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Science
Author: Dr Donald E. Johnson
ISBN: 1439228620
Subcategory: Evolution
Pages 132 pages
Publisher BookSurge Publishing; F First Edition Used edition (November 2, 2010)
Language English
Category: Science
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 421
ePUB size: 1620 kb
FB2 size: 1520 kb
DJVU size: 1673 kb
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eBook Probability's Nature and Nature's Probability : A Call to Scientific Integrity download

by Dr Donald E. Johnson


Probability's Nature and. has been added to your Cart. Dr. Johnson focuses a lot on probability issues and the source of information. The book is easy to read and offers a large number of thoughts worth ruminating about

Probability's Nature and. The book is easy to read and offers a large number of thoughts worth ruminating about. The book illustrates the advantages and pitfalls of self-publishing. On the one hand, the price is unbeatable and was brought to market quickly.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Donald E. Johnson holds two P. s, one in Chemistry from Michigan State University and another in Computer & Information Sciences from the University of Minnesota. Start by marking Probability's Nature And Nature's Probability: A Call To Scientific Integrity as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Served as president and technical expert in an independent computer consulting firm for many years.

This is the sequel to the well received "Probability's Nature And Nature's Probability which was written in depth for Scientist and Professionals. This new book has the same wonderful foundation, but has been revised and put into layman's terms so anyone can understand it. The author once believed anyone not accepting the "proven" evolutionary scenario that was ingrained d This is the sequel to the well received "Probability's Nature And Nature's Probability which was written in depth for Scientist and Professionals.

You should come here when we have our resident statistician skeptic, Prof.

My question to readers: how many scientists have to reject Darwinism before there is a scientific controversy ? Post navigation. Canadian science minister vs. the puff dino suits: A story with, um, legs? Dogs more like humans than chimpanzees are? 32 Replies to Probability’s Nature and Nature’s Probability–Don Johnson. You should come here when we have our resident statistician skeptic, Prof.

Probability Nature and Nature’s Probability also introduces the fossil evidence for design, irreducible complexity, and discusses junk-DNA in various sections. Johnson closes by explaining the importance of preserving academic freedom to follow the evidence wherever it leads. I don’t necessarily agree with everything that Johnson writes, but his book is succinct enough and lucid enough on so many important ID topics that I would recommend it as an introduction to ID. As Johnson writes in his closing chapter: The benefits of an ID model are potentially wide-ranging.

Items related to Probability's Nature and Nature's Probability. The original 2009 book was updated in November 2010 to include most of the material in my newest book, "Programming of Life," as well as new discoveries since originally written (over 50 references from 2010)

Items related to Probability's Nature and Nature's Probability. Dr Donald E. Johnson Probability's Nature and Nature's Probability : A Call to Scientific Integrity. ISBN 13: 9781439228623. The original 2009 book was updated in November 2010 to include most of the material in my newest book, "Programming of Life," as well as new discoveries since originally written (over 50 references from 2010). See scienceintegrity.

Probability's Nature and Nature's Probability : A Call to Scientific Integrity. The book deals with the empirical and probabilistic aspects of science, examining many widely accepted undirected natural scenarios, comparing their scientific validity to that of intelligent design. by Donald E. Johnson and Timothy Johnson.

A Call to Scientific Integrity. Don Johnson is a Ph D Chemist with also a PhD in Computer and Information Sciences

A Call to Scientific Integrity. Don Johnson is a Ph D Chemist with also a PhD in Computer and Information Sciences. He writes in compact fashion, the kind of style you might expect from a scientist. My second impression was that the book is a goldmine of quotes - he has really read a lot of stuff, and has compact collections of relevent quotes, sort of like "data bursts" of quotes.

On this episode of ID the Future, Casey Luskin interviews scientist Donald Johnson about his new book, Probability’s Nature and Nature’s Probability. Johnson calls for scientific integrity in the debate over evolution and intelligent design and discusses how information is transmitted in living systems. Continue reading →. Posted in Audio, Center for Science and Culture, Culture and Ethics, Evolution, Intelligent Design, Intelligent Design the Future, Science Tagged Casey Luskin, Donald Johnson, Probabilty's Nature and Nature's Probability, scientific integrity.

Probabilistic causation is a concept in a group of philosophical theories that aim to characterize the relationship between cause and effect using the tools of probability theory. The central idea behind these theories is that causes raise the probabilities of their effects, all else being equal. Interpreting causation as a deterministic relation means that if A causes B, then A must always be followed by B. In this sense, war does not cause deaths, nor does smoking cause cancer.

Nov, 2010 update (including 52 2010 references) of Mar, 2009 original. The author once believed anyone not accepting the "proven" scenarios for chemical and biological evolution that were ingrained during his science education had the same mentality as someone believing in a flat earth. With continued scientific investigation, paying closer attention to actual data (rather than speculative conclusions), he began to doubt the natural explanations that had been so ingrained in a number of key areas including the origin and fine-tuning of mass and energy, the origin of life with its complex functional information, and the increase in functional complexity in living organisms. It was science, and not religion, that caused his disbelief in the explanatory powers of undirected nature using scientific-sounding concepts that in fact have no known scientific basis. Scientific integrity needs to be restored so that ideas that have no methods to test or falsify are not considered part of science. Too often "possible" is used by scientists without considering that "possible" has a scientific definition within the nature of probability. For example, one should not be able to get away with stating "it is possible that life arose from non-life by ..." or "it's possible that a different form of life exists elsewhere in the Universe" without first demonstrating that it is indeed possible (non-zero probability) using known science. This book reviews the many prevalent scenarios that are widely accepted, but need closer examination of their scientific validity. It will also examine the scientific validity of Intelligent Design (ID) as a model that can be empirically detected and examined. For example, the book uses known science (including Shannon, functional, and prescriptive information principles) to prove that it is impossible (zero probability) for life's complex information system, with thousands of interacting computers in each cell, to have an undirected natural source. The usefulness of the ID model for furthering scientific inquiry is also analyzed. One chapter is devoted to exposing fallacies, presuppositions, and beliefs that attempt to prevent acceptance of ID as "science."
Quamar
This is a review specifically of the e-book version and is not a critique of Dr. Johnson's work, but rather of the editor/publisher of the e-book version that I purchased.

It's rather obvious that the e-book version was an afterthought, a simple OCR scan of the paper version without any proofreading or any other editing after the fact. Attached are a couple of screen-shots just a couple of pages into the book where Dr. Johnson is attempting to impress the concept of magnitude using scientific notation. Just one example in the first screen-shot is where the book says in plain English is that there are about 1022 carbon atoms in a 1 carat diamond. What Dr. Johnson obviously intended to say (and I'm sure is clear in the paper version), is that there are about 10 to the 22nd power (10 followed by 22 zeros) carbon atoms in a 1 carat diamond. That's a pretty significant error that misrepresents the exact point he is trying to make.

There are some pages that are so bad that they are completely unintelligible and unreadable. My preference would be that the publisher proofread and edit the e-book version so that it is a faithful representation of what Dr. Johnson wrote and then re-publish it so that I can read it on my Kindle app. Short of that, I would expect a paper version replacement or as a last resort, a full refund.
Narim
As an elder and an engineer, I'd always thought I had a pretty good balance between science and religion. I had't noticed over the years, how a strong diet of PBS and Science Channel specials had shifted many of my fundamental beliefs in God, and the nature of creation. I found myself questioning everything, and was becoming quite fatalistic in my 60's. This book changed all that. Over the course of two days my brain experienced a major reality check. As "common thought" and scietific assumptions failed the tests of statistical possibility, the inevitability of an intelligent source to all life began to emerge anew in my reasoning. Certain facts of science should not be explained by religion. But when scientists attempt to explain certain realities of faith through faulty application of methods and reasoning, and then clings to these tenets in spite of overwhelming evidence to the contrary, they just end up looking silly. This is what I came away with from my two day journey. The book was extremely detailed and yet very readable. I give it an A+. It may have been the most significant book I've read in 10 years.Probability's Nature and Nature's Probability: A Call to Scientific Integrity
Doulkree
I think all scientists should pick up a copy of this and really considered what it is saying. The conclusions would definitely have a ripple affect on the tenures and governmental grants....
Xangeo
This book draws attention to several problems with the reigning (materialist) view of how life began. Dr. Johnson focuses a lot on probability issues and the source of information.
The book is easy to read and offers a large number of thoughts worth ruminating about.

The book illustrates the advantages and pitfalls of self-publishing. On the one hand, the price is unbeatable and was brought to market quickly. On the other hand, there is room for improvement in how the material is organized. Although the quotes and thoughts make sense individually, the chapters and sections could be organized more coherently. Additional diagrams would also be much appreciated.

I urge everyone to get a copy and watch for the other book he is coming out with.
Dr. Royal Truman
Mannheim, Gemany
Nayatol
The book's main objective is to demonstrate that Intelligent Design
(ID) is empirically detectable. In nine short chapters, the
author swiftly covers broad domains such as probability calculations,
hypotheses on the origin of mass and energy in the universe, life
building blocks (e.g., DNA, enzymes, nucleotides, amino acids),
hypotheses on the origin of life (e.g., RNA world, panspermia),
information content in life, and why intelligent design matter.

The main turn off of the book is its usage of a large number of long
quotations of numerous scientific papers and popular books. Some
chapters are mostly made of quotations. At some point I would have
liked the author to stop quoting other people's work and present a
synthesis of his own ideas in his own words. Quotations amount to at
least 20% of the text, and I would not be surprised if the count is
actually above 30%. I was left with the impression that the author
strung together his reading notes to form the entire book. The author,
also, abruptly transitions from one subject to the next without any
explanations, which makes it very difficult to follow his reasoning.

The author introduces many technical aspects but in many cases without
first stating the objectives. I often looked ahead a few pages to
understand where the author was going. For instance, Einstein's
General Theory of Relativity is introduced in Chapter 3 for apparently
no reason. Its introduction still remain quite obscure to me. Another
example: the presentation of the Avida software (Chapter 7,
pp. 77-79). The author has one page introducing some details about it,
but we do not see until the end why it is important to read these
details. At the end, the author criticizes the in silico experiment of
evolving the EQU predicate from simpler logical operations, and I
agree with the author with the criticism, but I doubt that there are
enough details about this experiment to let the reader appreciate its
shortcomings. I have used the Avida software and read Lenski's paper
cited by the author. I believe I could understand the author's
criticism only because I read Lenski's paper.

We find the definition of "irreducibly complex", a central technical
term in ID, as late as Chapter 7, from a quoted text written by Michael
Behe. The following discussion by the author is disappointing as it
quotes again Michael Behe and other authors to describe the flagellum,
instead of describing it himself. But there is no discussion of the
criticisms that have been written by many authors against such a
definition. For example, the definition should take into account the
possibility that parts, or subset of parts, can be
useful (or was useful) for some organisms.

I would certainly have liked to see an expansion of the section titled
"The benefits of an ID model" (Chapter 9). Indeed what are its
benefits in terms of a scientific method or paradigm? But the section
is very short, a mere one page. And the examples (e.g., junk DNA)
presented by the author do not really support ID as a methodology.

On the positive side, the book is filled with technical details and
references from which the reader can further study the various fields
covered by the author.
SING
I am a public school teacher in Texas. I could not put down Dr. Johnson's book. I found the book to be very insightful and interesting, as well as illuminating in many factual areas. The perspective he creates is compelling! I highly recommend this book.Probability's Nature and Nature's Probability: A Call to Scientific Integrity