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eBook Indian New England Before the Mayflower download
Politics
Author: Howard S. Russell
ISBN: 0874512557
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Pages 296 pages
Publisher UPNE; Reprint edition (June 15, 1980)
Language English
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 758
ePUB size: 1527 kb
FB2 size: 1711 kb
DJVU size: 1132 kb
Other formats: lrf mobi lit lrf

eBook Indian New England Before the Mayflower download

by Howard S. Russell


Indian New England Before. has been added to your Cart. Russell many times over fulfills his goal of dispelling 'the all too common notion of native New England as peopled by a handful of savages wandering in a trackless wilderness'. New England Quarterly.

Indian New England Before. The author has used many original sources, including very rare notes and observations made during the initial contact period between Europeans and the Indians of New England. The book is rich in illustrations and maps, and should be appreciated by both professionals, students and the general reader.

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Start by marking Indian New England Before the Mayflower as Want to Read . great book full of interesting stuff. i suppose it might be only super interesting to people from new england, who knows.

Start by marking Indian New England Before the Mayflower as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Details (if other): Cancel. Mar 01, 2019 Jeffrey Williams rated it really liked it. Shelves: history, new-england. Shelves: new-england, history.

HOWARD S. RUSSELL had a lifelong interest in New England's earliest inhabitants, dating back to boyhood discoveries of occasional Indian artifacts in his family's plowed fields

HOWARD S. RUSSELL had a lifelong interest in New England's earliest inhabitants, dating back to boyhood discoveries of occasional Indian artifacts in his family's plowed fields.

In offering here a highly readable yet comprehensive description of New England's Indians as they lived when European settlers first met them, the author provides a well-rounded picture of the natives as neither savages nor heroes, but fellow human beings existing at a particular time and in a particular environment. He dispels once and for all the common notion of native New England as peopled by a handful of savages wandering in a trackless wilderness

In offering here a highly readable yet comprehensive description of New England's Indians as they lived when European settlers first met them, the author provides a well-rounded picture of the natives as neither savages nor heroes, but fellow human beings existing at a particular time and in a particular environment. He dispels once and for all the common notion of native New England as peopled by a handful of savages wandering in a trackless wilderness.

by Howard S. Russell. In offering here a highly readable yet comprehensive description of New England's Indians as they lived when European settlers first met them, the author provides a well-rounded picture of the natives as neither savages nor heroes, but fellow human beings existing at a particular time and in a particular environment.

In offering here a highly readable yet comprehensive description of New England's Indians as they lived when European settlers first met them, the author provides a well-rounded picture of the natives as neither savages nor heroes, but fellow human beings existing at a particular time and in a particular environment. He dispels once and for all the common notion of native New England as peopled by a handful of savages wandering in a trackless wilderness.In sketching the picture the author has had help from such early explorers as Verrazano, Champlain, John Smith, and a score of literate sailors; Pilgrims and Puritans; settlers, travelers, military men, and missionaries. A surprising number of these took time and trouble to write about the new land and the characteristics and way of life of its native people. A second major background source has been the patient investigations of modern archaeologists and scientists, whose several enthusiastic organizations sponsor physical excavations and publications that continually add to our perception of prehistoric men and women, their habits, and their environment.This account of the earlier New Englanders, of their land and how they lived in it and treated it; their customs, food, life, means of livelihood, and philosophy of life will be of interest to all general audiences concerned with the history of Native Americans and of New England.
Kefrannan
Learned a lot good info about New England Indians
Keath
Very good. Thank you.
Malara
Good one-volume summary of New England native people's pre-settlement. If you are interested in getting some good basics under your belt, this is a fine place to start. For me, the bibliography and notes were the most useful portion as it lead me to lots of other great reading and resources!

Also, this book was published in 1980 and therefore may fall short on some subjects that have received revision in the last 35 years.
Dagdage
Students used it
Bukus
Good text for someone new to contact era indian history. Not too complicated but covers all the basics. On the other hand not much information that isn't available from numerous other sources.
Molace
very simple, concise, could have more indepth history, but as a starting manual its really good and well worth perusing on the beach or before a fire.
Velan
This book is fantastic. I am learning so much that
I find myself rereading it. Very helpful for trying to
recreate the time. I'm not 100% sure if the Indians
will concur on all of it, yet it seems right on so far.
Of course I was attracted to this book for all the reasons you are, and it does present some interesting insights into aboriginal life in our region. Mr. Russell is strongest in is knowledge of Algonquian vocabulary and on the subjects of hunting and cultivation. Prepare yourself for an extensive discussion of maize. And who knew that the Pamola was "the spirit of the night air?" The reader will be disappointed, however, in the shallow treatment of arts and clothing. Illustrations are principally rough sketches, and some of the few photos are of museum dioramas. One illustration shows tools "possibly used to remove bark from trees," though those tools appear identical to what are called pestles for grinding maize in other illustrations and photos. Readers with high regard for science should completely skip the chapter titled "Health and Illness," because it is infuriating. It is one thing to report the Indians' superstitions, and quite another to endorse them. Even so, Mr. Russell's confusing superstition for fact shows up in other chapters, and detracts from the book's value. He shouldn't say that wild animals are known to eat tobacco as a remedy for snakebite if there is not the slightest evidence to support it. And to suggest, as he does, that "certain medicine men were especially sensitive to atmospheric pressure changes and relative humidity," enabling them to predict rain two days away is, well, irresponsible, and detracts from Mr. Russell's overall scholarship. Still, I rate the book a three out of five, because anyone with such an obvious affection for the New England Indian is a kindred spirit.