» » Soviet Propaganda Network: A Directory of Organizations Serving Soviet Foreign Policy
eBook Soviet Propaganda Network: A Directory of Organizations Serving Soviet Foreign Policy download
Politics
Author: Clive Rose
ISBN: 086187000X
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Pages 356 pages
Publisher Pinter Publrs. (February 1989)
Language English
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 839
ePUB size: 1409 kb
FB2 size: 1405 kb
DJVU size: 1222 kb
Other formats: rtf doc doc txt

eBook Soviet Propaganda Network: A Directory of Organizations Serving Soviet Foreign Policy download

by Clive Rose


Saved in: Main Author: Rose, Clive.

THIS book provides a list of Soviet organizations, Soviet-controlled fronts and 'Soviet-influenced organisations' which the author considers in one way or another to serve Soviet foreign policy

THIS book provides a list of Soviet organizations, Soviet-controlled fronts and 'Soviet-influenced organisations' which the author considers in one way or another to serve Soviet foreign policy. It includes a short discussion of Gorbachev's foreign policy and a longer history of the evolution of the network of front organizations.

The Soviet Propaganda Network book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

The Soviet Propaganda Network book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. The Soviet Propaganda.

The Soviet propaganda network. Published 1988 by Pinter Publishers, St. Martin's Press in London, New York. Directories, Disarmament, Foreign relations, International agencies, Peace, Societies, Soviet Propaganda.

Soviet foreign propaganda. Book · January 2015 with 24 Reads . While the Russian government's propaganda campaign has followed the classic effort to shape public opinion, culture, and perceived reality within the confines of a nation state ( Ellul 1973;Herf 2006;Barghoorn 1964;Kenez 1985;Pipes 1995), it has also, due to the Internet and to the deregulation of Western media ownership, been aggressively projected by Russia into the Western media. Diplomacy, as perhaps the most traditional instrument of foreign policy, can be defined as the interaction between the official representatives of two or more states for the purpose of maintaining or modifying their relations.

62. Erskine, quoted in F. Knight Hunt, The Fourth Estate: Contributions Towards a History of Newspapers and of the Liberty of the Press, vol . David Bogue, 86 Fleet Street, London, 1850, p. 26. oogle Scholar.

Communist propaganda in the Soviet Union was extensively based on the Marxist–Leninist ideology to promote the Communist Party line

Communist propaganda in the Soviet Union was extensively based on the Marxist–Leninist ideology to promote the Communist Party line. In the Stalin era, it penetrated even social and natural sciences giving rise to various pseudo-scientific theories such as Lysenkoism, whereas fields of real knowledge, as genetics, cybernetics and comparative linguistics were condemned and forbidden as "bourgeois pseudoscience". Propaganda was one of the many ways the Soviet Union tried to control its citizens.

Overall, this outstanding book deserves a wide audience among Soviet historians and cultural historians of the Cold Wa.

sential aspect of Soviet foreign policy. ment of Soviet foreign policy was VOKS. From the beginning, this

sential aspect of Soviet foreign policy. Apart from its characterization as manipulative propaganda, So-. viet cultural diplomacy was best known for its excellent protagonists. This di-. verse network of cultural organizations, which was initially intended. to make up for the lack of normal diplomatic relations, gradually be-. came one of the most effective instruments in the history of Soviet. From the beginning, this. cultural network intrigued anti-communist organizations and person