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Author: Tom Maschler
ISBN: 0330484206
Subcategory: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Pages 256 pages
Publisher Pan Macmillan; First Edition edition (March 1, 2007)
Language English
Category: Reference
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 133
ePUB size: 1978 kb
FB2 size: 1596 kb
DJVU size: 1252 kb
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eBook Publisher download

by Tom Maschler


Tom Maschler - described as "the most important publisher in Britain; the most innovative, adventurous . His father, a commercial traveller in the book business and later a publisher of art books, joined them some time after

Tom Maschler - described as "the most important publisher in Britain; the most innovative, adventurous, and newsworthy" - was one of them; it went on to say that for nearly 20 years, "he made publishing glamorous and the aura h At the end of the millennium, the leading British industry magazine, 'The Bookseller', selected the ten people who had most influenced its century. His father, a commercial traveller in the book business and later a publisher of art books, joined them some time after. As a young man Tom wanted to be a film director, this despite his father extolling the virtues of being a publisher. Tom's view was, 'whatever profession I chose it would not be publishing'.

The Kurt Maschler Award (1982 to 1999) was a British literary award that annually recognised one "work of imagination for children, in which text and illustration are integrated so that each enhances and balances the other. Winning authors and illustrators received £1000 and a bronze figurine called the "Emil". The Award was founded by Kurt Maschler, best known as the publisher of Emil and the Detectives by Erich Kästner (1929)

Tom Maschler was five when his family fled the Nazis in Vienna and brought him to England.

Tom Maschler was five when his family fled the Nazis in Vienna and brought him to England. As a teenager, he travelled widely, worked on a kibbutz and did national service before going on to become one of the most dynamic figures in publishing. He worked with, and discovered, some of the world's most celebrated writers, created the Booker prize and has now written a memoir. Tom Maschler was five when his family fled the Nazis in Vienna and brought him to England.

Thomas Michael Maschler (born 16 August 1933) is a British publisher and writer. The son of Austrian Jews, he was five when his family fled to England from Vienna after the Nazi annexation of Austria (Anschluss). After Leighton Park School, he travelled widely, worked on a kibbutz and did national service before going on to work in publishing.

In his long career, Tom Maschler founded the Booker Prize and put into print icons from Hemingway and Heller to. .

In his long career, Tom Maschler founded the Booker Prize and put into print icons from Hemingway and Heller to Lennon and Amis. His memoir will be a literary event, says John Walsh. Wednesday 16 March 2005 01:00. Not that journalists were always easy to enlist as cheerleaders. If I rang Terry about something I was excited about, his attitude was, 'Jesus Christ, here he comes again'. He was very narrow-minded.

The collection was sold by Lennon’s British publisher Tom Maschler, who persuaded him to write the books. Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Thomas Michael Maschler is a British publisher and writer. One of Maschler"s earliest coups was purchasing Joseph Heller"s Catch 22 for £250. His memoir, Publisher, was published in 2005.

Tom Maschler is a British publisher and writer. The son of Austrian Jews, he was five when his family fled the Nazis in Vienna and brought him to England. In his role as head of Jonathan Cape, he discovered and published many writers including Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Ian McEwan and Bruce Chatwin to whom he acted as an informal patron.

ISBN 10: 0330484206 ISBN 13: 9780330484206. Publisher: Pan Macmillan, 2007.

At the end of the millennium, the leading British industry magazine, The Bookseller, selected the ten people who had most influenced its century. Tom Maschler—described as "the most important publisher in Britain; the most innovative, adventurous, and newsworthy"—was one of them. It went on to say that for nearly 20 years, "he made publishing glamorous." Over the course of his career, Maschler launched the careers of Thomas Pynchon, Joseph Heller, Gabriel García Márquez, Julian Barnes, Ian McEwan, Martin Amis, and Bruce Chatwin, among others. From the party where Norman Mailer stabbed his wife to the porch where Ernest Hemingway shot himself, this frank and fascinating memoir affords a rare glimpse into the golden days of British publishing. An extraordinary literary memoir by one great publishers of the 20th century.
Shomeshet
I enjoyed the book. It's anecdote-laden & short on introspection but interesting overall & very well written. Piquant glimpses into the personalities of lots of famous authors. T.M. was 'there' through a time of wonderful literary flowering.
Yllk
Tom Maschler's life story: how he became editorial director of moribund publisher Jonathan Cape in his twenties after an apprenticeship with legendary Penguin publisher Allen Lane, transformed their fortunes by innovative and creative publishing of literary fiction and intellectually groudbreaking non fiction, founded one of the worlds most well known literary prizes, the Booker Prize, and published a vast number of the great and good writers of the last few decades, is so remarkable that it is impossible to mess up. That said, Maschler makes a pretty good fist of it. His writing style is plain and un-self aware to the point of autism, he name drops famous writers like a glossy magazine columnist and clearly fancies himself as a raconteur, a bon viveur, though clearly he has upset many more people than he realizes. Many stories end along the lines of: and he/she never spoke to me again. I can't help thinking I am owed an explanation.

Mashcler's monstrous ego aside (at one typical comically un-self aware moment he writes of the pride he felt when a secretary said she could feel his presence in the Cape building even when she hadn't seen him arrive), his contribution to publishing is undiminished. He worked tirelessly to promote serious and intelligent books, and had a remarkable talent for spreading a buzz about his titles like bushfire through the publishing world. Publishers and booksellers knew that with Maschler behind a title you were guaranteed a: quality and b: (more important in publishing) sales. All this for comparatively little financial reward himself. Towards the end he writes of the buy out of Jonathan Cape by Random House when it could no longer survive as an independent company. Buy that stage, Maschler and his managing director were paying themselves only £40,000 a year, far less than many of his authors were earning as a result of Maschler's tireless support.

Maschler will go down as one of the post war greats of the British publishing world (though equally is important is Liz Calder (now of Harry Potter house Bloomsbury), also vital to the Cape story and chronically undermentioned by Maschler. He mainly takes gleeful spite in boasting of authors he poached from Liz at her expense. Perhaps it is the case that good publishers make good writers, but great ones can't string a sentence together (for that is why they publish, rather than write). The entrepreneurial flair of the Maschler's of this world don't often go hand in hand with reflective, literary skills. Maschler's life story will be magnificently told one day, but by an authorized biographer, rather than the man himself.