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eBook The Spy Who Tried to Stop a War: Katharine Gun and the Secret Plot to Sanction the Iraq Invasion download
Politics
Author: Thomas Mitchell,Marcia Mitchell
ISBN: 0981576915
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Pages 210 pages
Publisher Polipoint Press (August 1, 2008)
Language English
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 149
ePUB size: 1681 kb
FB2 size: 1978 kb
DJVU size: 1991 kb
Other formats: doc docx lrf azw

eBook The Spy Who Tried to Stop a War: Katharine Gun and the Secret Plot to Sanction the Iraq Invasion download

by Thomas Mitchell,Marcia Mitchell


British secret service officer Katharine Gun's only.

British secret service officer Katharine Gun's only.

I bought the book to learn about Katherine Gun's activity and the establishment's response. It could have been a great article in a heavyweight magazine. One person found this helpful.

Marcia Mitchell, Thomas Mitchell. Publisher: Polipoint Press. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Savage Appetites: Four True Stories of Women, Crime, and Obsession.

In the weeks leading up to the war in Iraq, Katharine Gun exposed a US plot to spy on. .

In the weeks leading up to the war in Iraq, Katharine Gun exposed a US plot to spy on the UN in leaks published in the Observer. She joins former Observer journalist Martin Bright to tell their story ahead of a forthcoming Hollywood adaptation. In the weeks before the invasion, Tony Blair and George W Bush continued to make the case for war in Iraq despite the lack of evidence that Saddam Hussein had stockpiles of weapons of mass destruction.

Chicago Tribune" A thoughtful and sympathetic new biography. Ruth Franklin, "The Atlantic" "" Excellent. The Wall Street Journal"".

British secret service officer Katharine Gun's only crime was telling the truth, but she paid a steep price when she exposed a .

Just for a moment, some imagined that this might be enough to stop the Iraq war before it had begun. It wasn’t, of course, but hindsight and history may end up judging Gun’s decisions more kindly than Bush’s or Blair’s.

book, The Spy Who Tried To Stop A War: Katherine Gun and The Secret Plot to Sanction the Iraq Invasion.

It was announced today that Ford would be joining director Justin Chadwick’s Official Secrets, the much more succinctly titled adaptation of Marcia and Thomas Mitchell’s best-selling book, The Spy Who Tried To Stop A War: Katherine Gun and The Secret Plot to Sanction the Iraq Invasion. Here’s the official synopsis and casting breakdown: In the run up to the 2003 invasion of Iraq, Katharine Gun (Dormer), a young British intelligence officer reveals a secret illegal NSA spy operation against the UN Security Council designed to ensure passage of a resolution for war to Martin Bright (Bettany) a reporter at the British newspaper, The London Observer.

The 2003 Iraq Invasion was a preventable war. An unnecessary crime against humanity.

Gregory Bernstein (screenplay), Sara Bernstein (screenplay), Gavin Hood (screenplay), Marcia Mitchell (based on the book "The Spy Who Tried to Stop a War: Katharine Gun and the Secret Plot to Sanction the Iraq Invasion"), Thomas Mitchell (based on the book "The Spy Who Tried to Stop a War: Katharine Gun and the Secret Plot t. The 2003 Iraq Invasion was a preventable war. Hood's docudrama prompts us to relive the political agendas of socialist manipulation, by recounting GCHQ employee Katharine Gun's life, but more specifically her intent on preventing a war.

British secret service officer Katharine Gun's only crime was telling the truth, but she paid a steep price when she exposed a U.S.-U.K. spy operation to secure UN authorization for the Iraq invasion. Thoroughly researched and engagingly written, this book tells the story of the young woman Sean Penn describes as "a hero of the human spirit."
Sagda
I agree with the headline and opening paragraph of PenName's review. I have great respect for Katherine Gun and what she did, but the serious content of this book is thin and is padded out with irrelevant personal stuff. I bought the book to learn about Katherine Gun's activity and the establishment's response. It could have been a great article in a heavyweight magazine. I, too, am baffled as to why the email at the centre of the story is not actually reproduced in the book. That is far more relevant than the fact that Ms Gun shared details of her early sex life with her mother.
Jake
I found this book to be very well written. This type of true story can be dry and boring, but the authors have very cleverly unfolded the story in an interesting and complex set of inter-related story lines which keep the reader engaged and turning pages.
Buzalas
We have recommended this book to a number of friends and are told that they could not put it down. Excellent. She did what her conscious told her to do when she discovered something very wrong. We need more people like her in the world …
Drelalen
When was the last time you couldn't wait to get back to your favorite book? Well, it had been a long time for me. This true story reads like a James Bond novel in some places. A compelling and often unsettling look at how American politics and policies can work or just as easily go awry. It is an exciting story.
Tantil
It appeared that the authors lost their objectivity when writing about Katherine Gunn.
Kazigrel
Excellent and intriguing a must read.
Malak
... those in Congress and the Executive office, anyway, needed to be stopped! I'm glad that Katharine had the guts to say, "Wait a minute ... that's a bald-faced lie." As those were the very same words I was uttering during the whole lead-up to the invasion, although I didn't have the proof sitting in my hands. If I knew then (or knew that I knew) what I know now about the stupidity of the whole fiasco, I would have done the same thing! Although the book, as Pen Name states, is basically built on the sensationalism of the British press, if you are any kind of writer, you know that there are very fine lines that can be crossed without being put on the block yourself. The authors did a fantastic job of pointing out just how creepy government can be (British or American) when the attack is on them.
Even though this book is being published five years after GCHQ Chinese linguist Katherine Gun leaked an American government memorandum calling for a joint British-American "surge" in electronic espionage directed against some countries who were sitting on the United Nations Security Council, there is precious little new in this book. One could get most of the gist of this book merely by reading back issues of British newspapers. This book really should have been just a long magazine article. What's more, the full, leaked memorandum itself is not even included in the book. (If you want to read the original memo you can find it at: [...]).

It is only in the second half of the book that we find out much about Katherine Gun's rather unique background. While Mrs. Gun publicly claims that if she had to do it all over again she would still leak the memo - and is hailed by many for her stance - I believe that she really would not do so, especially knowing now how much pressure she and here husband would be under. Mr. Gun (I expect his name is pronounced "goon") is an ethnic Turk who married Mrs. Gun only a few months before her getting caught up in a violation of the Official Secrets Act. In what seems like retaliation for his wife's actions, he was arrested for violating his visa and came witin an inch of deportation.

Inflamed by moral outrage at what the US Government was proposing to the British, Mrs. Gun was obviously not aware that at the United Nations, itself, most UN representatives automatically assumed that they were spied upon. And despite her own job in Signals Intelligence, Mrs. Gun apparently believed - sometimes, at least - that "gentlemen do not read each other's mail." Now that really is naive.

Ultimately, Mrs. Gun is a very lucky young woman. If she had been in the old Russian intelligence service she would very likely have been executed for what she did. As it is, she risked years in British prison. In retrospect, her gesture seems to have been misguided, Quixotic, and rash, and ultimately had almost no effect on the British-American rush to war. It does not - and did not - take a rocket scientist to understand that the US and Britain were committed to attacking Iraq, UN Security Council resolution or not.

I also believe that Mrs. Gun is being used, not least by the people who are profiting from this book and from her appearances on the lecture circuit. I wish Mrs. Gun all the best, but I think she should return to life as a teacher, linguist, and mother, and not be drawn in by all the hype about what a heroine she was. In all honesty, I believe it's time for this young wife and mother to thank her lucky stars and stand back from the fray.