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Politics
Author: Jedediah Purdy
ISBN: 0375407081
Subcategory: Sociology
Pages 256 pages
Publisher Knopf; 1 edition (August 31, 1999)
Language English
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 536
ePUB size: 1565 kb
FB2 size: 1782 kb
DJVU size: 1931 kb
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eBook For Common Things: Irony, Trust, and Commitment in America Today download

by Jedediah Purdy


Jedediah Purdy calls For Common Things his "letter of love for the world's possibilities

Jedediah Purdy calls For Common Things his "letter of love for the world's possibilities. Indeed, these pages-which have already garnered a flurry of attention among readers and in the media-constitute a passionate and persuasive testament to the value of political, social, and community reengagement. Drawing on a wide range of literary and cultural influences-from the writings of Montaigne and Thoreau to the recent popularity of empty entertainment and breathless chroniclers of the technological age-Purdy raises potent questions about our stewardship of civic values.

Jedediah Purdy calls For Common Things his "letter of love for the world's possibilities

Jedediah Purdy calls For Common Things his "letter of love for the world's possibilities. Drawing on a wide range of literary and cultural influences-from the Jedediah Purdy calls For Common Things his "letter of love for the world's possibilities

For Common Things offers lessons in the extraction of hope from a weary, wry world, a hope tempered with terse pragmatism and edged by love.

Americans who came of age after 1974, writes Jedediah Purdy, have never seen the government undertake a large-scale project other than highway maintenance and small wars, and relatively few are inspired by the idea that it should. For Common Things contains a fascinating evaluation of private life and freedom, updating Alexis de Tocqueville with chilling urgency. nything that individuals could not accomplish in solitude would fall to bureaucrats. For Common Things offers lessons in the extraction of hope from a weary, wry world, a hope tempered with terse pragmatism and edged by love.

Includes bibliographical references (p. -215) and index. Avoiding the world - The absence of politics - The practice of the public - The law of the land: political choice and attentiveness - The neighbor and the machine : technology and responsibility - Irony and ecstasy. Jedediah Purdy persuasively argues the necessity and satisfactions of social and political reengagement and of renewed attention to the "common things" we all have a stake in: the environment, education, culture, law, and government.

Given the cynicism rampant in America today, Jedediah Purdy's endeavor may seem quixotic. Homeschooled in rural West Virginia, Purdy went on to study at Harvard; this dual experience fuels his lucid and often unsettling observations. But he persuasively argues the necessity and satisfactions of social and political reengagement and of renewed attention to the "common things" we all have a stake in: the environment, education, culture, law, and government. His thinking is fresh, his tone civil, his criticism constructive.

Jedediah Purdy calls For Common Things his "letter of love for the world's possibilities. Indeed, these pages-which garnered a flurry of attention among readers and in the media-constitute a passionate and persuasive testament to the value of political, social, and community reengagement.

For Common Things was merged with this page. Arguing for renewed attention to "common things", Purdy gives a ringing and heartfelt plea for commitment to-and faith in-American civic and political life. 5 people like this topic.

Jedediah Purdy talked about his book For Common Things: Irony, Trust, and Commitment in America Today, published by Knopf. The book addresses the under-35 generation, exhorting civic commitment and responsibility

Jedediah Purdy talked about his book For Common Things: Irony, Trust, and Commitment in America Today, published by Knopf. The book addresses the under-35 generation, exhorting civic commitment and responsibility. He also talked about current political issues and his views on government.

Irony, Trust, and Commitment in America Today. Jedediah Purdy teaches law at Duke University and has also taught at Yale and Harvard. Irony, Trust, and Commitment in America Today. Purdy is the author of For Common Things: Irony, Trust, and Commitment in America Today and Being America: Liberty, Commerce, and Violence in an America. ore about Jedediah Purdy.

Unusual and impressive, this is a twenty-four-year-old writer's ringing and heartfelt plea for renewed commitment to--and faith in--American civic and political life.Given the cynicism rampant in America today, Jedediah Purdy's endeavor may seem quixotic. But he persuasively argues the necessity and satisfactions of social and political reengagement and of renewed attention to the "common things" we all have a stake in: the environment, education, culture, law, and government. Drawing on a wide range of sources--from Thoreau to Seinfeld--he contemplates such questions as the use of irony in popular culture, the breakdown of our political processes, and the moral and legal dilemmas posed by technological advances. In these and other discussions, he lures us away from disbelief and detachment toward a sincere devotion to the healing and betterment of society.Homeschooled in rural West Virginia, Purdy went on to study at Harvard; this dual experience fuels his lucid and often unsettling observations. His thinking is fresh, his tone civil, his criticism constructive. What he suggests is that we can hope for a sound society if we work for it: each of us is responsible for the common good and for upholding the integrity of common things. This is an engaging, honest, and bracing reminder of what it is that we value in our society, and of our responsibility to preserve it.
Falya
This book's purpose is to be a wake-up call for all of us who grew complacent to what happens with our society. It tries to explain how our focus on our particular lives, with disregard to politics and social life, affects our society and makes a plea for us to be more involved in society at core levels (politics, education, etc.).
Even if it is written more than 10 years ago, it is still actual, not only in American society, but also in nascent democracies, like the ones in Eastern Europe. The author also provides an image of how democracy turned to be after the fall of Communism in Central and Eastern Europe, where only few dissidents stood by and fought for their beliefs, while people just went on with their lives, leading to massive corruption and lawlessness. It should be a warning sign for all those who think that being distant about what happens in politics might keep the status quo, but not being involved as a citizen might lead to power being split only between few.
For me it was a good read and I would recommend it to anyone who wants to see the society nowadays through the eyes of a non-ironic and what might be the consequences of non-commitment in social life, even in the most renown and strong democracy in the world.
Thoginn
The ideas in this book are very interesting and give words to the subconscious and formerly unspoken idea of social apathy - in the form of Purdy's ironists. These observations, while not original, are quite well discussed. Purdy is an exemplary expository writer, discussing various very complicated ideas, and addressing in words the emotional undertone of American society. My only criticism is that it is very apparent that Purdy grew up in a small town, in a pastoral farm setting in West Virginia, and was home-schooled. Detachment from the "normal" American experience gives him an outsider's perspective; while I can appreciate his passion against strip-mining for coal in West-Virginia, I can't related. He misses the very relevant reality of American life. Furthermore, I find something ironic in an ivy-league lawyer writing about the American experience of social apathy when his idyllic rearing experience was far removed from the average American's more provincial or urban upbringing. Rather, Purdy comes across as somewhat of an ivy-league elitist that is pedantic in his opinions and naive in his view (but, I mean that in a good way). Understand, that to criticize this book is my highest form of flattery. I am not at all bashing Purdy. I wholly recommend reading this book and encourage more of this form of expression.
Gholbithris
Jedediah Purdy's For Common Things goes on my bookshelf waiting for future works of this un-common young man who wrestles and struggles with concepts that are all to often foreign to his peers. At age 24 Mr. Purdy seems to be ready for a trip to China where his disposition towards understanding and optimism would be understood; nurtured and expanded. His fierce talent and passion will evolve over time into something special, I believe. Perhaps the twentysomething crowd up will wear Jedediah's commitment to being visible and active in their community as their new red badge of courage. Less Seinfeld and Wired magazine and more Jedediah Purdy somehow seems like a good thing to kick off the new millennium.
Stylish Monkey
Jedediah again challenges us to think of common things such as kindness and caring at a deeper level. We are then challenged to look through and around the 'crud' that makes up so much of our world rather than leaping into the slime only to re-surface some years later laughing about the irony of living but not living. A fellow reviewer was angry that Mr. Purdy did not include global air quality as a common thing. I think Mr. Purdy is only suggesting that if we can not really look and be dazzled by a childs little fingers and big smile then ...we just may not ever be able to fully comprehend global air quality or really much of anything outside our own little world of trying to laugh about the crud that makes up our list of daily challenges. I see this book as a little guide for quality living and a new way of thinking. I for one will be watching and waiting for Jedediah to challenge me again. If you work with children... buy this book.
Reemiel
I'm a bit puzzled here. I've read forty reviews of this thoughtful and penetrating thesis and I can't recall a single insightful comment, not even from the pundits at Kirkus and Booklist. I DO know this: Purdy went to HARVARD. He's from WEST VIRGINIA. He's YOUNG, God forbid. And, more importantly, he's ferociously intelligent and sincere.
This book is not a biography, so why are so many of you concerned about it? I've a suspicion that many people feel so threatened by Jed's formidable bio that they become defensive immediately. Here's a hint: Read this book for what it says. If the only thing you can remember about it after finishing is that Jed went to Harvard, you need to learn to read past the jacket blurbs. Here's another hint: erudition, social concern, and curiosity are all good things.
Scream_I LOVE YOU
Purdy is a national treasure~! A great critical thinker~! Wonderful food-for-thought book. Buy it, read it, think~!
Highly recommended~!