» » Blue Frontier: Saving America's Living Seas
eBook Blue Frontier: Saving America's Living Seas download
Science
Author: David Helvarg
ISBN: 0805071350
Subcategory: Biological Sciences
Pages 320 pages
Publisher Holt Paperbacks; Reprint edition (May 1, 2002)
Language English
Category: Science
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 453
ePUB size: 1112 kb
FB2 size: 1706 kb
DJVU size: 1879 kb
Other formats: rtf mobi lrf doc

eBook Blue Frontier: Saving America's Living Seas download

by David Helvarg


Despite all the problems and challenges we face fighting for America's living seas, that is still enough to give one hope.

Aboard a helicopter, he writes, "We circle around the flat-topped platform called Pompano. Despite all the problems and challenges we face fighting for America's living seas, that is still enough to give one hope. After all, it is not every great nation, forged by its earliest frontier experiences, that gets a second chance.

Personal Name: Helvarg, David, 1951-. Publication, Distribution, et. New York All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Blue frontier : saving America's living seas, David Helvard online for free. New York. All rights are reserved by their owners.

David Helvarg is a long-time ocean enthusiast whose reporting on the oceans goes back to the 1970s when he wrote an award-winning series of articles on the rush to develop deep sea mining.

Library of Congress Control Number: 00010956. Download book Blue frontier : saving America's living seas, David Helvarg online for free. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 0716737159. System Control Number:. System Control Number: (OCoLC)44818591.

Start by marking Blue Frontier: Saving America's Living Seas as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

David Helvarg talks about his book,, it covers topics from .

David Helvarg talks about his book,, it covers topics from off-shore drilling to the opening up of Alask. The book says the new Bush administration has appointed a commission to examine the state of America’s seas and outlines the major issues that the new commission probably will explore. The book covers topics from off-shore drilling to the opening up of Alaska for new energy alternatives. After the presentation the author answered questions from members of the audience. David Helvarg talked about his book, Blue Frontier: Saving America’s Living Seas, published by . Freeman & Company.

Rescue Warriors, The . S. Coast Guard, America's Forgotten Heroes. Blue Frontier : Saving Americas Living Seas by David Helvarg. newSpecify the genre of the book on their own. Author: David Helvarg. Title: Blue Frontier : Saving Americas Living Seas. No user reports were added yet. Be the first! Send report: This is a good book.

David Helvarg (born April 10, 1951) is an American journalist and environmental activist

David Helvarg (born April 10, 1951) is an American journalist and environmental activist. and founded a lobbying organization: the Blue Frontier Campaign. He also became a member of the board of Reef Relief, a more specific marine conservation advocacy group, about which he had made a television documentary in 1994.

By David Helvarg Freeman. Of course, I had no way of knowing that on a dark summer night in June 1977, as I watched the Deep Sea Miner Two, a 560-foot, 20,000-ton, converted Liberian ore carrier slip out of San Diego harbor. The dock area around the Tenth Avenue Terminal had been sealed off to curious onlookers hours before the ship's unpublicized departure.

A fascinating account of America's oceans and ocean politics, Blue Frontier explores the impact of history, commerce, and policy on marine life -- and by extension all life on earth. From the legacy of navy-funded research and development since World War II to the current newsworthy topics such as beach closures, collapsing fish stocks, killer algae, hurricanes, and oil spills, Blue Frontier takes readers on an adventure-filled tour of America's last great wilderness range. Despite today's wide-open development along our coasts and in offshore waters, Blue Frontier argues that sensible policies can still halt the onslaught of industrial destruction. An impassioned call for a new approach to ocean stewardship, Blue Frontier is essential reading for anyone interested in saving our maritime culture and heritage.
Glei
It's not just a book -- it's an adventure!
This book is full of interesting information yet amazingly fun to read as it takes us on an exciting journey around America's oceans. I learned much about various threats to the marine environment and the struggles dedicated people are launching against those threats.
Opilar
Helvarg offers front-line account of fight to save the Blue Frontier
By David Liscio
If it's possible to wax poetically about the way offshore oil rigs attract fish, while still remaining a staunch environmentalist, then author David Helvarg has succeeded.
Aboard a helicopter, he writes, "We circle around the flat-topped platform called Pompano. Owned by BP-Amoco, it is the second tallest bottom-fixed structure in the world, drilling into the ocean floor 1,310 feet below the surface. About 700 feet wide at its base, it is taller than the Empire State Building."
Another platform, Amberjack, is described as "the ultimate Tinkertoy. An active drilling rig, it towers 272 feet from the waterline to the top of its bottle-shaped derrick. Its density of utilized space is a structural salute to human ingenuity."
Author of "The War Against the Greens," Helvarg's latest book, "Blue Frontier: Saving America's Living Seas," (New York: W.H. Freeman & Co., 2001), delivers in-depth reporting on subjects such as ocean mining, reef management, oil exploration, over-fishing, and government ineptitude when it comes to formulating sound environmental policy. The author clearly has divided his time between research libraries and the field. He has visited the underwater living quarters of scientists off the coast of Key West, climbed the towering oil platforms in the Gulf of Mexico, and gone diving off Monterey where Californians keep sharp lookout for white sharks, all with the intention to see up-close what's going on.
At the start of the chapter on offshore petroleum drilling, Helvarg quotes an oil company spokesman recalling the Huntington Beach oil spill of 1990. The spokesman says, "Then this Hollywood star pulls up in his limo, must have been half a block long, wanting to know what we've done to his beach. And I'm thinking, hey that limo of yours doesn't run on sunbeams you know."
Helvarg has been beneath the surface of the sea to examine precisely the rampant devastation of fragile ecosystems, the destruction of coral reefs by disease, human waste, phosphate blanketing, and sheer overuse, particularly dive boats that anchor rather than use fixed moorings.
Although the Alaskan coast dominates the news in 2001 whenever discussion turns to offshore drilling, Helvarg noted, "There are some 4,000 platforms operating in the Gulf of Mexico today. Offshore drilling accounts for 20 percent of U.S. oil production and 27 percent of its natural gas. Despite heated debate over drilling off California, Florida, Alaska, and North Carolina, 93 percent of all present offshore production takes place in the gulf." He found that many of those expensive rigs are run by disciplined crews who produce lucrative returns for investors.
Helvarg has meticulously and colorfully described how the oil industry was created in North America, and included a brief review of the movie industry and the media impact it produced. For example, he cited the 1953 film "Thunder Bay" starring Jimmy Stewart as an oil geologist confronting suspicious shrimp fishermen in Louisiana's bayou. As Helvarg put it, the film reflects the dominant view of the time when progress and industry were thought to be synonymous, while today, an oil gusher would be viewed as an ecological disaster.
Key Largo, off Southern Florida, epitomizes another dilemma. In Helvarg's words, "Branching corals that once grew here remain only as skeletal sticks in bleached rubble fields. Many of the abundant rock corals are being eaten away by diseases that have spread in an epidemic wave throughout the Florida Keys. The names of the diseases tell the story: black band, white band, white plague, and aspergillus, a fungus normally found in terrestrial soil that can shred fan corals like moths shred Irish lace."
Through interviews and an exhaustive search for truth, Helvarg has broken new ground. He has managed to explain in a clear and straightforward writing style such issues as beach closings, oil spills, collapsing fish stocks, killer algae, pollution, reckless development, and the failure of the U.S. government to protect what may be its final frontier - the Blue Frontier.
Most importantly, he has found reason to remain optimistic. Consider his closing remarks: "Our oceans remain full of strange wonders and grand experiences that will thrill generations yet unborn. Despite all the problems and challenges we face fighting for America's living seas, that is still enough to give one hope. After all, it is not every great nation, forged by its earliest frontier experiences, that gets a second chance."
(David Liscio is the environmental reporter for The Daily Item newspaper in Lynn, MA, an ecology professor at Endicott College in Beverly, MA, and the Massachusetts correspondent to the Society of Environmental Journalists.
Gralsa
I read this book (a tattered, signed copy to an unknown "Jean Carper") while working as a groundfish observer on board a factory trawler in the Bering Sea. This book puts into perspective things that I have learned thus far in a manner I wish I had the ability to convey to the public. It taught me a ton about other industries as well. This book is a wonderful balance of teaching and entertaining that is written like a personal journal in fast pace as David Helvarg travels around, interviewing professionals and witnessing first-hand the state of our oceans. The writing style leans more to conversations and imagery than legislation and citation, which is what I expected in a book about a subject as broad as the state of the ocean. Even the really complex stuff, like in the chapter Drowning in Red Tape is written in a way that I always find trouble explaining, yet David rattles off a way that makes it sound simple.

It is a little out-dated today, and it's my understanding that he has a new book out. Keep this in mind while you're reading it, but definitely still pick this book up if you get the chance.
Dorilune
David Helvarg takes the reader on a whirlwind tour of America's last great frontier - Our ocean wilderness. In lively, informative and often amusing writing he introduces us to the people and the critters who populate wet America, our 200 mile wide Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) which,he also points out, is larger than the continental United States and far more challenging than the Wild West ever was.
From aircraft carriers, to underwater science labs, offshore oil rigs to Antarctic waters, he shows us both the tremendous environmental dangers facing our living seas as well as the watermen and women who are working to right things. If you're going to read one book about the seas, or encourage students and young people to learn more about our maritime heritage and future, this is the book to pick up and pass along.