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eBook The Upanishads: Breath of the Eternal download
Spirituality
Author: Frederick Manchester,Swami Prabhavananda
ISBN: 0451620607
Subcategory: Hinduism
Publisher Signet; 2nd Edition edition (April 1, 1957)
Language English
Category: Spirituality
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 934
ePUB size: 1712 kb
FB2 size: 1317 kb
DJVU size: 1178 kb
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eBook The Upanishads: Breath of the Eternal download

by Frederick Manchester,Swami Prabhavananda


Book Source: Digital Library of India Item 2015. author: Swami,prabhavananda d. ate.

Book Source: Digital Library of India Item 2015. te: 2012-08-00 d. citation: 1947 d. dentifier. origpath: 399 d. copyno: 1 d.

More by Swami Prabhavananda. Religion in Practice. The Spiritual Heritage of India. Memories of a Loving Soul.

The Upanishads - Breath of the Eternal Author: Swami Prabhavananda . The Principal Upanishads (Hardcover) by Swami Sivananda There is no book in the whole world that is so thrilling, soul stirring and inspiring as the Upanishads

The Upanishads - Breath of the Eternal Author: Swami Prabhavananda; Journey of the Upanishads to the West Author: Tathagatananda; The wisdom of the Hindus Author: Brian Brown . The Principal Upanishads (Hardcover) by Swami Sivananda There is no book in the whole world that is so thrilling, soul stirring and inspiring as the Upanishads. The philosophy taught by the Upanishads has been the source of solace for many both in east and the west. The Upanishads teach the philosophy of absolute unity. They contain the sublime truth of vedanta and practical hints and clues which throw much light on the pathway of self realisation.

translated by Swami Prabhavananda and Frederick Manchester. The Upanishads reflect pure Vedanta, the highest aspect of spiritual truth

translated by Swami Prabhavananda and Frederick Manchester. xxiv plus 197 pages, US paperback 0-87481-040-X. xxiv plus 197 pages, US hardback 0-87481-659-9. The Upanishads reflect pure Vedanta, the highest aspect of spiritual truth. There are no personal Gods, no Christ, Rama, Krishna, or Ramakrishna. The teachings are very ancient, back from before the written word.

by Swami Prabhavananda (Author), Frederick Manchester (Author). The Upanishads reflect pure Vedanta. the highest aspect of spiritual truth. Here are few verses: "The Power behind every activity of nature and of man is the power of Brahman. to realize this truth is to be immortal.

THE UPANISHADS - Breath of the Eternal. Translated by Swami Prabhavananda and Frederick Manchester. New York: Signet Classics, 2002 (1948). Paperback, 128 pages.

Items related to The Upanishads: Breath of the Eternal. Books for Inner Development

Items related to The Upanishads: Breath of the Eternal. translated by Swami Prabhavananda; and Frederick Manchester The Upanishads: Breath of the Eternal. ISBN 13: 9780874810400. Books for Inner Development. Swami Prabhavananda was the founder of the Vedanta Society of Southern California and is best known for his many translations of the Hindu/Vedanta classics including:How to Know God: The Yoga Aphorisms of Patanjali,The Bhagavad Gita: The Song of God, Shankara's Crest Jewel of Discrimination, and Narada's Way of Divine Love: The Bhakti Sutras.

The Upanishads reflect pure Vedanta. There are no personal Gods, no Christ, Rama, Krishna, or Ramakrishna has been added to your Cart. The Rishis, whose insights they embody remain wholly in the background, impersonal as the truth they stood for, their individual lives lost forever, with even their names lost in the dark backward and abysm of time has been added to your Cart.

Swami Prabhavananda, Frederick Manchester.

Start by marking The Upanishads: Breath of the Eternal as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Swami Prabhavananda, Frederick Manchester.

DireRaven
The literal meaning of upanishad, "sitting near devotedly" brings picturesquely to mind an earnest disciple learning from his teacher. The word also means "secret teaching"; or as Shankara said "knowledge that destroys the bonds of ignorance and leads to the supreme goal of freedom."

In this book, the author shares 12 Upanishads: Isha, Kena, Katha, Prasna, Mundaka, Mandukya, Taiittiriya, Aitreya, Chandogya, Brihadaranyaka, Swetasvatara, Kaivalya.

Here are few verses:

"The Power behind every activity of nature and of man is the power of Brahman. to realize this truth is to be immortal."

"Through knowledge of Brahman (Self) comes power. Through knowledge of Brahman comes victory over death."

"The secret of immortality is to be found in purification of the heart, in meditation, in realization of the identity of the Self within and Brahman without. For immortality is simply union with God."

"The Self is not known through study of the scriptures, nor through subtlety of the intellect, nor through much learning. But by him who longs for him is he known. Verily unto him does the Self reveal his true being."

"Soundless, formless, intangible, undying, tasteless, odorless, eternal, without beginning, without end, immutable, beyond nature, is the Self. Knowing him as such, one is freed from death."

"What is within is also without. What is without is also within. He who sees difference between what is within and what is without goes evermore from death to death."

"He is the one light that gives light to all. He shining, everything shines."

"None beholds him with the eyes, for he is without visible form. Yet in the heart is he revealed, through self-control and meditation. those who know him become immortal.

"When all the senses are stilled, when the mind is at rest, when the intellect wavers not - that, say the wise, is the highest state."

"The Self is the goal of knowledge. Know him and go beyond death."
Kabandis
I bonded with this book...or rather with this translation. I read parts of other translations of The Upanishads but found this one resonated like no other. I believe this might be just my own subjective experience but nonetheless it happened.
Flamekiller
According to the Hindus, we are currently approaching the end of the last and darkest of four 2,400 years cycles, the "Kali Yuga". This age is "dark" in terms of the lack of virtue and understanding and appreciation for the profound wisdom contained in the ancient texts that make up the Upanishads. This is why I doubt that anything I could say would prompt you to download and read this most precious book!

The Upanishads are truly meant for those who have "ears to hear and eyes to see". If you feel that you are one of these, this book could prove to be an excellent introduction to what could truly be called a vital portion the "wisdom of the ages".

Like all of Swami Pravananda's translations, this is expertly edited and quite readable.

Another favorite of mine is: http://www.amazon.com/How-Know-God-Aphorisms-Patanjali-ebook/dp/B001F7BE5C
Reggy
THE UPANISHADS - Breath of the Eternal. Translated by Swami Prabhavananda and Frederick Manchester. New York: Signet Classics, 2002 (1948). Paperback, 128 pages. ISBN 978045158483

The fact that after over sixty years this magical translation, first published in 1948, is still in print testifies to its continuing popularity. After a 1-page Preface and a brief Introduction of just 3 pages, it gives us the texts of nine Upanishads along with selections from three others.

Each of the Upanishads is preceded by a brief 'argument' of just a few lines which the Preface tells us is there simply to indicate "dominant themes." Footnotes are sparse, and there is no Bibliography or Index. In short, only the essentials have been given so that there is nothing to stand between the reader and his or her experience of the texts. And it works!

I'm not really sure how they did it but Prabhavananda and Manchester have succeeded brilliantly in capturing the magic of these texts. With some editions it can be a relief to finally reach the end of an Upanishad. Here, my own experience is that on reaching the end I immediately want to go back to the beginning and re-read the whole thing.

I think that for many if not most readers, the Prabhavananda and Manchester edition is all they will ever want or need. For others it will provide an excellent preparation for tackling the more complex editions of Radhakrishnan, Swami Nikhilananda, and Swami Gambhirananda (full details of which will be found in my Listmania list on the Upanishads).

But there's no doubt at all that, whether you are of the "simplest is best" school or a lover of complexity, the Prabhavananda and Manchester translation provides the finest possible entry into the Upanishads and you should consider yourself lucky to have found it.
Flamehammer
I was introduced to the Upanishads, Veda and Vedanta in another book by Arthur Schopenhauer and was curious about how it may have had an effect on a thinker in Europe whose works have enlightened many people. As I tried to learn about Upanishads, I was confused and had to find a proper intro to the subject.

First I read The Bhagavad Gita by Eknath Easwaran. Now I understand the Upanishads should have been the first to read.

I am not that knowledgeable to asses this specific edition since the translation from sanskrit varies in many editions.

Nevertheless I found it easy to read and understand and was really surprised to see the same ideas in other scriptures. As a last note be advised some ideas repeat on and on. For myself it was a good introduction...