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eBook Three Seasons in the Wind: 950 Km by Canoe Down Northern Canadas Thelon River download
Science
Author: Michael Pitt,Kathleen Pitt
ISBN: 1552122298
Subcategory: Earth Sciences
Pages 156 pages
Publisher Trafford (August 1999)
Language English
Category: Science
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 477
ePUB size: 1388 kb
FB2 size: 1585 kb
DJVU size: 1820 kb
Other formats: doc azw mbr rtf

eBook Three Seasons in the Wind: 950 Km by Canoe Down Northern Canadas Thelon River download

by Michael Pitt,Kathleen Pitt


Start by marking Three Seasons in the Wind: 950 .

Start by marking Three Seasons in the Wind: 950 Km by Canoe Down Northern Canada's Thelon River as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. For their most recent wilderness adventure in 1997, Kathleen and Michael selected the Seal River in Northern Manitoba, where they spent 3 weeks paddling 300 km from Shethanei Lake to the western shore of Hudson Bay. In her non-paddling life, Kathleen is responsible for Document Strategies in Information Technology Services at the University of British Columbia. Michael is also employed at UBC, as Associate Professor of Grassland Ecology in the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences.

Find nearly any book by Kathleen Pitt. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Founded in 1997, BookFinder. Coauthors & Alternates.

950 km by Canoe Down Northern Canada's Thelon River. by Kathleen Pitt, Kathleen Pitt, Michael Pitt, Michael. Published May 5, 1999 by Trafford.

Step outside the pressures of modern life, and join Michael and Kathleen's quest for beauty, solitude and . Three Seasons in the Wind : 950 Kilometres by Canoe down Northern Canada's Thelon River.

Step outside the pressures of modern life, and join Michael and Kathleen's quest for beauty, solitude and adventure as they travel alone across the Barren Grounds.

After their Thelon River trip in 1993, Kathleen and Michael returned to the north in 1995 to spend 4 weeks travelling .

After their Thelon River trip in 1993, Kathleen and Michael returned to the north in 1995 to spend 4 weeks travelling 650 km down the Coppermine River from the site of historic Fort Enterprise to the Inuit community of Kugluktuk (formerly Coppermine) on the Arctic Coast. Even though it was published over ten years ago, Three Seasons in the Wind should appeal to any person who has ever penetrated the wilderness of North America on foot, horseback, canoe, or airplane; and to others as well who have yearned to pull the plug on all their electronic devices and to test their mettle away from the maddening crowds.

Michael and Kathleen Pitt had been paddling the rivers of Northern Canada for ten years. Kathleen and Michael Pitt are authors of "Three Seasons in the Wind: 950 km by Canoe Down Northern Canada's Thelon River, " published in 1999. Yet their experience seemed incomplete. Summer is for visitors. Michael needed to spend a winter in the North, where rivers, lakes and muskeg remain frozen for 7 to 8 months of the year. Only by following the winter trail did Michael believe that he could truly know the character and soul of Canada's vast, seemingly limitless Northern landscape.

Two summers later Michael and Kathleen descended the Seal River in Northern Manitoba .

Two summers later Michael and Kathleen descended the Seal River in Northern Manitoba, where they spent 3 weeks paddling 300 km from Shethanei Lake to the western shore of Hudson Ba. pitt/): Pitt, Kathleen and Michael Pitt. Three Seasons in the Wind: 950 Kilometres by Canoe down Northern Canada’s Thelon River. Hornby House Publications. Pitt, Michael D. Beyond the End of the Road: A Winter of Contentment North of the Arctic Circle. Agio Publishing House.

A real pleasure to follow Michael Pitt down four spectacular northern wilderness rivers

a valuable guidebook to these awesome rivers. It is personal, honest, wise, and even a bit cheeky - a joy to read. A real pleasure to follow Michael Pitt down four spectacular northern wilderness rivers. The book prompts the reader to be who you are no matter the source of the challenge!" - Tony Shaw, master instructor and perennial wilderness paddler.

Personal account of a 37-day, 950 km canoe trip down the Thelon River, across the Barren Grounds of Northern Canada.
Nidor
My only real complaint about this book is that I wish it were longer and had more photos. The style is a combination of the authors' personal diaries they kept while on their month-long voyage down the wild Thelon River in far northern Canada where the open tundra dominates. Their writing was very honest, and I felt intrigued to be reading a firsthand account instead of a recollection that you feel was written and embellished after their trip. At the end of the book, one of the authors describes a portage in great detail and provides a play-by-play of the physical rigors and also the emotional state during this long and arduous portage. This is a wonderful and memorable piece of writing, and I wish that they had given that level of detail to the entire trip. Nonetheless, highly recommended for those who love true adventure stories and who have any interest in a long wilderness canoe trip.
Llanonte
Even though it was published over ten years ago, Three Seasons in the Wind should appeal to any person who has ever penetrated the wilderness of North America on foot, horseback, canoe, or airplane; and to others as well who have yearned to pull the plug on all their electronic devices and to test their mettle away from the maddening crowds.
Written with a sense of wonder and respect for a world of grandeur and solitude, the authors also write with humor and occasional teasing about the practical tasks of day to day living on the river.
This book takes the reader on a five week canoe trip through the Barren Grounds of Canada's Northwest Territories . The authors, Kathleen and Michael Pitt, experienced canoe handlers and backpackers living in Vancouver B.C., describe their 950 km (570 mile) journey down the Thelon River beginning near the Great Slave Lake and ending at Baker Lake near Chesterfield Inlet on the west shore of Hudson Bay.
The bleak, treeless arctic tundra abounds with a variety of flora. Throughout the book, plant life and wild flower are identified and described by Michael, an expert in grassland ecology. The Barren Grounds also offered up a variety of animal life, musk ox, caribou, bears, wolves, great flocks of Canada geese and a lake trout caught for breakfast estimated at 78cm (30 in) in length by Michael and 8kg (17.6lbs) in weight by Kathleen.
For most of the journey mosquitoes and wind were their constant companion. They were prepared for the former, but not for the intensity and constancy of the latter which at times set them behind schedule. After a fortnight of travel on the Thelon River and with a feeling of disappointment at the loss of solitude, the couple came upon their first humans, four Europeans traveling in inflatable canoes. "I think the encounter disappointed both groups," Kathleen wrote in her diary.
Michael and Kathleen together with their canoe, camping equipment, and food topped the scales at 640 pounds, which was 40 pounds over the limit for the Cessna 185 float plane that would carry them from Ft. Smith to their departure point at Lynx Lake. Forty pounds of excess baggage was not divulged to the pilot. As the pontoon plane raced down the lake trying to lift off the water Michael wrote, "I thought about blurting out my lie about being exactly 600 pounds....Lift up, lift up, lift up, I pleaded silently...We finally lifted at the lake margin...I felt sick for the entire two and a half hour flight to Lynx Lake."
Having flown my own Piper Arrow from the lower forty eight through Canada to Alaska in 1995 with my wife and 75 pounds of survival equipment, I understand the importance of a weight limit. I suspect that Canadian bush pilots make a liberal allowance for clients who cheat on allowable weight.Flying the Rim
For the benefit of USA readers, the Canadian authors could have given a conversion from metric to English units of measure. For the first few chapters, the narrative seemed inconsistent with the cold temperatures in the low to mid 20s until I realized I was not reading Fahrenheit degrees but rather degrees Celsius.
THE MOUNTAIN OF SEVEN GABLESI have never paddled a canoe, though I have hiked and backpacked extensively in the mountains of California. Nevertheless, this Canadian couple, "alone together in their place of dreams," has pulled the essence of wilderness travel into a book that for me was a page turner.
Shaktit
This book succeeds through its unpretentious and honest description of a journey well taken. The concurrent use of diary entries from both of the Pitts gives the narrative a nice balanced feel. The details of how to prepare and do what is required by a trip such as this are very clearly explained without bogging down the story. The canoe seems to represent chiefly a means, rather than an end, because the authors are best at defining why they did this in the first place. Their story provides inspiration particularly to those of us who have not been there before.