» » The Surprising Archaea: Discovering Another Domain of Life
eBook The Surprising Archaea: Discovering Another Domain of Life download
Science
Author: John L. Howland
ISBN: 0195111834
Subcategory: Biological Sciences
Pages 224 pages
Publisher Oxford University Press (March 9, 2000)
Language English
Category: Science
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 362
ePUB size: 1886 kb
FB2 size: 1111 kb
DJVU size: 1470 kb
Other formats: lit docx mbr rtf

eBook The Surprising Archaea: Discovering Another Domain of Life download

by John L. Howland


He explains its fundamental evolutionary premises particularly well.

He explains its fundamental evolutionary premises particularly well. The Iurprising Archaea examines discovery and the evolutionary and ecological importance of these organisms. in addition to exploring the archaeal rise from obscurity to their current prominent place in molecular and evolutionary biology, the book promotes a wider awareness of the world of microbes.

The Surprising Archaea: Discovering Another Domain of Life is a popular science book written about the domain Archaea. It was written by John L. Howland and first published in 2000 by the Oxford University Press. The book records the, "archaeal. to their current prominent place in molecular and evolutionary biology.

The Surprising Archaea book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Surprising Archaea: Discovering Another Domain of Life as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Although the Archaea comprise one of the three fundamental domains of life, they were .

Although the Archaea comprise one of the three fundamental domains of life, they were only recognized as a group about twenty years ago. They include microorganisms that live in oceanic hydrothermal vents, within the guts of animals, or in concentrated brines. And they are of extremely ancient lineage, having diverged from bacteria very early in the history of life. In addition to exploring the archaeal rise from obscurity to their current prominent place in molecular and evolutionary biology, this book promotes a wider awareness of the world of microbes. Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Items related to The Surprising Archaea: Discovering Another Domain. John L. Howland The Surprising Archaea: Discovering Another Domain of Life. ISBN 13: 9780195111835. The Surprising Archaea: Discovering Another Domain of Life. This book tells their emerging story, from their toughness in the face of forbidding environments to their unique place in evolution and in the world ecosystem. He explains its fundamental evolutionary premises particularly well.

Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of John L. Howland's books. Howland’s Followers. None yet. Howland. Howland’s books. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, .

The Surprising "Archaea": "Discovering Another Domain of Life" is a popular science book written about the domain Archaea.

The Surprising Archaea : Discovering Another Domain of Life. Although they comprise one of the three fundamental branches of life, the Archaea were only recognized as a group about twenty years ago. This recognition was based on similarities between their RNA sequences, similarities all the more striking because of the diversity of archaeal lifestyles. They include microorganisms that live in boiling water, within the guts of animals, or in concentration brines.

The Surprising Archaea: Discovering Another Domain of Life. Foreword 1. Meeting some Archaea 2. Their Discovery 3. Finding them in nature (and bringing them home) 4. Archaeal portraits 5. Where they live (and how they manage) 6. From a historical perspectiv. More).

Although they comprise one of the three fundamental branches of life, the Archaea were only recognized as a group about twenty years ago. This recognition was based on similarities between their RNA sequences, similarities all the more striking because of the diversity of archaeal lifestyles. They include microorganisms that live in boiling water, within the guts of animals, or in concentration brines. It is also evident that the Archaea diverged early in the history of life, and are of great evolutionary interest as a result. This book tells their emerging story, from their toughness in the face of forbidding environments to their unique place in evolution and in the world ecosystem.
Gindian
Just what he was looking for.
Felolv
In his unusually thorough, non specialist, treatment of anaerobic
extremeophiles (non-oxygen using bacteria that live in weird places), the author answers some interesting questions, such as what kind of biologic adaptions does it take to live in places like boiling water or acid lakes? How do you collect samples of them? How do you culture creatures that die in the presense of oxygen? Is it possible that there's an entire biosphere far below ground?
Oddly, the one explanation he leaves out why the archea are generally only found today in hostile places.
Painbrand
I Loved it. A lot of information about the Archaea world.
Gavirus
This book contains everything anyone not actually working in the field need to know about the new domain. It describes what the arcaea are like, how they were discovered, a little about the technology used to study them and it goes further: It discusses the implications for the study of the origin of life. A very readable book. However, it is already a few years old, which quickly becomes a problem in such a new and rapidly developing field. Maybe soon time for a revised edition?
Gann
In this slim volume Howland (Bowdoin College, Maine) introduces readers to a domain of organisms, and their biological life-style, that have only become moderately understood within the last 30 years. As such, it is a modest success, and the information it contains is useful. However, there are some shortcomings, including redundancies and organizational difficulties that detract from the overall value of the book, making it difficult to recommend, except for the fact that there are no other books in this category. Students, undergraduate as well as graduate, need to learn about these organisms. Undergraduate students particularly would be well advised to read the section on obtaining energy, since the concepts covered there will be useful in many other contexts. Given that need, which this book adequately addresses, it seems that this volume should be added to the research library. Hopefully, future editions or future authors will cover this interesting material in a more coherent and organized manner. (This is excerpted from my review in Choice, the review journal of the American Library Association.)
GYBYXOH
"Animal, vegetable or mineral?" It seems that question leaves out almost all living things. Biologically, the plants, animals---even yeast---are closer to one another than to any bacterium. The difference is that the former---the Eukarya---have cells with nuclei, while the Bacteria do not. Genetically, there is a third domain of life---the Archaea. A member of the Archaea is as different, genetically, from a member of either of the other domains as a bacterium is from you. The tree of life has THREE genetic branches. The remarkable discovery of the third domain of life had to await the development of modern methods of genetic analysis; the definitive paper (by Carl Woese and colleagues from the University of Illinois) appeared in 1977. Howland has written a lucid and highly entertaining overview of the biology of the Archaea, coveing everything from their ecology to the structure of archaeal cells. The level of sophistication expected of the reader is about the same as would be needed to enjoy a Scientific American article.
The Sinners from Mitar
Small but a nice book. Not many illustrations.
The author seems more a teacher than a researcher.
Archea are like bacteria but they are different.
Many archea are extremophiles living
in hot springs or other stressful environments.
From the name "archea" I assumed these critters were older than
the ones we are familiar with, but the tree of life in this book
shows the eucharia branch (us) at the same time or earlier than the archea.
Puzzling. Perhaps it isn't known so everything branches at the same time.
The book seems about 70% comprehensible to
non biological majors like earth scientists.
A great survey of the current state of knowledge about this

intriguing group of organisms. The writing is clear and

informative. Howland describes a few

classic examples of the group in detail and gives a good

picture of the entire kingdom and its place in evolutionary

history.

Throughout the book he does a wonderful job of explaining how

researchers arrived at their conclusions and how much

faith the reader should have in the theories he

puts forward.