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eBook Battling the Elements: Weather and Terrain in the Conduct of War download
Politics
Author: Harold A. Winters
ISBN: 0801866480
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Pages 334 pages
Publisher JHUP; New Ed edition (March 21, 2001)
Language English
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 521
ePUB size: 1497 kb
FB2 size: 1765 kb
DJVU size: 1733 kb
Other formats: doc mbr txt mobi

eBook Battling the Elements: Weather and Terrain in the Conduct of War download

by Harold A. Winters


Published in cooperation with the Center for American Places, Harrisonburg, Virginia"-P. Includes bibliographical references (p. -306) and index.

Published in cooperation with the Center for American Places, Harrisonburg, Virginia"-P. Throughout history, from Hannibal's crossing of the Alps to Rommel's desert warfare, military operations have succeeded or failed on the ability of commanders to incorporate environmental conditions into their tactics. In Battling the Elements, geographer Harold A. Winters and former .

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Harold A. Winters book, Battling the Elements, is detailed and interesting. You'll learn a lot, and enjoy the colorful information. This book examines how weather and terrain have affected warfare, from the Napoleonic Wars to the Vietnam War. This book takes a look at military history from a different perspective that can be loosely equated to Clausewitz's notion of "friction" in warfare. Each of the 12 chapters provides a look at how weather, terrain, or both have affected a variety of military campaigns and battles. This book probably will not satisfy readers interested in traditional military history.

In Battling the Elements, geographer Harold A. Harold A. Winters is a professor emeritus of geography at Michigan State University

In Battling the Elements, geographer Harold A. Army officers Gerald E. Galloway J. William J. Reynolds, and David W. Rhyne, examine the connections between major battles in world history and their geographic components, revealing what role factors such as weather, climate, terrain, soil, and vegetation have played in combat. Winters is a professor emeritus of geography at Michigan State University. Gerald E. who retired as a brigadier general after serving thirty-nine years in the . army, is secretary for the . Section of the International Joint Committee.

A remarkable guide to nature's effects on the conduct of military operations. Even in the age of precision-guided weapons and amazingly powerful sensors, the elements get in the way: most recently, NATO pilots attacking Serb targets last spring found that bad weather thwarted their effort for days at a time

In Battling the Elements, geographer Harold A. Each chapter offers a detailed and engaging explanation of a specific environmental factor and then looks at several battles that highlight its effects on military operations.  . One lesson this book teaches is that bad weather usually favors defenders: the Germans used fog and precipitation to their advantage during the Battle of the Bulge, as did the Viet Cong during the siege of Khe Sanh. Reylds, and David W. ISBN13: 9780801866487.

Battling the Elements: Weather and Terrain in the Conduct of Wa. This book fills an important gap in the literature.

Battling the Elements: Weather and Terrain in the Conduct of War. Article. FOREIGN AFF. Eliot A. Cohen. I endorse it enthusiastically not only to those interested in an unusual aspect of science, but also to military commanders at all levels who wish to use weather as an ally, rather than to face it as a fo. -Lt. Gen. Thomas S. Moorman, USAF (Re. America's military weather forecasters have played a crucial role in the success or failure of military operations, such as the Normandy invasion of World War II and the aborted Iranian hostage rescue mission of April, 1980.

Throughout history, from Kublai Khan's attempted invasions of Japan to Rommel's desert warfare, military operations have succeeded or failed on the ability of commanders to incorporate environmental conditions into their tactics. In Battling the Elements, geographer Harold A. Winters and former U.S. Army officers Gerald E. Galloway Jr., William J. Reynolds, and David W. Rhyne, examine the connections between major battles in world history and their geographic components, revealing what role factors such as weather, climate, terrain, soil, and vegetation have played in combat. Each chapter offers a detailed and engaging explanation of a specific environmental factor and then looks at several battles that highlight its effects on military operations. As this cogent analysis of geography and war makes clear, those who know more about the shape, nature, and variability of battleground conditions will always have a better understanding of the nature of combat and at least one significant advantage over a less knowledgeable enemy.

Painwind
This could have been a VERY boring book but the author's treatment of global weather patterns (and the seasonal variance found in different regions) was handled very well, especially when he juxtaposed said patterns against military strategies which either beneficially utilized, or ran afoul of, those same weather patterns.

This was an extremely interesting and informative book, and well worth the purchase.
Hono
Awesome book about geography and warfare.
Not-the-Same
This book was much more in depth than I had expected and I actually learned new things. The difference is that this book explains military decisions from a weather/geography/geology perspective that is extremely interesting and insightful.
Arar
Interesting set of vignettes on how the terrain and the weather have impeded the best-laid plans of generals and nations
Stonewing
Harold A. Winters book, Battling the Elements, is detailed and interesting. You'll learn a lot, and enjoy the colorful information.
SiIеnt
Very good book, easy to read, engaging, well worth it. Suitable for professional audiences or interested parties, no dramas whatsoever.
Ice_One_Guys
new prospective on important battles.
This book examines how weather and terrain have affected warfare, from the Napoleonic Wars to the Vietnam War. This book takes a look at military history from a different perspective that can be loosely equated to Clausewitz's notion of "friction" in warfare. Each of the 12 chapters provides a look at how weather, terrain, or both have affected a variety of military campaigns and battles.

This book probably will not satisfy readers interested in traditional military history. But, this book is worth reading for persons interested in looking at military history from a different perspective, or persons interested in understanding how external factors such as weather and terrain can seriously affect the planning and execution of military strategies and tactics. The cross-disciplinary approach taken by the authors is a welcome change of pace, with an analysis that is different from the usual approaches taken in many books about military history.

There is one flaw in the book worth noting. Overall, the writers generally strike a reasonable balance in providing sufficient technical background information about weather and terrain to be able to understand and appreciate the significant effects they can have on military operations. But, the writers occasionally provide unnecessary and excessive technical discussions of weather and terrain that detract from the military history narrative. For example, Chapter 6 makes some very interesting observations about how terrain significantly affected military operations in the Eastern United States during the American Civil War, but risks losing many readers with a discussion about how the geology of the Eastern United States was formed and transformed over a period of approximately 250 million years. Similarly, Chapter 8 provides an informative look at how terrain was a critical factor in Alpine warfare during World War I, and the invasions of Russia by Charles XII of Sweden, Napoleon Bonaparte, and Adolf Hitler, but spends too long discussing how the geology of the Alps and Russia were formed and transformed by glaciers approximately two million years ago.

The interdisciplinary approach of this book could be challenging for some readers, but it worth the effort if you want to get a different perspective on military history.