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Science
Author: Maurice Maeterlinck
ISBN: 1443723673
Subcategory: Biological Sciences
Pages 436 pages
Publisher Hesperides Press (November 4, 2008)
Language English
Category: Science
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 613
ePUB size: 1287 kb
FB2 size: 1941 kb
DJVU size: 1397 kb
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eBook The Life of the Bee download

by Maurice Maeterlinck


The Life of the Bee. Read. One fee. Stacks of books.

It is taken from a book, in my opinion the most beautiful thing ever written about the life of bees, written by the great poet and playwright Maurice Maeterlinck

It is taken from a book, in my opinion the most beautiful thing ever written about the life of bees, written by the great poet and playwright Maurice Maeterlinck. In that work, Maeterlinck uses the expression 'The Spirit of the Beehive' to name the powerful, enigmatic and paradoxical force that the bees seem to obey, and that the reason of man has never come to understand. It must surely be the most beautiful evocation of the bees' lives ever written.

This book forms part of my remarkably extensive reading list on Nobel Prize for Literature Laureates. Essentially "Life of a Bee" is a study of the social aspects of the hive. Borrowing liberally from other sources Maeterlinck weaves a masterful narrative around the cycles of life that exist in the natural world. Like most of his work, there is an underlying deep feeling of philosophical symbolism and harmony.

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It comes to pass with the bees as with most of the things in this world; we remark some few of their habits; we say .

It comes to pass with the bees as with most of the things in this world; we remark some few of their habits; we say they do this, they work in such and such fashion, their queens are born thus, their workers are virgin, they swarm at a certain time. And then we imagine we know them, and ask nothing more. We watch them hasten from flower to flower, we see the constant agitation within the hive; their life seems very simple to us, and bounded, like every life, by the instinctive cares of reproduction and nourishment.

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Электронная книга "The Life of the Bee", Maurice Maeterlinck. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Life of the Bee" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Maurice Polydore Marie Bernard Maeterlinck (29 August 1862 – 6 May 1949), also known as Count (or Comte) Maeterlinck from 1932, was a Belgian playwright, poet, and essayist who was Flemish but wrote in French.

One of the most curious of books that have appeared in many months is "The Life of the Bee," by Maurice . reason and instinct, Maeterlinck has a theme from which he has developed a sort of prose poem full of dreamy yet subtle philosophy of life and life's mysteries

One of the most curious of books that have appeared in many months is "The Life of the Bee," by Maurice Maeterlinck  . reason and instinct, Maeterlinck has a theme from which he has developed a sort of prose poem full of dreamy yet subtle philosophy of life and life's mysteries. Translated by Alfred Sutro, 1914. ake towards the truth. I shall state nothing, therefore, that I have not verified myself, or that is not so fully accepted in the text-books as to render further verification superfluous.

Maeterlinck, Maurice, 1862-1949 You can read The Life of the Bee by Maeterlinck, Maurice.

Maeterlinck, Maurice, 1862-1949 You can read The Life of the Bee by Maeterlinck, Maurice, 1862-1949 in our library for absolutely free. Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader.

THE LIFE OF THE BEE By Iht Same Contents include: I. ON THE THRESHOLD OF THE HIVE II. THE SWARM III. THE FOUNDATION OF THE CITY IV. THE LIFE OF THE BEE V. THE YOUNG QUEENS VI. THE NUPTIAL FLIGHT VII. THE MASSACRE OF THE MALES VIII. THE PROGRESS OF THE RACE. IT is not my intention to write a treatise on apiculture, or on practical beekeeping. Excellent works of the kind abound in all civilised countries, and it were useless to attempt another. France has those of Dadant, Georges de Lay ens and Bonnier, Bertrand, Hamet, Weber, Clement, the Abbe Collin, etc. Englishspeaking countries have Langs troth, Bevan, Cook, Cheshire, Cowan, Root, etc. Germany has Dzierzon, Van Berlespoch, Pollmann, Vogel, and many others. Nor is this book to be a scientific monograph on Apis Mellifica, Ligustica, Fasciata, Dorsata, etc., or a collection of new observations and studies. I shall say scarcely anything that those will not know who are somewhat familiar with bees. The notes and experiments I have made during my twenty years of bee keeping I shall reserve for a more techni cal work for their interest is necessarily of a special and limited nature, and I am anxious not to overburden this essay. I wish to speak of the bees very simply, as one speaks of a subject one knows and loves to those who know it not. I do not intend to adorn the truth, or merit the just reproach Reaumur addressed to his predecessors in the study of our honeyflies, whom he accused of substituting for the marvellous reality marvels that were imaginary and merely plausible. The fact that the hive contains so much that is wonderful does not warrant our seeking to add to its wonders. Besides, I myself have now for a long time ceased to look for anything more beautiful in this world, or more interesting, than the truth or at least than the effort one is able to make towards the truth. I shall state nothing, therefore, that I have not verified myself, or that is not so fully accepted in the textbooks as to render further verifica tion superfluous. My facts shall be as accurate as though they appeared in a practical manual or scientific monograph, but I shall relate them in a somewhat livelier fashion than such works would allow, shall group them more harmoni ously together, and blend them with freer and more mature reflections. The reader of this book will not learn there from how to manage a hive but he will know more or less all that can with any certainty be known of the curious, pro found, and intimate side of its inhabi tants. Nor will this be at the cost of what still remains to be learned. I shall pass over in silence the hoary traditions that, in the country and many a book, still constitute the legend of the hive. Whenever there be doubt, disagreement, hypothesis, when I arrive at the unknown, I shall declare it loyally you will find that we often shall halt before the un known. Beyond the appreciable facts of their life we know but little of the bees. And the closer our acquaintance becomes, the nearer is our ignorance brought to us of the depths of their real existence but such ignorance is better than the other kind, which is uncon scious, and satisfied. Does an analogous work on the bee exist?
Gold Crown
It is a classic, of course. He makes it quite clear that he is not an entymologist or an apiarist, but his own observations over many years are priceless. Particularly interesting are his explanations of swarming when the queen bee flies to higher altitudes than most bees can reach and is pursued by the male bees, one fortunate male is able to impregnate the queen while in flight--only to have his abdomen ripped out and dying when the deed is done. The sperm from that one donor is stored in a special organ in the queen's abdomen, where it is doled out to fertilize each of the thousands of eggs she will lay daily. It's a gruesome death for the successful donor, but that one male bee gets to father generations and literally hundreds of thousands of new bees. The fun part of Maeterlinck's descriptions is the endlessly delicate terminology he uses to describe the copulation process to a rigidly Puritanical Victorian readership in 19th century Europe. He has to resort to much word verbiage to explain the fact that--humans not excluded--in so far as Nature is concerned, the only reason for copulation is to continue the species.
Malojurus
Profound but hard to follow his intense, intellectual, and phiosophicall point of view at times. His use of the English language is impressive but he lost me a couple of times and it took a rereading of several passages to see his connection between the life of bees and the life of humanity. That being said, I still enjoyed the challenge and feel his prognosis that much more observing is needed vs.drawing conclusions too quickly. I couldn't help but think that quantum biology and all the other emerging quanta reinforce the author's views on "what is coming".
Hatе&love
Victor Erice's great film, "The Spirit of the Beehive" (1973), had as the inspiration for its title this work by Maeterlink. Since the film has been a favorite since I saw it in a theatre when it opened on its limited American debut, only to fall into obscurity until 2006 when Criterion reissued it in a fine remastered box set, I felt I had to have this book. Erice writes, "The title [of my film] really is not mine. It is taken from a book, in my opinion the most beautiful thing ever written about the life of bees, written by the great poet and playwright Maurice Maeterlinck. In that work, Maeterlinck uses the expression 'The Spirit of the Beehive' to name the powerful, enigmatic and paradoxical force that the bees seem to obey, and that the reason of man has never come to understand."

It must surely be the most beautiful evocation of the bees' lives ever written. I read it with the same pleasure as I do great poetry, even though my interest in bees is limited at best to my alarm that they're being decimated by our chemicals. Anyone can read this book and derive as much aesthetic pleasure from it as one gleans from its fascinating insights into these astonishing creatures. Your next dollop of honey will never be quite the same.
doesnt Do You
I can't be ungrateful for a FREE book, but if you are as ignorant as I am, you will not realize that Maeterlinck (1862-1949) waxed (no pun intended) poetic on all sorts of subjects and the language is lovely but the information is very romantic and not exactly correct. This is somewhat like reading Rudolf Steiner on bees, which is very interesting but of no use whatsoever to a beginning beekeeper.
Rainbearer
An interesting book well written in the style of 1901 when it was published. The writer was very, very verbose and philosophical. I do wonder how people held conversations at that time. If people went on and on in the same way, though I have heard that political speeches lasted for hours as did sermons. Mr. Maeterlinck did love the bees and was obviously entranced by them. He offered very interesting information about what went on/goes on inside a bee hive if you can wade through and get to it. It is worth the read in spite of what I have said above.
Painbrand
I loved this very insightful book that mixes beekeeping with philosophy and natural history. The only point I didn't like so much was the few poetic phrases that the author inserts every now and then. Other than that, very highly recommended.
lacki
interested in learning more about bees, hope one day to be a beekeeper
All the animals that nourish us (cows, lamb, goats, pigs, elephants,etc) we take care of them too. However the bees take care of us with their familiar honey which does not rot, its medicinal value and adding $15 billion to our economy thru agriculture and feeding us and the rest of the world by pollination! Interesting and illuminating story about the bees