium of the world's toughest race.

Richard Moore is himself a former racing cyclist, having ridden for Scotland on at least one occasion - this background understanding helps illuminate the book, but (fortunately) does not make this purely a cycling book. Robert Millar was (and remains) a rather inscrutable individual

Richard Moore is himself a former racing cyclist, having ridden for Scotland on at least one occasion - this background understanding helps illuminate the book, but (fortunately) does not make this purely a cycling book. Robert Millar was (and remains) a rather inscrutable individual. Through his career, he was unwilling to court the limelight, preferring his actions on the bike to speak for him. In keeping, he appears to have offered virtually no assistance in the preparation of this book. In attitude and appearance he was unconventional - the young Scot with the tiny stud in his ear who could be prickly, irascible and unapproachable - but to many followers he was the epitome of cool

Flying the flag for British cycling, this one-off original became a cult hero.

Flying the flag for British cycling, this one-off original became a cult hero.

book by Richard Moore. Fully updated with new material on the enigmatic Millar.

A fine portrait of Britain's most successful Tour de France cyclist. I have to give full props to Richard Moore, he is such a complete writer. The author's meticulous but lively book traces Millar's journey from Glasgow's tenements to the Alps and the Pyrenees, in whose company he had few peers. While Robert Millar is the primary focus of the book, the author easily connects him to other important subjects including doping scandals, team tactics, cycling politics and criticisms of the media.

Racing Through the Dark: The Fall and Rise of David Millar. Slaying the Badger: LeMond, Hinault and the Greatest Ever Tour de France (Yellow Jersey Cycling Classics). We Were Young and Carefree: The Autobiography of Laurent Fignon.

The compelling story of Britain's best-ever cyclist - one of the most enigmatic, complex and contradictory athletes in any sport - and the unravelling of the puzzle surrounding his sudden and dramatic disappearance. He was crowned King of the Mountains during the 1984 Tour de France and remains the only ever Briton to finish on the podium of the world's toughest race

The compelling story of Britain’s best-ever cyclist – one of the most enigmatic, complex and contradictory athletes in any sport – and the unravelling of the puzzle surrounding his sudden and dramatic disappearance. Fully updated with new material on the enigmatic Millar.

Cyclist Robert Millar came from one of Europe’s most industrialised cities, Glasgow, to excel in the most unlikely terrain – over the high mountain passes of the Pyrenees and the Alps. He was crowned King of the Mountains during the 1984 Tour de France and remains the only ever Briton to finish on the podium of the world’s toughest race.

In attitude and appearance he was unconventional – the malnourished-looking young Scot with the tiny stud in his ear who could be prickly, irascible and unapproachable – but to many followers he was the epitome of cool. Flying the flag for British cycling, this one-off original became a cult hero.

In Search of Robert Millar will follow the career of this other-worldly character, from his tough childhood on the streets of Glasgow in the 1960s to his move to France and success in the world’s most brutal and unforgiving races, including the controversy surrounding his positive drugs test and his enforced retirement from the sport at the age of 36.

It examines what set Millar apart from all other British cyclists who tried, and failed, to make an impact in this most European of sports, describing his single-mindedness, his eccentricity and the humour and intelligence that emerged only towards the end of his career.

It also proffers explanations for his subsequent disappearance, which repeated a familiar pattern: he vanished from Glasgow and never returned; he left his wife and son and his adopted country, France. Now, it appears, he has turned his back on cycling (amid rumours that he had undergone a sex-change operation).

Through interviews with Millar’s friends, acquaintances, cycling colleagues and ex-classmates, author Richard Moore helps to unravel the mystery of this maverick Scotsman, arguably one of the greatest enigmas in a sport full of remarkable characters.

Mr.mclav
I have found that the best tales come from real life. They are often unexpected, jagged journeys with no clear destination. Robert Millar is an enigmatic personality whose narrow focus and ambition brought him to the top of the cycling world. He never did what was expected of him and always exceeded the odds at those times when others were most dismissive. While Millar is a success story, he is not typical of what many perceive of a cyclist. He was deeply intelligent, calculating, mysterious and determined to enjoy the fruits of his labor without the burdens of fame that so often follow. He is an unlikely hero but a hero none the less.

I have to give full props to Richard Moore, he is such a complete writer. I have read more than 30 books on the sport but Mr. Moore reveals some real gems of insight. While Robert Millar is the primary focus of the book, the author easily connects him to other important subjects including doping scandals, team tactics, cycling politics and criticisms of the media. All of these encompass athletes in a cyclone of pressures and prejudices. This is one of the best cycling books I have yet read. It is also one of the best athlete biographies you will ever find.
Mazuzahn
Overall, i liked the book as it was well-organized and nicely written. It also contains a lot of information for the road cycling enthusiasts of the era. But be aware, the title is misleading! There is not any mystery here, or if it is, the author failed to unravel it. The guy (Robert Millar) just hated getting media attention. That's all. Or at least what i understood. He was also extremely introvert and somewhat asocial. No bad traits at all. Personally, i tend to sympathize such guys. Doing their work, be honest and keep going. Yet, there is not any drama or mystery or intrigue or whatever to ravel out. Meaning that the text becomes boring and the finale somewhat disappointing. I was sceptical of assigning a 3* or a 4*. Better 4* for i bought it in a pretty low price but with some caveats....
Knights from Bernin
I've read many cycling biographies and this one now rates as the best so far. I thought I knew a little bit about Robert Millar. Turns out I knew almost nothing. Incredible story handled deftly and considerately by Richard Moore. Hang on reader, you're in for a ride in the big ring.
Unirtay
All over the place in terms of the story and history, and seems to lack a central theme. Skimmed to the end to find out what he really thinks caused Millar to fall off the map, but there's just more speculation than anything. There's no "unravelling" here...just speculation and a lot of rambling.
The Sinners from Mitar
I found this book fascinating and compelling. I could hardly put it down and devoured it cover to cover. I remember Millar as a boyhood hero of mine. He came to prominence just as the Tour De France began to be televised on British TV. However, I never understood his meticulous attention to detail, particularly his diet and his health. He planned every step up in his career with a very scientific approach and he was so incredibly honest and forthright about his own ability and chances. Millar seems like a visionary now. His insights on toxins and food additives are seen as mainstream now while back in the 80s they made him a freak.

The book provides fascinating insights into many other characters of the cycling scene in the 80s and 90s including Paul Sherwen, Stephen Roche, Sean Yates, Martin Earley, Sean Kelly, Pedro Delgado, Allan Peiper, Graeme Obree, Chris Boardman, even a young Lance Armstrong gets a mention. It also paints quite a horrid picture of the politics of pro cycling and life for riders on the teams back in the 80s. It's amazing to learn how ineffective the management was and to read of truly horrific lack of leadership and the resultant squandered talent.

Millar remains the best ever British pro and the only English speaking rider to win the King of the Mountains in the Tour de France. This book is a fitting tribute to a heavily misunderstood personality whose achievements are only truly being appreciated two decades later. I see Robert Millar in a new light and I'd like to thank Richard Moore for making this possible.
Yozshubei
While the story of Robert Millar's life is interesting, it's mainly a story that makes the reader sad. He's different: so what? He's got quirks: so what? The lying, conniving, headline seeking British press have caused the sporting community to become separated from a man who should instead be respected, not ridiculed.
Reemiel
If you are into cycling history this will be a book for you. Millar is enigmatic and its hard to really paint a good picture of the guy, but Moore does as well as anyone could expect. In some ways it's a shame Millar didn't agree to really open up to him at the end. The book steadily built toward that, but the resolution never came. I guess the more predictable ending wouldn't have fit this subject anyway. Somehow getting some limited email contact and then an abrupt ending seems perfect in that sense.
A good read, always been a fan of Robert Millar and Richard Moore, but somehow felt that it did not quite get to Robert Millar; maybe it isn't possible, thats just how he is, but enjoyed the book anyway.