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eBook Walking on Water: Black American Lives at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century download
Politics
Author: Randall Kenan
ISBN: 067973788X
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Pages 688 pages
Publisher Vintage; Reprint edition (February 22, 2000)
Language English
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 930
ePUB size: 1106 kb
FB2 size: 1679 kb
DJVU size: 1500 kb
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eBook Walking on Water: Black American Lives at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century download

by Randall Kenan


Walking On Water book.

Walking On Water book. This delicious and diverse sampler of African American life culled. This delicious and diverse sampler of African American life culled from over 200 interviews by author Randall Kenan shows that the American idea of "blackness" is as vast as the United States itself and cannot be pinned down to simplistic sociological clichés. I am asking who we ar.

Randall Kenan is an American author who was born March 12, 1963 in Brooklyn, New York. Walking on Water: Black American Lives at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century, Alfred A. Knopf, 1999; Vintage, 2000. Nominated for the Southern Book Award. At only six weeks old, Kenan moved to Duplin County, a small rural community in North Carolina, where he lived with his grandparents in a small town named Wallace. The setting of many of Kenan's novels are centered around his homeland of North Carolina. The focus of much of Kenan's work centers around on what it means to be black and gay in the southern United States.

Information about the book, Walking on Water: Black American Lives at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century: the Nonfiction, Paperback, by Randall Kenan (Vintage, Feb 22, 2000). From the author of the National Book Critics Circle Award finalist Let the Dead Bury Their Dead comes a moving, clich -shattering group portrait of African Americans at the turn of the twenty-first century. In a hypnotic blend of oral history and travel writing, Randall Kenan sets out to answer a question that has has long fascinated him: What does it mean to be black in America today?

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Geographic Name: United States Race relations Anecdotes. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Walking on water : Black American lives at the turn of the twenty-first century, Randall Kenan.

Walking on Water: Black American Lives at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century was published by Alfred A. Knopf in 1999, and was nominated for the Southern Book Award. The Fire this Time, a work of nonfiction, was published in July 2007. In 1989 he began teaching writing at Sarah Lawrence College and Columbia University.

Randall Kenan talked about his book, Walking on Water: Black American Lives at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century, published by Knopf. For six years he traveled around the . interviewing almost 200 African-Americans from a wide variety of backgrounds. The interviews focused on the self perception of being African-American in America. He started his journey on Martha’s Vineyard, traveled through New England, then headed west to visit Chicago, Minneapolis, Las Vegas and Seattle. Mr. Kenan ended his journey in North Carolina, where he recounts his own family’s story.

This delicious and diverse sampler of African American life culled from over 200 interviews by author Randall Kenan shows that the American idea of blackness i. .

Walking on Water: Black American Lives at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century, Alfred A. The Fire This Time, Melville House Publishing, 2007. ISBN 978-1933633244).

Walking on Water: Black American Lives at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century", Alfred A. Knopf, 1999; Vintage . Like other national literatures, American literature was shaped by the history of the country that produced it. For almost a century and . Universalium

Walking on Water: Black American Lives at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century", Alfred A. Knopf, 1999; Vintage, 2000 (ISBN 0-679-73788-X). "The Fire This Time", Melvill Pubns, 2007 (ISBN 978-1933633244). Universalium. List of African American writers - This is a list of African American authors and writers, all of whom are considered part of African American literature.

"A meaningful panoramic view of what it means to be human...Cause for celebration." --Times-PicayuneFrom the author of the National Book Critics Circle Award finalist Let the Dead Bury Their Dead comes a moving, clich&#233-shattering group portrait of African Americans at the turn of the twenty-first century.In a hypnotic blend of oral history and travel writing, Randall Kenan sets out to answer a question that has has long fascinated him: What does it mean to be black in America today? To find the answers, Kenan traveled America--from Alaska to Louisiana, from Maine to Las Vegas--over the course of six years, interviewing nearly two hundred African Americans from every conceivable walk of life. We meet a Republican congressman and an AIDS activist; a Baptist minister in Mormon Utah and an ambitious public-relations major in North Dakota; militant activists in Atlanta and movie folks in Los Angeles. The result is a marvellously sharp, full picture of contemporary African American lives and experiences.
Amarin
Haven't finished reading yet but am enjoying it. I saw Kenan interviewed and was very impressed. He's done his homework, knows his terrain.
Bloodhammer
I thought that Randall Kenan's book was very good, and thought provoking. The best things I liked about it was the fact that he tackled this very broad subject matter, but did not go into the book with any preconceived notions about the authenticity or meaning of "blackness." There was no sense that he was trying to label the people he was interviewing, or make any kind of judgments about them of how more or less "black cultured" they were. I think it is a tremendous credit to the author that despite the emotional tenderness of delving into one's personal heritage, through it all he was always able to come across as kind, considerate, unbiased, and at many times sympathetic to their particular point of view. The time consuming years in which it seemed to take for him to make this book, and his perserverence in remaining patient and sensitive is amazing. The other thing that deserves much appreciation is the fact that he just didn't go to where the obvious most dense congregation of black people were, nor did he just remain in the south to answer his question of "blackness." The whole idea that he interviewed black people in very obscure places: Maine, western Canada, Wyoming, etc. was a pleasant refreshing surprise that added depth, openess, and wonder with each succeeding chapter. I think this was the true gem of the whole book, and set it apart from others like it.
Despite the fact that I liked the book very much there were a couple of things I felt inhibited the flow. For instance, I felt a few of the interviews were too long, and the interviewees were allowed to go too far away from the main subject. Although I liked the injection of history in each chapter, which gave you a sense of how black people got to that place historically, some of the chapters felt bogged down with too much history, and not enough present day feelings, the Allensworth, California chapter was the best example of that. I also thought that there should have been a better distinction between the author's thoughts and what the interviewees were actually saying. Too many times that line was blurred, and got a little confusing.
Despite all this though I would still highly recommend the book. My few criticisms in the previous paragraph are the only things that kept me from giving it a full 5 star rating.
Iaiastta
If anyone ever doubted that African Americans live diverse lives this book will prove otherwise. In his travels, Mr. Keenan interviewed blacks from various backgrounds. It was definitely an eye opener for myself at the great diversity. The region of birth and circumstances of environment determine how these blacks viewed themselves and their place in society. I found the chaper on blacks in Vermont and Louisiana as two examples of what the world does not see as exposed by the media. Yes, there were a few mistakes, but the people who nitpicked at this let these mistakes overshadow the purpose and revelations of this find memoir. This is a book that should be kept in all Americans libraries and in particulary African Americans. I commend the author on all the hard work and time he put into it.
bass
I just learned about Randall Kenan two weeks ago, when Time Magazine did a series about the Mississippi River. I decided to try his books, when he was described as the African American answer to William Faulkner. My only criticism. Too long! Otherwise, for someone who isn't African American it was a learning experience. You get to see profiles of African Americans in all walks of life.
ChallengeMine
The author takes us to different parts of the country to interview african americans, of every aspect of life, getting their opinion on the state of the race. I learned a lot by reading this book, like Mary Ellen Pleasant and her roled with John Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry. Very informative book, about black life past, and present.
ARE
Henry O. Tanner's painting is "Banjo Lesson," not "Guitar" (page 506). The newspaper is Atlanta Daily World, not Daily News (550); and Lorrie's story has too many "reallys" in it (562). The author could have deleted a few. Again, good book except for the mistakes and the overload of adverbs.