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Sport books
Author: Dave Dixon
ISBN: 1589804937
Subcategory: Biographies
Pages 224 pages
Publisher Pelican Publishing (February 15, 2008)
Language English
Category: Sport books
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 479
ePUB size: 1946 kb
FB2 size: 1691 kb
DJVU size: 1753 kb
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eBook Saints, the Superdome, and the Scandal, The download

by Dave Dixon


Dave Dixon tells things about the Saints and the Superdome that will surprise everyone. And his scandal is a riveting, fascinating story of how a great Louisiana governor, John J. McKeithen, nearly became president of the United States in 1975.

Dave Dixon tells things about the Saints and the Superdome that will surprise everyone. Dave Dixon, known to die-hard fans and insiders as the "Father of the Saints," gives an unparalleled perspective into the behind-the-scenes efforts to create the sixteenth franchise in the National Football League

Start by marking The Saints, the Superdome, and the Scandal as Want to Read .

Start by marking The Saints, the Superdome, and the Scandal as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Before the Saints were synonymous with New Orleans, Dave Dixon was gathering support to create a "Filled with insider stories about the sports scene of New Orleans and previously untold secret political maneuvers made to bring the Saints to New Orleans. New Orleans Times-Picayune. Dave Dixon offers a behind-the-scenes look at the New Orleans NF. - (LA) The Daily Advertiser. Before the Saints were synonymous with New Orleans, Dave Dixon was gathering support to create a team and build a Superdome to accommodate them.

David Frank Dixon (June 4, 1923 – August 8, 2010) was an American businessman and sports executive who helped create the New Orleans Saints NFL team, the Louisiana Superdome, World Championship Tennis (WCT) and the United States Football League (USFL.

David Frank Dixon (June 4, 1923 – August 8, 2010) was an American businessman and sports executive who helped create the New Orleans Saints NFL team, the Louisiana Superdome, World Championship Tennis (WCT) and the United States Football League (USFL). An alumnus of Tulane University, Dixon created the New Orleans Professional Football Club, In. to lobby for an NFL or an AFL franchise for that city starting in 1962.

David F. Dixon in 1971 with a rendering of the Superdome. When the Saints defeated the Minnesota Vikings in overtime last January at the Superdome en route to their first Super Bowl championship, Mr. Dixon could not attend because of a heart problem. The exemption, backed as well by Russell Long of Louisiana, the Senate Finance Committee chairman, was approved in October 1966, and New Orleans was awarded its . I watched every second of it on television, he told The New York Times, and it was just a great, great experience.

Filled with insider stories about the sports scene of New Orleans and previously untold secret political maneuvers made to bring the Saints to New Orleans

Filled with insider stories about the sports scene of New Orleans and previously untold secret political maneuvers made to bring the Saints to New Orleans. New Orleans Times-Picayune "Dave Dixon offers a behind-the-scenes look at the New Orleans NF. - (LA) The Daily Advertiser Before the Saints were synonymous with New Orleans, Dave Dixon was gathering support to create a team and build a Superdome to accommodate them.

In New Orleans, Dixon would be known as the founder of the Saints and father of the Superdome. Source(s): The Saints, the Superdome and the Scandal by Dave Dixon (c) 2008, Pelican Press. Since Barry above is from New Orleans, I am sure he will confirm it. If you are in New Orleans, libraries and bookstores have it. Anonymous · 1 decade ago. 1.

David Dixon was an American businessman and sports executive who helped create the . Mecom, Dixon became a part owner of the Saints. In 2008, he published an autobiography The Saints, The Superdome, and the Scandal: An Insider"s Perspective.

David Dixon was an American businessman and sports executive who helped create the NFL team, the Louisiana Superdome, World Championship Tennis and th. After signing John Newcombe to a professional contract, Dixon persuaded Cliff Drysdale, Nikki Pilić, Roger Taylor, Tony Roche, Dennis Ralston, Pierre Barthes, and Butch Buchholz, seven of the world"s ten best male tennis players, to turn pro within a few weeks.

Publication, Distribution, et. Gretna, La. September 25, 2006 The birth of a great sports fan Fostering a dream Garnering support from the NFL The New Orleans Saints The Superdome campaign The fight for our dome A tennis interlude President John J. McKeithen Political wisdoms Help from the Times-Picayune Opening the dome Conversion Tulane athletics and Tulane University The United States Football League The Saints' modern era The. final chapter. Personal Name: Dixon, Dave, 1923-. Corporate Name: New Orleans Saints (Football team) History. Corporate Name: Superdome (New Orleans, L. History.

The Saints currently compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a. .He strongly advocated the construction of the Louisiana Superdome in Ne.

The Saints currently compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) South division. The team was founded by John W. Mecom J. David Dixon, and the city of New Orleans on November 1, 1966. The Saints began play in Tulane Stadium in 1967. The National Football League (NFL) is a professional American football league consisting of 32 teams, divided equally between the National Football Conference (NFC) and the American Football Conference (AFC). He strongly advocated the construction of the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans. World Championship Tennis (WCT).

How football came to New Orleans. Before the Saints were synonymous with New Orleans, Dave Dixon was gathering support to create a team and build a Superdome to accommodate them. Offering an insider�s perspective on the historical events that shaped the New Orleans sports scene, Dixon reveals a national political scandal from the late 1960s, which he credits with altering the political landscape of America.

Kinashand
"The Saints, the Superdome, and the Superdome" is a great read, highly informative, and the heart-warming personal memoir of one of New Orleans' greatest visionaries, Dave Dixon. The magnitude of obstacles with which Dixon was faced reminds us how lucky the city is to have the Saints. He was truly the father of professional football in New Orleans and had the foresight to recognize the city needed an NFL team even while the city was pursuing an MLB team. The book reveals Dixon's sports genius and highlights, quite proudly, his efforts in ending segregation at the Tulane Stadium NFL exhibition game in 1965. Dave shows in this book that he was not only a great visionary in sports but in social justice as well.

All in all, I found this book to be an interesting and touching personal account of the formation of the New Orleans Saints. Dave Dixon illuminates the inner workings of professional football in America while still managing to charm us with his charismatic passion for the game.

Highly recommend for all Saints fans and members of the Who Dat Nation.
Lbe
This slim little book is deceptively titled. The author spends little time discussing the Superdome and a lot of time talking about himself. I'm sure the author had to replace the "I" key on his computer. Dave Dixon, a native of New Orleans, spends most of the book naming all of his friends, the politicians he admires, and getting shots in at the people who opposed his grandiose and expensive ideas. As is usual in these "political" autobiographies, the amount of name dropping gets tedious. Still one would think a guy like Dixon would have something to say about how it all started but he's more interested in blowing his own horn. There is hardly any discussion of how the Superdome was financed which might have led to a more interesting discussion of how large sports complexes get built using the taxpayers money. The author seems to be rather sensitive to integrity issues (hardly surprising given his long involvement in Louisiana Democratic Party politics) and often describes some close friend as the most ethical and a person of high integrity. The "Scandal" of the book is so laughable that you have to wonder what his reviewers thought when they read it. Sadly, it had nothing to do with the Superdome or the Saints. The whole tone of the book can be summarized by Mr. Dixon's statement on Edwin Edwards, the scandal-plagued governor who is the poster child of Louisiana's corrupt political system - "What a waste of talent but I liked the guy a lot".

Someday a good investigative reporter, who is not beholden to a political party (which rules out the staff of the local paper), is going to look at the deals that created the Superdome and brought the Saints to New Orleans. That might be a really interesting story. But you won't find it in this book.