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Science
Author: David Ewing Duncan
ISBN: 0380793245
Subcategory: Astronomy & Space Science
Pages 328 pages
Publisher Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (June 1, 1999)
Language English
Category: Science
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 759
ePUB size: 1452 kb
FB2 size: 1352 kb
DJVU size: 1199 kb
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eBook Calendar: Humanity's Epic Struggle to Determine a True and Accurate Year download

by David Ewing Duncan


Calendar: Humanity's Epic Struggle to Determine a True and Accurate Year (1999-Avon).

His next book is Talking to Robots: Tales from Our Human-Robot Futures (Dutton-Penguin). He also wrote the bestsellers Experimental Man and Calendar. Calendar: Humanity's Epic Struggle to Determine a True and Accurate Year (1999-Avon). Residents: The Perils and Promise of Training Young Doctors (1996-Scribner).

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Mr. Duncan brilliantly evokes the more philosophical tensions within Christianity about the nature of time. We encounter heroes and villains, popes and emperors.

A popular history of humanity's attempts to document the passage of time using a calendar system. David Ewing Duncan is the author of five books, including the international bestseller Calendar, and writes for Wired, Discover, and The Atlantic Monthly

A popular history of humanity's attempts to document the passage of time using a calendar system. Not much in the way of scholarly citation, and Duncan really tries to pack it all in here, but I was intrigued and engaged throughout, and thought the book ended up being quite good. David Ewing Duncan is the author of five books, including the international bestseller Calendar, and writes for Wired, Discover, and The Atlantic Monthly. He also writes the popular "Biotech and Creativity" column for the San Francisco Chronicle.

Discover more about David Ewing Duncan David Ewing Duncan is an award-winning, best-selling author of nine books . Calendar: Humanity's Epic Struggle to Determine a True and Accurate Year. Past Shows: Human-Robot Futures, Biblical Prophecy.

Discover more about David Ewing Duncan. Read their interviews on Coast to Coast AM and learn about their background. David is CEO and Curator of Arc Fusion, and a Health Strategist in Residence for IDEO. He is a columnist for the Daily Beast and the chief correspondent for NPR Talk’s Biotech Nation. David writes for The New York Times, Atlantic, Fortune, Wired, National Geographic, Discover, and Outside, among others.

Read full description. See details and exclusions. Calendar:: Humanity's Epic Struggle to Determine a True and Accurate Year by David Ewing Duncan (Paperback, 1999). Brand new: lowest price.

His books include the international bestseller Calendar: Humanity's Epic Struggle to Determine a True and Accurate Year (978–0–380–79324–2)

His books include the international bestseller Calendar: Humanity's Epic Struggle to Determine a True and Accurate Year (978–0–380–79324–2). He is a former special producer and correspondent for ABC's Nightline, and appears regularly on CNN and programs such as Today and Good Morning America. Lifestyle & Sports. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

David Ewing Duncan talking at the Chautauqua Institution in 2008. In television, he was a special correspondent and producer for ABC's Nightline, and a correspondent for NOVA ScienceNow!

The adventure spans the world from Stonehenge to astronomically aligned pyramids at Giza, from Mayan observatories at Chichen Itza to the atomic clock in Washington, the world's official timekeeper since the 1960s. We visit cultures from Vedic India and Cleopatra's Egypt to Byzantium and the Elizabethan court; and meet an impressive cast of historic personages from Julius Caesar to Omar Khayyam, and giants of science from Galileo and Copernicus to Stephen Hawking. Our present calendar system predates the invention of the telescope, the mechanical clock, and the concept ol zero and its development is one of the great untold stories of science and history.

How did Pope Gregory set right a calendar which was in error by at least ten lull days? What did time mean to a farmer on the Rhine in 800 A.D.? What was daily life like in the Middle Ages, when the general population reckoned births and marriages by seasons, wars, kings'' reigns, and saints' days? In short, how did the world

The adventure spans the world from Stonehenge to astronomically aligned pyramids at Giza, from Mayan observatories at Chichen Itza to the atomic clock in Washington, the world's official timekeeper since the 1960s. We visit cultures from Vedic India and Cleopatra's Egypt to Byzantium and the Elizabethan court; and meet an impressive cast of historic personages from Julius Caesar to Omar Khayyam, and giants of science from Galileo and Copernicus to Stephen Hawking. Our present calendar system predates the invention of the telescope, the mechanical clock, and the concept ol zero and its development is one of the great untold stories of science and history. How did Pope Gregory set right a calendar which was in error by at least ten lull days? What did time mean to a farmer on the Rhine in 800 A.D.? What was daily life like in the Middle Ages, when the general population reckoned births and marriages by seasons, wars, kings'' reigns, and saints' days?
Ytli
Duncan covers the determination of time measurement via religious uses of the moon versus the more distinct use of the sun for agricultural ends. Also covered especially well and in great detail is the loss of curiosity and knowledge by the Europeans in the centuries following the collapse of Rome and the retention of much knowledge concerning time by both Arab and Indian cultures. Also covered are the struggle to have a common calendar world-wide (not resolved until 1752 for Britain and the American colonies and until after WWI for the Russians) and even the struggle to use numbers for the days of the months rather than the Roman kalends, nones, and ides. The list of players in this squabble is not only huge, it is intensely revealing in terms of preconceived notions.
Innadril
David Ewing Duncan has done a masterful job in telling the incredible tale of mankind's wrestling for centuries with something that is as basic, and as certainly inescapable, as air, water and food--the measurement of time.Not only is this book well researched it is a very readable history that doesn't waste a lot of the reader's time going down blind alleys. It is wonderful piece of history that is still unfolding--how many ways are there to tell time, who decides and what is being used as a measurement of time are open ended questions that I came away with. Fascinating stuff and Mr. Duncan succeded in gaining and holding my rapt attention all weekend. I am almost ready to reread this book already.
Zodama
This is not just a history of calendars or man's attempt to measure the passage of time. Duncan has managed to fit that story within the larger epic of man's struggle out of ignorance and barbarism, with occasional backslides as Huns, Vikings and Crusaders plundered the settled.
He really gives a thrilling account of the cumulative effect of learning, and has given me dozens of new historical junctures to explore. Anyone who can make history so fascinating is a good scholar and author indeed.
By the way, the errata reported by "oestens" of Norway (see below) apparently stems from oestens' confusion over "A.D." versus "B.C." The author got it right.
Adokelv
This book is deeply interesting and explains how we wound up with the calendar that we did. A Roman yearly calendar, pagan day names, with a week cycle that seems to have originated in Babylon, with a Christian year dating system. For anyone interested in this topic (and even those who aren't) I highly recommend this book.
Ochach
I read this book many years ago and loved it. It is about the history of numbers and maths as much as the history of the calendar and in a fascinating, non-technical way. I was keen to share it with my friends but got them to promise they would return it. Alas, one of them didn't and it is such a wonderful, helpful, useful book I just had to replace it. I've now put it away as a "surprise" Christmas present and look forward to reading it again over the holidays.
Samuhn
Great book!
Goodman
There is so very much information here that I hadn't realised until now. Also much info on changes the Catholic church made that I hadn't realised and that need to be questioned.
One of the best works of the history of the calender I have ever read. Lots of interesting facts.