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eBook Tracing Boards of Three Degrees in Craft Freemasonry Explained download
Spirituality
Author: Julian Rees
ISBN: 0853183341
Subcategory: Other Religions Practices & Sacred Texts
Pages 96 pages
Publisher Lewis Masonic (December 20, 2009)
Language English
Category: Spirituality
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 203
ePUB size: 1482 kb
FB2 size: 1512 kb
DJVU size: 1569 kb
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eBook Tracing Boards of Three Degrees in Craft Freemasonry Explained download

by Julian Rees


Freemasonry is about rendering in symbol and allegory that which words alone cannot render.

Freemasonry is about rendering in symbol and allegory that which words alone cannot render. And a visual image gives us a way of using our own insight to decode the message  . In a sense, this book is written back-to-front; Julian Rees examines the three Craft tracing boards first, laying out the allegories and symbols, then, as an adjunct, the Author takes a short look at the history of their development, looking at some older forms of the tracing boards in use long before the present-day Emulation boards were developed. After that the book looks at practices in other Masonic jurisdictions and other countries.

If You are interested in masonry and if You want to find profound informtion about tracing boards, then this book is just the one You need. One person found this helpful.

Julian Rees - Freemasonry. Freemasonry is a multifaceted thing.

Freemasonry is a multifaceted thing. On one level it seems to many of us to be all about words, learning the ritual, getting the words right, putting the right meaning into what we are saying, and so on.

Julian Rees was born in 1936 and after attending St Paul’s School in London he. .See if your friends have read any of Julian Rees's books.

Julian Rees was born in 1936 and after attending St Paul’s School in London he served in the Royal Army Education Corps in Berlin  . Julian Rees’s Followers (5). Julian Rees. Julian Rees isn't a Goodreads Author (yet), but they do have a blog, so here are some recent posts imported from their feed.

Although most Freemasons will be familiar with the Tracing Boards - painted or engraved illustrations developed in the early years of Freemasonry which are used in Lodges to illustrate Masonic symbols and allegories during degree ceremonies and lectures - little has been published on them. The Tracing Boards are an essential part of the three Craft Degrees, assisting the Freemason in his quest to decode and interpret those allegories.

Haunch's book, "Tracing Boards: Their Development and their Designers", has been in print for over 40 years but is primarily an historical treatise. The Tracing Boards are an essential part of the three Craft Degrees in the way they illustrate the allegories and symbols used

Haunch's book, "Tracing Boards: Their Development and their Designers", has been in print for over 40 years but is primarily an historical treatise. The Tracing Boards are an essential part of the three Craft Degrees in the way they illustrate the allegories and symbols used. There is no publication which adequately explains the Tracing Boards, their use and the meaning of their symbolism, and this book fills that gap in the market

Evolution Julian Rees - Freemasonry Posted on February 3, 2019 by Julian ReesFebruary 3, 2019 It is, let us say, the month of May. The tulips are a little past their best, but if you look straight into the flower there is an amazing symmetry.

Julian Rees - Freemasonry Posted on August 28, 2001 by Julian . In this wonderfully illustrated book Julian Rees explores the tracing boards of the three Craft degrees.

Julian Rees - Freemasonry Posted on August 28, 2001 by Julian ReesSeptember 5, 2015. Tracing Boards of the Three Degrees in Craft Masonry Explained. There is no publication which adequately explains the Tracing Boards, their use and the meaning of their symbolism, and this book fills that gap in the market. He explains all the symbolism within each Board and the meaning that this symbolism conveys to Freemasons.

Although all Freemasons will be familiar with the Tracing Boards (painted or printed boards developed in the early years of Freemasonry, which are used in Lodges to illustrate Masonic symbols during lectures) little has been published on them

Although all Freemasons will be familiar with the Tracing Boards (painted or printed boards developed in the early years of Freemasonry, which are used in Lodges to illustrate Masonic symbols during lectures) little has been published on them. The book gives a history of the development and use of Tracing Boards, and concentrates on explaining the role of the Tracing Boards in the First, Second, and Third Degrees, and the specific symbolism of the Board used for each. Detailed descriptions of the Boards are given, particularly those used in the three degrees by the Emulation Lodge of Improvement, known as the Harris Boards, which contain the elements of most of the Tracing Boards used in lodges throughout Britain. The book is attractively illustrated to show the variety of historical and colorful Tracing Boards used throughout the world.
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Excerpt from the review by Shawn Eyer in Ahiman: A Review of Masonic Culture and Tradition, Volume 1:

Every now and then a new book will appear that we know, almost instantly, will enjoy a place in the top ten list of books that we recommend to newly made Freemasons. Julian Rees, a well-known English Masonic author, has produced such a work in this important new book on the tracing boards'--'a subject of great interest to all students of the meaning and development of the Craft's symbolism.

This is a volume long needed. While American Masons often enjoy seeing the occasional reproduction of tracing boards in various media, too commonly we have failed to actually study them in depth. This is a shame, because, with few exceptions, the images on the tracing boards apply just as readily to our contemplations as to the reflections of our brethren in England and in other lands where such boards are commonly used.

There is a popular misconception that the tracing boards are mere devices meant to assist us in the ritualistic performance of the memorized lectures. While these images may be very helpful as mnemonic tools, Rees traces the real origins of the tracing boards to some of the most essential psychological needs of man, most importantly the urge to create "in a form comprehensible to his fellow men'.'.'.'images that would assist him in devotion to the deity." Thus, within Freemasonry, the boards serve to help us better convey the inner meaning of the ritual.

After reminding us that there exist eighteenth century records that describe initiates studying drawings made directly on the lodge room floor (which were, due to their esoteric nature, washed away immediately after the temple was closed), Rees reveals his view of the important role the tracing boards can play: "Freemasonry is about rendering in symbol and allegory that which words alone cannot render. And a visual image gives us a way of using our own insight to decode the message. The tracing boards are there to do just that--from their original function of laying out the plan of the building, they have developed into a means for us to lay out the message, and then to profit by it."

In order that the reader might so profit, the book features good reproductions (mostly in color) of eighty-one tracing boards, in addition to some supporting illustrations. Several of the boards are reproduced at a large size, nearly filling the page. The majority are given in smaller dimensions, but the halftone quality is generally clear enough for us to study the details. The excellent artistic value of the book is complimented by Julian Rees' insightful commentary upon the three Craft tracing boards. These essays are concise but sophisticated, and possess the kind of flexibility and depth of thought that is clearly the result of many decades' exploration of the Craft rituals.

Tracing Boards of the Three Degrees in Craft Freemasonry Explained is a book that many in the Craft have looked forward to. By bringing to life the rich iconography of this critical part of our material culture, Julian Rees has enabled a new generation of Freemasons to gain insight into their traditions and the development thereof. Thanks to Rees, American Masons need no longer admire the tracing boards from afar.
Tehn
I've always been interested in the symbolism within Freemasonry and I've always liked the different tracing boards. This book did more than explain the boards and their symbolism but the illustrations are truly magnificent. The book is well written and describes tracing board history from the time of impermanent drawings on the floor of the lodge to the works of art we have now. The illustrations of the long forgotten boards alone is worth having the book.
Being a Bro. who is unafraid to tell the world that I am a Freemason I have this book and others on full view for all to see. This is the one that provokes the most interest and discussion.
Shezokha
Julian Reese, in his "Tracing Boards of the Three Degrees, has presented a collage of colours and diversity. Presenting in colour and art the Masonic tracing boards over the years past and present.
Like so many authors on Masonic subjects there is a tendency through the United Kingdom, Europe and USA, as though that was the only places the teaching chart was used.
Syleazahad
Awesome book. Very informative.
Gaeuney
Beautiful, fun to page through, and filled with great information.
Xirmiu
Nicely done
Whitegrove
Simple to understand & easy to read.
Well written book.
Excellent illustrations. Good general information. You won't get any "secrets" but, you will see some fine examples of Masonic tracing boards.