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eBook Neither Angels nor Demons: Women, Crime, and Victimization (Northeastern Series on Gender, Crime, and Law) download
Reference
Author: Kathleen Ferraro
ISBN: 1555536638
Subcategory: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Pages 344 pages
Publisher Northeastern; First Edition edition (November 30, 2006)
Language English
Category: Reference
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 903
ePUB size: 1155 kb
FB2 size: 1433 kb
DJVU size: 1905 kb
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eBook Neither Angels nor Demons: Women, Crime, and Victimization (Northeastern Series on Gender, Crime, and Law) download

by Kathleen Ferraro


Few understand violence against women as deeply as Kathleen Ferraro.

Few understand violence against women as deeply as Kathleen Ferraro. Neither Angels nor Demons exposes the pain, the ambivalence, the ‘making sense’ of living with violence. Ferraro challenges us all to begin to think outside of the criminal processing box, and inside a world that must imagine nonviolence. In Neither Angels nor Demons, Northern Arizona University sociology professor Kathleen Ferraro draws from decades of experience with victims of intimate partner violence to offer a nuanced perspective of women who commit crimes in the context of violent relationships.

Ferraro begins with a general discussion of blurred boundaries and the complexity of experience, and moves from there to discuss women's interactions with the criminal processing system.

Neither Angels nor Demons book. Start by marking Neither Angels nor Demons: Women, Crime, and Victimization (Northeastern Series on Gender, Crime, and Law) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Neither Angels nor Demons: Women, Crime, and Victimization (Northeastern Series on Gender, Crime, and Law). by. Kathleen Ferraro. Start by marking Neither Angels Nor Demons: Women, Crime, and Victimization as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. Neither Angels Nor Demons: Women, Crime, and Victimization. Kathleen J. Ferraro.

She is a criminal offender, a woman who has harmed others. Superficially, it seems she is two separate women. Victim" and "offender" are binary categories used within law, social science, and public discourse to describe social experiences with a moral dimension.

Xi, 327 p. ; 23 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 291-313) and index. Introduction - Blurred boundaries and the complexities of experience - Irreconcilable differences : women's encounters with the criminal processing system - Negotiating surreality - The social reproduction of women's pain - Demonic angels? : violence against abusers - Angelic demons? : crimes of complicity - Epilogue.

Description this book Neither Angels Nor Demons A provocative study of the complex relationship between domestic violence and women s crime. Women, Crime, and Victimization (Northeastern Series on Gender, Crime, and Law) (Kathleen Ferraro ) PDF Free Free Read Download Neither Angels nor Demons: Women, Crime, and Victimization (Northeastern Series on Gender, Crime, and Law) (Kathleen Ferraro ) PDF Free E-Reader Download Download Neither Angels nor Demons: Women, Crime, and Victimization (Northeastern Series on Gender, Crime, and Law) (Kathleen Ferraro ) PDF Free in English.

University Press of New England, 2006.

Neither Angels nor Demons: Women, Crime, and Victimization. University Press of New England, 2006.

Freeing Tammy Women, Drugs, and Incarceration Northeastern Series on Gender, Crime, and Law. C Floyd. Boston: Northeastern University Press. Gender, Crime and Desistance: Toward a Theory of Cognitive Transformation. Giordano, P. Cernokovich, S. & Rudolph, J. L. (2002). American Journal of Sociology, 107, 990–1064. CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

She is a victim of intimate partner violence, a woman who has been harmed. She is a criminal offender, a woman who has harmed others. Superficially, it seems she is two separate women. “Victim” and “offender” are binary categories used within law, social science, and public discourse to describe social experiences with a moral dimension. Such terms draw upon cultural narratives of good and bad people and have influenced scholarship, public policy, and activism. The duality of “good” and “bad” women, separated into mutually exclusive extremes of angels and demons, has helped segregate thinking about, and responses to, each group. In this groundbreaking study, Kathleen J. Ferraro exposes the limits of such thinking by exploring the link between victimization and offending from the perspective of the women charged with the crimes. Interviewing forty-five women charged with criminal offenses (more than half of whom killed their abusers; the others participated in a range of violent crimes related to domestic violence), Ferraro uses their stories to illuminate complex interactions with violent partners, their children, and the legal system. She shows that these women are neither stereotypical angels nor demons, but rather human beings whose complicated lives belie the abstract categorizations of researchers, legal advocates, and the criminal justice system. Ferraro begins with a general discussion of blurred boundaries and the complexity of experience, and moves from there to discuss women’s interactions with the criminal processing system. In the course of her study, she reexamines, and finds wanting, many standard ways of evaluating women’s violent behavior, including “mutual combat,” “battered woman syndrome,” and “cycle of violence.” She argues that a more complex, nuanced understanding of intimate partner violence and how it contributes to women’s offending will contribute to public policy less focused on control and accountability of individuals than on developing social conditions that promote everyone’s safety and well-being and foster a sense of hope.
Mopimicr
...and read this book.

In Neither Angels nor Demons, Northern Arizona University sociology professor Kathleen Ferraro draws from decades of experience with victims of intimate partner violence to offer a nuanced perspective of women who commit crimes in the context of violent relationships. Ferraro includes descriptions of interviews with 45 women whose criminal offenses range from drug trafficking to aggravated murder. The experiences of these women, she points out, defy popular notions of what it means to be a “battered woman” or a criminal offender; the bizarre and terrifying context of relationship violence makes it difficult to classify them in such a binary manner. Popular conceptualizations of domestic violence, as well as rigid legal and social definitions, rely on simplistic and unexamined beliefs about the causes and nature of domestic violence. Ferraro debunks problematic labels such as “battered women’s syndrome,” the “cycle of violence,” and “learned helplessness,” drawing from social theorists including Weber and Foucault to explain how our history and cultural archive have contributed to an environment in which women are expected to conform to male authority and “police” their behavior in a manner appealing to their male partners. Ferraro appears to conceive of the women she interviews as rational actors who are navigating dangerous and surreal waters, coping with the effects of economic strain and childhood trauma, and using their own expert knowledge of their partners’ violent behaviors and potential in their efforts to stop the violence -- by any means necessary. Indeed, they are neither angels nor demons.

Ferraro's book will be groundbreaking for those who think they have a complete understanding of domestic violence. Much advocacy work has sought to "break the cycle" when in fact "the cycle" is hardly a simple reproduction of learned behavior. Moreover, this book is utterly fascinating, impeccably researched, and at about 250 pages, very easy to read. Highly recommended!
Delalbine
Great book. I didn't get to read it all but it was a very good book. I still have it in my apartment so I may just finish it.
Kazigrel
This book is essentially "Avoiding Responsibility for your Life Decisions 101". With this book you too can learn how to explain your poor life decisions as everyone else's fault (society, your parents, the patriachy) but only if you are a female because males are the root of every poor decision that is ever made. Are you a drug addict? An alcoholic? Did you viciously attack or kill another person? Well not to worry, this book will explain how none of that is your fault and the system is just out to get you. Did you decide to leave a healthy, unabusive marriage to be a groupie in a biker gang where you are beaten and treated like property because you were bored? Not your fault either! Read this book to find out how.