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eBook Classified: Secrecy and the State in Modern Britain download
Politics
Author: Christopher Moran
ISBN: 1107000998
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Pages 449 pages
Publisher Cambridge University Press (January 28, 2013)
Language English
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 135
ePUB size: 1899 kb
FB2 size: 1298 kb
DJVU size: 1483 kb
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eBook Classified: Secrecy and the State in Modern Britain download

by Christopher Moran


Government secrecy – which this book is about – blanketed vast areas of British public life for most of the last .

Government secrecy – which this book is about – blanketed vast areas of British public life for most of the last century, upheld by a fierce and undiscriminating Official Secrets Act, passed through parliament by underhand means in 1911 (the government of the day pretended it was just to stop German spies), and by the gentlemanly code of those in the know. Thus armed, a supposedly democratic state could – the argument went – keep us safe from foreign plots, and also – though this was less trumpeted – from domestic subversion: for example, through strikes.

In his highly readable book, Classified, Dr Moran does the truth great service by exploring with fair objectivity the .

In his highly readable book, Classified, Dr Moran does the truth great service by exploring with fair objectivity the difficult middle ground in a revealing series of milestone case studies. Wherever one chooses to stand on this thorny, arcane, contentious and fascinating issue, Moran's book will certainly leave its readers far better informed. Dr Moran puts into clear perspective how those views of secrecy have evolved through the years including use of the D Notice, a measure often viewed with envy by bureaucrats in Washington. A valuable contribution to the study of government secrecy, Dr Moran's work will enhance the reader's grasp of the fundamental issues raised.

The Modern State and Administrative Secrecy : A Case Study of India. October 1979 · The Indian journal of public administration: quarterly journal of the Indian Institute of Public Administration. A Comparative View: Administrative Secrecy in Britain. Secrecy and the State in Modern Britain. By Christopher Moran. May 2013 · Twentieth Century British History.

Classified: Secrecy and the state in modern Britain. Cambridge University Press, 2012. An INS Special Forum: Implications of the Snowden Leaks. Intelligence Studies in Britain and the US: Historiography since 1945: Historiography since 1945. Edinburgh University Press, 2013. CR Moran, SD Willmetts. International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence 24 (2), 239-252, 2011. Spooked: Britain, empire and intelligence since 1945.

Christopher Moran is an associate professor of . national security at the University of Warwick in England. He is the award-winning author of Classified: Secrecy and the State in Modern Britain and has held fellowships at the British Academy, the Library of Congress, and Oxford University. ನ್ನಷ್ಟು ಓದಿ. ಕುಗ್ಗಿಸಿ.

Christopher Moran is a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Politics and International Studies at the University of Warwick. Country of Publication. Politics & Government.

Classified, by the academic Christopher Moran, follows the maxim that history should not only educate but amuse.

Classified: Secrecy and the State in Modern Britain (Hardback). In his highly readable book, Classified, Dr Moran does the truth great service by exploring with fair objectivity the difficult middle ground in a revealing series of milestone case studies. Christopher Moran (author).

Classified is a fascinating account of the British state's long obsession with secrecy and the ways it sought to prevent information about its secret activities from entering the public domain. Drawing on recently declassified documents, unpublished correspondence and exclusive interviews with key officials and journalists, Christopher Moran pays particular attention to the ways that the press and memoirs have been managed by politicians and spies. He argues that, by the 1960s, governments had become so concerned with their inability to keep secrets that they increasingly sought to offset damaging leaks with their own micro-managed publications. The book reveals new insights into seminal episodes in British post-war history, including the Suez crisis, the D-Notice Affair and the treachery of the Cambridge spies, identifying a new era of offensive information management, and putting the contemporary battle between secret-keepers, electronic media and digital whistle-blowers into long-term perspective.