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eBook Back to Africa: Benjamin Coates and the Colonization Movement in America, 1848–1880 download
Politics
Author: Emma J. Lapsansky-Werner,Margaret Hope Bacon
ISBN: 0271026847
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Pages 368 pages
Publisher Penn State University Press (October 28, 2005)
Language English
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 414
ePUB size: 1479 kb
FB2 size: 1717 kb
DJVU size: 1482 kb
Other formats: azw mobi docx lit

eBook Back to Africa: Benjamin Coates and the Colonization Movement in America, 1848–1880 download

by Emma J. Lapsansky-Werner,Margaret Hope Bacon


Benjamin Coates was one of the best-known white supporters of African .

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Benjamin Coates was one of the best-known white supporters of African colonization in nineteenth-century America. A Quaker businessman from Philadelphia and a sometime officer of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

Benjamin Coates was one of the best-known white supporters of African colonization in nineteenth-century America.

Benjamin Coates and the American Colonization Movement. The year 1848 marks the beginning of Coates' friendship with Roberts, and of Roberts' presidency of Liberia, as the west African country becomes an independent republic

Benjamin Coates and the American Colonization Movement. by Emma J. Lapsansky-Werner and Margaret Hope Bacon. The Colonizationist Correspondence of Benjamin Coates. The year 1848 marks the beginning of Coates' friendship with Roberts, and of Roberts' presidency of Liberia, as the west African country becomes an independent republic.

Request PDF On May 1, 2007, Kate Masur and others published Back to Africa: Benjamin Coates and the .

Do you want to read the rest of this article? Request full-text. In 1816, a group of elite white men founded the American Colonization Society (ACS), an organization committed to sending free African Americans outside the bounds of the nation. By 1821, the ACS had secured federal funding for the project and purchased land for the new black colony of Liberia in West Africa. Back to Africa sheds new light on these remarkable personalities and their tireless efforts at reform. A Quaker businessman from Philadelphia and a sometime officer of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, he was committed to helping black Americans relocate to West Africa.

Margaret Hope Bacon (born Margaret Hope Borchardt; April 7, 1921 .

Margaret Hope Bacon (born Margaret Hope Borchardt; April 7, 1921 – February 24, 2011) was an American Quaker historian, author and lecturer. She is primarily known for her biographies and works involving Quaker women’s history and the abolitionist movement  . Back to Africa: Benjamin Coates and the colonization movement in America, 1848-1880 But one race: the life of Robert Purvis (2007).

Kate Masur, Emma J. Lapsansky-Werner, Margaret Hope Bacon. Published: 1 May 2007. in The Journal of Southern History. The Journal of Southern History, Volume 73; doi:10. Keywords: Africa, Benjamin Coates, Colonization Movement in America.

Title : Back to Africa Benjamin Coates and the colonization movement in America 1848-1880 Year : 2005

Authors : Lapsansky-Werner Emma J. - Hope Bacon Margaret - Chalufour Marc - Miller Benjamin B. - Rajan Meenakshi Title : Back to Africa Benjamin Coates and the colonization movement in America 1848-1880 Year : 2005. Beginning-we believe-with immigration from Asia tens of thousands of years ago, continuing with immigration from Europe and Africa several centuries ago, then picking up velocity in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries, a diverse collage of peoples and cultures have created a heterogeneous mix on the North American continent. A Quaker businessman from Philadelphia, and a sometime officer of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, he was committed to helping Black Americans relocate to West Africa. At the heart of the volume is a collection of over 150 recently recovered letters, either written by Coates or addressed to him between 1848 and 1880, the years when Coates was most active in racial reform.

Benjamin Coates was one of the best-known white supporters of African colonization in nineteenth-century America. A Quaker businessman from Philadelphia and a sometime officer of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, he was committed to helping black Americans relocate to West Africa. This put him at the center of a discourse with abolitionists at home and abroad, including such leading thinkers as Joseph Jenkins Roberts, Mary Ann Shadd Cary, Henry Highland Garnet, Frederick Douglass, Alexander Crummell, George L. Stearns, and William Coppinger.

Creative and restless, cantankerous and charismatic, these men and women dominated the struggle to end slavery and to achieve respect for African Americans. Back to Africa sheds new light on these remarkable personalities and their tireless efforts at reform.