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eBook Ideals and Realities of Islam download
Spirituality
Author: Seyyed Hossein Nasr
ISBN: 0042970490
Subcategory: Islam
Pages 192 pages
Publisher Harpercollins (October 31, 1985)
Language English
Category: Spirituality
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 231
ePUB size: 1874 kb
FB2 size: 1503 kb
DJVU size: 1719 kb
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eBook Ideals and Realities of Islam download

by Seyyed Hossein Nasr


Seyyed Hossein Nasr dominates his subject. Still the best introduction to, well, the ideals and realities of Islam. Written with clarity and heart by one of the finest scholars alive today

Seyyed Hossein Nasr dominates his subject. he unites in his person an Islamic structure which encompassed two points of view: that of religious law and contemplation, and a supreme knowledge of modern scientific methods. From the Preface by Titus Burckhardt. Seyyed Hossein Nasr was born in Tehran to a family of traditional scholars and physicians. Written with clarity and heart by one of the finest scholars alive today. Highly recommend for college - our class had it as textbook in religious Studies and it was the highlight of our discussion.

Nasr, Seyyed Hossein - Ideals and Realities of Islam (2000) (Scan, OCR) abbyy. Nasr, Seyyed Hossein - Islam and the Plight of Modern Man 2nd (2001) abbyy. Nasr, Seyyed Hossein - Islam, Religion History and Civilization (2003) abbyy.

One of the books read for the class was Nasr's Ideals and Realities of Islam, the first book I'd ever read entirely devoted to Islam. Nasr also Seyyed Hossein Nasr was born on April 7, 1933 (19 Farvadin 1312 . solar) in Tehran into a family of distinguished scholars and physicians. I suspect the department had us read it on the correct assumption that most of the students, like myself, were pretty ignorant of this, one of the two greatest religions "of the book. His father, Seyyed Valiallah, a man of great learning and piety, was a physician to the Iranian royal family, as was his father before him.

Ideals and Realities of Islam (1966). Seyyed Hossein Nasr. Gifford Lecture Series - Lectures/Books". Science and Civilization in Islam, with a preface by Giorgio de Santillana (1968). Islamic Studies: Essays on Law and Society, the Sciences, and Philosophy and Sufism (1967). Mozaffari, A. (2010). Inscribing a Homeland: Iranian Identity and the pre-Islamic and Islamic Collective Imaginations of Place.

Seyyed Hossein Nasr does a good job at showing Islam in comparative terms, in a manner that . This might be a bit difficult to come by, but in a time when it really pays to understand the major points and ideals of Islam, this is a book that deserves to be read and studied

Seyyed Hossein Nasr does a good job at showing Islam in comparative terms, in a manner that those more familiar with other religious constructs (particularly Judaism and Christianity) will find intelligible. There are six major sections - the first addresses Islam in general, placing it historically and philosophically as a universal religion as well as a particular religion, a primordial religion as well as the 'last' of the religions. This might be a bit difficult to come by, but in a time when it really pays to understand the major points and ideals of Islam, this is a book that deserves to be read and studied. A classic for understanding the heart of Islam.

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The present book contains six lectures out of a series of fifteen public lectures delivered by Dr. Nasr during the time he held the chair of Aga Khan Professor of Islamic Studies in the American University of Beirut (1964-65). These public lectures concern the religion of Islam and the diverse aspects of the civilization it produced. Ideals and Realities of Islam" has been primarily written for those Western readers who are interested in Islam.

Ideals and Realities of Islam is a book written by Seyyed Hossein Nasr, one among prominent modern Muslim scholars. Nasr invites us to fathom Islam with its spacious dimensions. He explains subjects on which Islam must focus for fourteen centuries of its journey. The book consists of his lecture compilation at The American University, Beirut. Consisting of six chapters, Nasr lays out about Islam and Muslims nowadays. In addition, he also reveals the various thoughts in Islam. Both in Sufism, a common spiritual journey undertaken by the mystics, as well as in Sharia, the legal boundaries that must be obeyed by Muslims.

Harvard University Press, 1964. Ideals and realities of Islam. SH Nasr, T Burckhardt, H Smith. Allen and Unwin, 1975.

It is written for the Western reader interested in Islam and also for the Western-educated Muslim.

Corner of cover creased, bookseller's marks, some marking to tanned page edges. Shipped from the U.K. All orders received before 3pm sent that weekday.
Kalv
Still the best introduction to, well, the ideals and realities of Islam. Written with clarity and heart by one of the finest scholars alive today. Highly recommend for college - our class had it as textbook in religious Studies and it was the highlight of our discussion. Fine entre into the true meanings of this rich and inclusive religion.
Yadon
Very clear explanations of Islamic religion from the perspective of a Muslim advocate. This book is a retort to Western criticisms of Islam. It wasn't always as clear as it could be from a neutral perspective.
Jwalextell
Some twenty-five years ago, I had my first real exposure to the teachings of Islam, through the gentle teachings of my professor Victor Danner and this text by Seyyed Hossein Nasr. As the introduction states, there are few books in English which treat Islam from its own point of view. The two primary audiences are Westerners who wish to know something about Islam, both in ideal and in practice, as well as the Muslim who has received Western education.
The chapters of this book each derive from lectures delivered at the American University in Beruit back in the 1960s; while one might think that this makes the text dated, this would be incorrect. Much in the way that the basic core of Christianity remains remarkably constant despite the progress of culture, so too does the heart of Islam. One of the interesting observations of the author is that Islam faces the same kind of modern crisis as Christianity, in that the younger generation has lost touch with the religion and faith of their ancestors; while this is particularly true in Muslim countries with Western educational models, it is increasingly true in other parts of the world, as many become 'cultural Muslims', but not religious Muslims.
Seyyed Hossein Nasr does a good job at showing Islam in comparative terms, in a manner that those more familiar with other religious constructs (particularly Judaism and Christianity) will find intelligible. There are six major sections -- the first addresses Islam in general, placing it historically and philosophically as a universal religion as well as a particular religion, a primordial religion as well as the 'last' of the religions. The second explores the Quran (Koran), its development and place in Islam, the difficulties inherent in translation and interpretation, and the three main types of literature contained within the Quran. The third addresses the prophet himself, Mohammad, his life and history, as well as the development of his image and legacy beyond his life time. The fourth section is on the Shariah, or divine law, its derivation from the Quran and development over time. The fifth looks at Tariqah, Sufiism and the mystical side of Islam. Finally, the author looks at the major division of the Sunnite and Shiite groupings, some of the major contrasts as well as the similarities.
The book has a wonderful spirit about it -- perhaps ironically for me, given my mystic and spirituality interests, the chapter that touched me most was that on the Shariah, the divine law, and made me for a time wish to study very deeply into the complexities and schools of Shariah, and develop the author's parallel he draws with the Talmud.
This might be a bit difficult to come by, but in a time when it really pays to understand the major points and ideals of Islam, this is a book that deserves to be read and studied.
Gorisar
Some twenty-five years ago, I had my first real exposure to the teachings of Islam, through the gentle teachings of my professor Victor Danner and this text by Seyyed Hossein Nasr. As the introduction states, there are few books in English which treat Islam from its own point of view. The two primary audiences are Westerners who wish to know something about Islam, both in ideal and in practice, as well as the Muslim who has received Western education.

The chapters of this book each derive from lectures delivered at the American University in Beruit back in the 1960s; while one might think that this makes the text dated, this would be incorrect. Much in the way that the basic core of Christianity remains remarkably constant despite the progress of culture, so too does the heart of Islam. One of the interesting observations of the author is that Islam faces the same kind of modern crisis as Christianity, in that the younger generation has lost touch with the religion and faith of their ancestors; while this is particularly true in Muslim countries with Western educational models, it is increasingly true in other parts of the world, as many become 'cultural Muslims', but not religious Muslims.

Seyyed Hossein Nasr does a good job at showing Islam in comparative terms, in a manner that those more familiar with other religious constructs (particularly Judaism and Christianity) will find intelligible. There are six major sections -- the first addresses Islam in general, placing it historically and philosophically as a universal religion as well as a particular religion, a primordial religion as well as the 'last' of the religions. The second explores the Quran (Koran), its development and place in Islam, the difficulties inherent in translation and interpretation, and the three main types of literature contained within the Quran. The third addresses the prophet himself, Mohammad, his life and history, as well as the development of his image and legacy beyond his life time. The fourth section is on the Shariah, or divine law, its derivation from the Quran and development over time. The fifth looks at Tariqah, Sufiism and the mystical side of Islam. Finally, the author looks at the major division of the Sunnite and Shiite groupings, some of the major contrasts as well as the similarities.

The book has a wonderful spirit about it -- perhaps ironically for me, given my mystic and spirituality interests, the chapter that touched me most was that on the Shariah, the divine law, and made me for a time wish to study very deeply into the complexities and schools of Shariah, and develop the author's parallel he draws with the Talmud.

This might be a bit difficult to come by, but in a time when it really pays to understand the major points and ideals of Islam, this is a book that deserves to be read and studied.
Auau
This book is, if you read enough of them, which thanks god he has written plenty, you can tell by Sayyid Nasr. It has logic built in to it.Main topic is response to Orientalist in their effort to minimize Islam and reduce it to just a Arab custom. Nasr responds to all their claims(may be not all there are so many)and seems to me that he bases all his responses on the idea that Orientalist do not belive Islam being a God given religion. He shows that when they attack Islam they use the arguments that say not having a good logical foundation but in turn they use same arguments in their own religion as fundemantel concepts. As Nasr puts it,He is ready to accept these claims from idolaters but not from the people of the book, for we all have the same fundemantel beliefs about how religions are revealed. All religions are based on some sort of belief and I believe even the quran states that this book is for believers who believe in unseen. What makes Islam better than others is for me that it has more reason and concept built into it.