» » The Unfinished Revolution: Coming of Age in a New Era of Gender, Work, and Family
eBook The Unfinished Revolution: Coming of Age in a New Era of Gender, Work, and Family download
Politics
Author: Kathleen Gerson
ISBN: 0195371674
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Pages 320 pages
Publisher Oxford University Press; 1 edition (December 15, 2009)
Language English
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 335
ePUB size: 1977 kb
FB2 size: 1440 kb
DJVU size: 1741 kb
Other formats: doc lrf txt azw

eBook The Unfinished Revolution: Coming of Age in a New Era of Gender, Work, and Family download

by Kathleen Gerson


While politics seeks to freeze and distort and polarize the change, Gerson shows a textured, flexible, uncertain and shifting reality that challenges all our assumptions.

Gerson Kathleen (EN). In the controversial public debate over modern American families, the vast changes in family life-the rise of single, two-paycheck, and same-sex parents-have often been blamed for declining morality and unhappy children.

The Unfinished Revolution book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Unfinished Revolution: Coming of Age in a New Era of Gender, Work, and Family as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The Unfinished Revolution offers clear recommendations for the kinds of workplace and community changes that would best bring about a more egalitarian family life – a new flexibility at work and at home that benefits families, encourages a thriving economy, and helps women.

The Unfinished Revolution offers clear recommendations for the kinds of workplace and community changes that would best bring about a more egalitarian family life – a new flexibility at work and at home that benefits families, encourages a thriving economy, and helps women and men integrate love and work. Work and Occupations.

Kathleen Gerson is Professor of Sociology and Collegiate Professor of Arts and Science at New York University. The author of No Man's Land: Men's Changing Commitments to Family and Work and Hard Choices: How Women Decide about Work, Career, and Motherhood, she frequently contributes to such media as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, National Public Radio, and CNN. Funda kabanzi.

Another great book by Kathleen Gerson! In her exploration of work, family, gender change among young adults, she concludes with two major findings. First, the families that are the most successful are those that are the most flexible. Rather than adhering to rigid gender roles, these families are able to adjust behaviors based on their families' particular circumstances, which are bound to change over the life course

Gerson conducted in-depth interviews with 120 men and women between the ages of 18 and 32. Her subjects came from a wide variety of family backgrounds, and many experienced significant transformations in family structure over the course of their lives due to changes in employment, marriage and divorce. Despite their diversity, some common themes emerged.

In The Unfinished Revolution Gerson examines how 'social shifts have created both opportunities for gender . The book is divided into two sections: the first examines the different childhoods the respondents experienced.

In The Unfinished Revolution Gerson examines how 'social shifts have created both opportunities for gender flexibility and new conflicts between breadwinning and caretaking' (p. 99). Using data from in-depth interviews with 120 young adults in the United States she looks at how they are using their experiences of growing up during the 'gender revolution' of the 1980s to shape their own lives. Part two looks at how the young people are building their adult lives based around what they learnt from their own family backgrounds.

Автор: Gerson Kathleen Название: The Unfinished Revolution: Coming of. .

The Unfinished Revolution makes clear recommendations for a new flexibility at work and at home that benefits families, encourages athriving economy, and helps women and men integrate love and work

The gender revolution is not in a stall. The Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 guaranteed covered workers up to 12 weeks unpaid leave after a child’s birth or adoption or in case of a family illness. Although only about half the total work force was eligible, it seemed a promising start.

In the controversial public debate over modern American families, the vast changes in family life--the rise of single, two-paycheck, and same-sex parents--have often been blamed for declining morality and unhappy children. Drawing upon pioneering research with the children of the gender revolution, Kathleen Gerson reveals that it is not a lack of "family values," but rigid social and economic forces that make it difficult to have a vibrant and committed family and work life. Despite the entrance of women into the workforce and the blurring of once clearly defined gender boundaries, men and women live in a world where the demands of balancing parenting and work, autonomy and commitment, time and money are left largely unresolved. Gerson finds that while an overwhelming majority of young men and women see an egalitarian balance within committed relationships as the ideal, today's social and economic realities remain based on conventional--and now obsolete--distinctions between breadwinning and caretaking. In this equity vacuum, men and women develop conflicting strategies, with women stressing self-reliance and men seeking a new traditionalism. With compassion for all perspectives, Gerson argues that whether one decides to give in to traditionally imbalanced relationships or to avoid marriage altogether, these approaches are second-best responses, not personal preferences or inherent attributes, and they will shift if new options can be created to help people achieve their egalitarian aspirations. The Unfinished Revolution offers clear recommendations for the kinds of workplace and community changes that would best bring about a more egalitarian family life--a new flexibility at work and at home that benefits families, encourages a thriving economy, and helps women and men integrate love and work. Praise for the Hardcover:"Over the past three decades, social change has blown apart the old-fashioned ideal of the nuclear family--and Gerson has set out to map where the pieces have landed."--New York Post"Valuable for the abundance and candor of the testimony from this unmoored generation pioneering through radically altered conceptions of personal and professional life."--Publishers Weekly"This is not a battle that can be won with legal challenges or legislation. Yes, it would undoubtedly be greatly aided by the passage of major social policies such as universal child care. But at its core, this is a fight that plays out within homes and between partners. And as Gerson's research makes clear, the fight has not changed all that dramatically in the past 30 years." --The American Prospect
Doulkree
Fast delivery, great quality, and cheap! Why would you buy books for school anywhere else?
Dozilkree
Item is good and as described.
Anasius
Another great book by Kathleen Gerson! In her exploration of work, family, gender change among young adults, she concludes with two major findings. First, the families that are the most successful are those that are the most flexible. Rather than adhering to rigid gender roles, these families are able to adjust behaviors based on their families' particular circumstances, which are bound to change over the life course. Second, she finds that the majority of respondents (age 18-31) desire an egalitarian relationship, but that they are circumspect about their chances of actually being able to live their desires. They understand that competing demands from an inflexible work place and home make this prospect extremely difficult. So they settle for second best. Gerson breaks down how women and men come to conclusions about what is second best and why this differs by gender. These are big findings on a subject that tends to be driven more by ideology than by empirical evidence! This book is worth a read in order to understand how young men and women understand and react to the social factors that continue to make egalitarian relationships out of reach for most families. It is well-written and the interviews are enlightening for anyone interested in learning about how men and women make decisions about family life.
jorik
Required book for a class, but found it fascinating!
Katius
Good book, I recommend you read, came in good condition and on time. Thank You
Kanrad
Great Price, Speedy Delivery - Thanks!
Kigul
Used this book as a supplemental reading for an college, upper level Marriage and Family course. Students responded well to it and found it to be an easy read.
I read this for a work-family course, and it just felt extremely unimportant to me. It was story after story after story that just kind of brought up different points and didn't seem too get anywhere. Got confused with all the different people talking about their stories, and never really felt anything anyone said in the book to be particularly insightful.

I mean it was interesting for the first few pages, but it's just kind of, well... listening to people complain or simply talk about their family for the entire length of the book.