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eBook Illustrated Theory of Everything: The Origin and Fate of the Universe download
Science
Author: Stephen Hawking
ISBN: 1597776114
Subcategory: Astronomy & Space Science
Pages 117 pages
Publisher Phoenix Books (September 15, 2009)
Language English
Category: Science
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 944
ePUB size: 1163 kb
FB2 size: 1994 kb
DJVU size: 1111 kb
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eBook Illustrated Theory of Everything: The Origin and Fate of the Universe download

by Stephen Hawking


It would havebeen the beginning of the universe. In the third lecture I shall talk about black holes. These are formed when amassive star or an even larger body collapses in on itself under its owngravitational pull.

It would havebeen the beginning of the universe. According to Einstein’s general theory of relativity, anyonefoolish enough to fall into a black hole will be lost forever.

The Theory of Everything book. I am so into Astronomy and kind of Stephen Hawking books, but sorry, the writing of this book didn't make me inspired to learn from here. Jun 30, 2019 Pallavi Kamat rated it liked it.

Stephen W. Hawking is widely considered to be the world’s greatest mind, a brilliant theoretical physicist whose work helped reconfigure models of the . Another example is his final chapter on the quest for a theory of everything. Hawking is widely considered to be the world’s greatest mind, a brilliant theoretical physicist whose work helped reconfigure models of the universe and define what’s in it. Hawking is the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge.

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. It's remarkable the optimism for a unified theory in 1996 Regardless, a very useful discussion about what we have learned about the Universe and some of the implications that may be issues for future inquiry. The idea of combining quantum and relativity theories is creative and seemingly useful, but doesn't get it done so far. And, certainly didn't before the 21st century. Physics IS evidently is the new phlosophy.

The happiest people don't have the best of everything, they just make the best of everything. Systems Thinking, : Managing Chaos and Complexity: A Platform for Designing Business Architecture. 09 MB·115,041 Downloads·New! theory and to deal operationally with systems methodology Materials for High Temperature Power Gene.

For a long time it was thought that this was thewhole universe. It was only in 1924 that the American astronomer EdwinHubble demonstrated that ours was not the only galaxy. It was only in 1924 that the American astronomer EdwinHubble demonstrated that ours was not the only galaxy thers, with vast tracks of empty space between them.

Illustrated Theory of Everything: The Origin and Fate of the Universe. Author: Stephen Hawking.

Stephen Hawking is widely believed to be one of the world’s greatest minds, a brilliant theoretical physicist . Using that as a launching pad, he explores the reaches of modern physics, including theories on the origin of the universe (.

Stephen Hawking is widely believed to be one of the world’s greatest minds, a brilliant theoretical physicist whose work helped reconfigure models of the universe and define what’s in it. Imagine sitting in a room listening to Hawking discuss these achievements and place them in historical context; it would be like hearing Christopher Columbus on the New World. the Big Bang), the nature of black holes, and space-time.

Into the Universe with Stephen Hawking is a 2010 science documentary television mini-series written by British physicist Stephen Hawking. The series was created for Discovery Channel by Darlow Smithson Productions and features computer generated imagery of the universe created by Red Vision.

Stephen Hawking is widely believed to be one of the world’s greatest minds, a brilliant theoretical physicist whose work helped reconfigure models of the universe and define what’s in it. Imagine sitting in a room listening to Hawking discuss these achievements and place them in historical context; it would be like hearing Christopher Columbus on the New World. Hawking presents a series of seven lectures—covering everything from big bang to black holes to string theory—that capture not only the brilliance of Hawking’s mind but his characteristic wit as well. Of his research on black holes, which absorbed him for more than a decade, he says, “It might seem a bit like looking for a black cat in a coal cellar.” Hawking begins with a history of ideas about the universe, from Aristotle’s determination that the Earth is round to Hubble’s discovery, more than 2,000 years later, that the universe is expanding. Using that as a launching pad, he explores the reaches of modern physics, including theories on the origin of the universe (e.g., the Big Bang), the nature of black holes, and space-time. Finally, he poses the questions left unanswered by modern physics, especially how to combine all the partial theories into a “unified theory of everything.” “If we find the answer to that,” he claims, “it would be the ultimate triumph of human reason.” A great popularizer of science as well as a brilliant scientist, Hawking believes that advances in theoretical science should be “understandable in broad principle by everyone, not just a few scientists.” In this book, he offers a fascinating voyage of discovery about the cosmos and our place in it. It is a book for anyone who has ever gazed at the night sky and wondered what was up there and how it came to be.  

Burgas
Bought it for my husband. He loves these kinds of books.
Rich Vulture
good book
Angana
I purchased this as a gift for my sister but I simply had to sneak a peak before giving it to her. The writing is interesting and clear and the pictures are really beautiful. I could definitely spend some time with this book allowing it to boggle my mind.
Modar
Considering the price, Cover was a little messed up but the book is in pretty good condition. i'm actually quite impressed.
ME
It is always interesting to read current ideas on the universe and what they think is going on. I always enjoy reading Stephen Hawking because his books are not too technical and can be read by the common person.
Anararius
This is definitely a book that is a mixed bag. It is one whose identity of the intended audience I am unsure of. I really can't say who this book has been written for, yet I think it can be an enjoyable book. I am not at all convinced that someone who has read A Brief History of Time will have the appropriate familiarity with the concepts in this book to see it as worthwhile --and believe me when I say that this book is a compilations of lectures that lacks all introductory information necessary to understand it. What's more, I can see the graduate student of physics could be bored by this book. Therefore, in considering who has the knowledge to handle this book, and who (with the knowledge) would not be bored by it, I have concluded that this book must be geared towards the undergraduate student of the sciences. I hope this little excursion into trying to figure out at whom this book is directed conveys some of my frustration with it.

These grumblings aside, the book is not bad. Basically, the book presents topics in physics that are at the frontier, and which are topics of a great deal of discussion. Additionally, the format of these lectures is more like that of public lectures than a university style lectures, as no technical mathematics is presented.

Overall, I would say this: who you are will greatly determine whether you will enjoy this book. It was a bit banal for me, given my background in physics. If you don't have an undergraduate knowledge of science, but have read an inordinate amount of popular physics, or are willing to actively research terms and concepts while reading, then you will do fine, I think; but you will not be able to read this book straight through, front to back.

To conclude, this is a four star book for an audience like undergraduates of sciences, but more like a two star book for most everyone else. Hawking also says (on his website: [..] ) that he wishes the this particular book weren't still in print, because it no longer reflects his views, so that is one more point to consider, if you are think about buying this on. For me, that consideration is what made the book slightly more interesting of a read.
Tegore
True, the book does not represent Hawking's latest views, but for those wishing to wade into the shallow end of Hawking's writing this is not bad.

Coming in at a short 112 pages, this heavily illustrated book gives one a opportunity to at least familiarize themselves with issues that Hawking gives much more detailed treatment to in his other works: A brief history of time, Black holes and Baby Universes and On the Shoulders of Giants.

One good for instance is his chapter on the arrow of time. In it Hawking observes that there is not only one but several arrows of time. Though he only talks about cosmic expansion, gravitation and the perceptual arrows of time (and not Kaon decay or the quantum arrow of time which may be the master arrow), one still gets the idea that there are physical reasons for why time assumes a directionality.

Another example is his final chapter on the quest for a theory of everything. Though now -- particularly with waning enthusiasm for string theory -- there is reasoned speculation that maybe there may never be a theory of everything, his chapter stills reflects how many view still view the search.

And finally, his chapter on black hole radiation harkens back to the research that originally put him on the map, his 1974 finding that black holes do indeed radiate and even given enough time will decay.

All together, Hawking's book shows the lucid explanatory power of one who both knows and knows how to explain.

So yes, by all means, read this book, but don't stop here and read the rest of his books too.
I've just read a copy of the hardcover version of "The Illustrated Theory of Everything" by Hawking, and I have to say that it is a very good (and easy) read for anybody who wants to know the basics of astrophysics (e.i. the origins of the universe, black holes, etc.). The book is really just a series of seven lectures by Hawking, first published in the mid-1990s under the title "The Cambridge Lectures." So, it should be noted that some of the content is out of date.

While many of the illustrations in the book are amazing, especially the Hubble pictures, they are mostly useless. Also, I noticed a few odd editorial problems in the book. For example, at one point it is stated that there are about "1,080" particles in the universe, but clearly this is meant to be 10^80 (10 to the 80th power) particles in the universe.

Still, this is a very interesting read. And since the book is so short (110 pages + a short forward and an intro), it wont take too much of your time - so, if this subject does end up grabbing your interest, you can go out and buy a book that's more in-depth and updated.