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Spirituality
Author: H. D. Bui,Nagasha Beck
ISBN: 0942531477
Publisher Emerald Wave (February 2000)
Language English
Category: Spirituality
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 453
ePUB size: 1478 kb
FB2 size: 1506 kb
DJVU size: 1105 kb
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eBook Cao Dai, Religion of Unity: Out of Many One download

by H. D. Bui,Nagasha Beck


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Cao Dai is a fascinating religion, and this is one evidence of it. It includes a conversation between the spirit of Victor Hugo . CaoDai: Faith of Unity," by Hum Dac Bui with Ngasha Beck, is a nonfiction study of the CaoDai religion, which was founded in Vietnam in the 1920s

Cao Dai is a fascinating religion, and this is one evidence of it. It includes a conversation between the spirit of Victor Hugo and a Cao Dai leader in 1930, illustrations of symbolic hand gestures and other symbols, common prayers and vows, and Hum Dac Bui's presentation of Cao Dai philosophy. In short, it is an incredible primary source. But if you want an outside perspective, look elsewhere. CaoDai: Faith of Unity," by Hum Dac Bui with Ngasha Beck, is a nonfiction study of the CaoDai religion, which was founded in Vietnam in the 1920s. A minibio at the end of the book notes that author Hum Dac Bui was born in Vietnam and came to the .

Caodaism (Vietnamese: Đạo Cao Đài, Chữ nôm: 道高臺) is a monotheistic syncretic religion officially established in the city of Tây Ninh in southern Vietnam in 1926. The full name of the religion is Đại Đạo Tam Kỳ Phổ Độ (The Great Faith Third Universal Redemption). Cao Đài (Vietnamese: (listen), literally the "Highest Lord" or "Highest Power") is the supreme deity, believed by Caodaists to have created the universe

The official name of Cao Dai religion is Dai Dao Tam Ky Pho Do that means "the . The characters Cao Dai probably came from Foreign Biblical Society.

The official name of Cao Dai religion is Dai Dao Tam Ky Pho Do that means "the third Great Universal Religious Amnesty". It will be a period of intense religious activity that will see God and humanity united in ways not yet imagined. The age has now come where God speaks humanity directly. It believes that there could be no further salvation. The religious amalgam is universal among the Vietnamese, its contest varies somewhat from place to place.

Cao Dai (also Caodaism or Caodaiism) is a new religious movement founded in Vietnam. It mixes ideas from other religions. Cao Đài is a syncretic, monotheistic religion officially established in the city of Tây Ninh, southern Vietnam in 1926. The religion combines Buddhism, Christianity, Taoism, Confucianism, and Islam. The full name of the religion is Đại Đạo Tam Kỳ Phổ Độ (great religion of the third period of revelation and salvation).

CaoDai, a Faith of Unity discusses the oneness between God, human beings and the universe . Books related to Caodai, Faith of Unity.

CaoDai, a Faith of Unity discusses the oneness between God, human beings and the universe, including religions. If human beings realize the oneness between God, human beings, and religions, the world may achieve harmony.

MARK BEN FORD
Dr. Bui is the first Vietnamese-American to try to explain the tenets of his new syncretistic religion to the wider English reading public, and he was written this along with an American disciple, Ngasha Beck. Their account is clear and sets out may aspects of this spiritist religion, born in French Indochina in 1926 and brought to the United States by Vietnamese refugees forced to flee their homeland after 1975. Caodaism preached gender equality, racial harmony and religious tolerance in the early 20th century, and the religion has had a long history of persecution by the French, the Diem government and the present communist regime. Its disciples have endured exile, re-education camps, government censorship and many restrictions, but have courageously rebuilt their religion in a new land. Much of Caodaist philosophy is reminiscent of other more recent efforts to blend Buddhism and Christianity (like Thich Nhat Hahn), and many of its teachings (reincarnation, meditation, self-correction and vegetarianism) are now familiar parts of New Age spirituality. But Vietnam's tragic history has put in a unique place to offer lessons in peace to the world, and until now these lessons were not available to the general public.
Bloodfire
This beautiful book provides a wide background on the basic ideas of the religion of CaoDai, including meditation techniques and spiritual practices, from CaoDai Overseas representatives Hum D. Bui and Ngasha Beck. This is an excellent first book of this pacifist religion founded in a country known, unfortunately, for its own struggles against violence and hate. Truly inspiring, and a contribution to world reconciliation and peace!