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eBook Waterlily download
Politics
Author: Raymond J. DeMallie,Ella Cara Deloria
ISBN: 0803247397
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Pages 244 pages
Publisher University of Nebraska Press; 1st edition (February 1, 1988)
Language English
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 885
ePUB size: 1266 kb
FB2 size: 1894 kb
DJVU size: 1422 kb
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eBook Waterlily download

by Raymond J. DeMallie,Ella Cara Deloria


Ella Cara Deloria (Author), Raymond J. DeMallie (Afterword). Deloria was a Sioux Indian and an ethnologist who worked with anthropologist Franz Boas.

Ella Cara Deloria (Author), Raymond J. Written in the early 1940s and now published for the first time, this culturally detailed novel of 19th century Sioux life focuses on a young girl named Waterlily. When her mother Blue Bird is deserted by her husband, she and her daughter are welcomed by relatives at their tiyospaye (encampment of related households) on the western plains. A member of a prominent Yankton Sioux family, Ella Cara Deloria was born in 1889 on the Yankton Reservation and lived as a child on the Standing Rock Reservation

Ella Cara Deloria (Author), Raymond J. A member of a prominent Yankton Sioux family, Ella Cara Deloria was born in 1889 on the Yankton Reservation and lived as a child on the Standing Rock Reservation. Her studies at Columbia University with Franz Boas resulted in three books, Dakota Texts, Dakota Grammar (a collaboration with Boas), and Speaking of Indians, as well as many other writings.

Ella Cara Deloria (January 31, 1889 – February 12, 1971), (Yankton Dakota), also called Aŋpétu Wašté Wiŋ (Beautiful Day Woman), was an educator, anthropologist, ethnographer, linguist.

Ella Cara Deloria (January 31, 1889 – February 12, 1971), (Yankton Dakota), also called Aŋpétu Wašté Wiŋ (Beautiful Day Woman), was an educator, anthropologist, ethnographer, linguist, and novelist of European American and Native American (American Indian) ancestry. In the 1940s, Deloria wrote a novel titled Waterlily, which was published in 1988, and republished in 2009.

Ella Cara Deloria?s tale follows Blue Bird and her daughter, Waterlily, through the intricate kinship practices that created unity among her people

Ella Cara Deloria?s tale follows Blue Bird and her daughter, Waterlily, through the intricate kinship practices that created unity among her people. Waterlily, published after Deloria?s death and generally viewed as the masterpiece of her career, offers a captivating glimpse into the daily life of the nineteenth-century Sioux.

Ella Cara Deloria (January 31, 1889 – February 12, 1971), (Yankton Dakota), also called Aŋpétu Wašté Wiŋ (Beautiful Day Woman), was an educator, anthropologist, ethnographer, linguist, and novelist of European American and Dakota ancestry. In the 1940s, she wrote a novel, Waterlily. Ella Cara Deloria’s books.

by Ella Cara Deloria, Raymond J. DeMallie.

Ella Cara Deloria, Raymond J. Demallie, Susan Gardner. When Blue Bird and her grandmother leave their family's camp to gather beans for the long, threatening winter, they inadvertently avoid the horrible fate that befalls the rest of the family. Luckily, the two women are adopted by a nearby Dakota community and are eventually integrated into their kinship circles. Ella Cara Deloria's tale follows Blue Bird and her daughter, Waterlily, through the intricate kinship practices that created unity among her people.

Raymond J. Ella Cara Deloria (Author). This novel of the Dakota Sioux written by Sioux ethnologist Deloria takes protagonist Waterlily through the everyday and the extraordinary events of a Sioux woman's life.

This novel of the Dakota Sioux written by Sioux ethnologist Deloria takes protagonist Waterlily through the everyday and the extraordinary events of a Sioux woman's life.

For the book was written by Ella Deloria, herselfa Sioux and an accomplished ethnologist, who sought to record and preserve traditional Sioux ways through this imaginative recreation of life in the camp circle

For the book was written by Ella Deloria, herselfa Sioux and an accomplished ethnologist, who sought to record and preserve traditional Sioux ways through this imaginative recreation of life in the camp circle. It is of special value because it is told from a woman's perspective-one that is much less well known than the warrior's or the holy man's. More fully and compellingly than any ethnological report, and with equal authority, it reveals the intricate system of relatedness, obligation, and respect that governed the world of all Dakotas as it takes the.

Traces the life of Waterlily, a Sioux woman, from her birth to the birth of her own child, and shares her view of tribal culture
Siralune
This was an eye opening read. I have long been a defender our Native Americans and this book only reinforced my beliefs. I am sure most Americans have no idea how civilized the Native Americans actually were since our history books have unjustly vilified them as savages with the purpose of justifying the atrocities that were committed against them so that we could rob them of their land. Keep in mind that there are good and bad people in all races! This is a must read if you are at all interested in opening your mind to the truth of just how civilized our Native Americans really were. It was also a pleasant and easy read.
Kadar
Awesome book, I had to read this for my South Dakota American Indian studies class and it was a very easy read that my professor loved to pull from.
Dorilune
Wonderful History from a woman's point of view of pre-western expansion Lakota life.
Welahza
I liked this book partly because it was the one fiction book among nonfiction texts assigned in my anthropology class, and because the story itself was engaging. It also introduced me to a culture that I wasn't familiar with: Native American tribes.
Arakus
It is always a joy to read books by the Delorias' . I found this book to be very moving. I enjoy reading books 'pre-contact. I have purchased several copies for gifts and all have enjoyed it!
riki
I enjoyed this book much more than I thought I would. There is a lot of information about the traditional Dakota kinship ways, spiritual ways, etc. At the same time the characters and story line entertain. I definitely recommend this book for anyone interested in learning about American Indian traditions in a fictional novel.
HelloBoB:D
More than pleased.
Great read!! Even if you are not interested in the life of a Lakota womyn, it's written well and painted a very vivid story.