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eBook In darkest England, and the way out (The Social history of poverty: the urban experience) download
Politics
Author: William Booth
ISBN: 0512007527
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Publisher Garrett Press (1970)
Language English
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 857
ePUB size: 1623 kb
FB2 size: 1262 kb
DJVU size: 1699 kb
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eBook In darkest England, and the way out (The Social history of poverty: the urban experience) download

by William Booth


This article discusses the Lights in Darkest England (LIDE) match campaign, rolled out by General William Booth .

This article discusses the Lights in Darkest England (LIDE) match campaign, rolled out by General William Booth, founder of the Salvation Army in London’s East End 1891-1901. The purpose is to draw comparison between this campaign and the definition and principles of social marketing as they are understood today. A case study approach is used. First the Victorian match industry is described and then the Lights in Darkest England campaign is compared with the elements considered integral to an effective social marketing approach.

In 1890 AD, William Booth, church minister and founder of the Salvation Army, was influenced by Heinroth's 1818 AD book and adopted the view that men who chose to sin can slide down a slippery slope into involuntary.

In 1890 AD, William Booth, church minister and founder of the Salvation Army, was influenced by Heinroth's 1818 AD book and adopted the view that men who chose to sin can slide down a slippery slope into involuntary insanity.

William Booth from In Darkest England and the Way Out (1890) William Booth (1829–1919) was a religious and social reformer who founded the Salvation Army. Booth hoped to solve the problem of urban poverty by developing work colonies in Great Britain and abroad. Part I. - The Darkness. And just as Mr. Stanley's Zanzibaris lost faith, and could only be induced to plod on in brooding sullenness of dull despair, so the most of our social reformers, no matter how cheerily they may have started off, with forty pioneers swinging blithely their axes as they force their way into the wood, soon become depressed and despairing.

Stories include women rescued from neglect; older men experiencing . At the start, he sets out the problems in society in the UK, comparing it to th. .

Stories include women rescued from neglect; older men experiencing employer ageism in spite of their skills; missing persons found thanks to communication between branches of the charity; and lives dramatically turned around. Although William Booth put his prominent name to the publication, it is agreed that most of this book was written by the passionate investigative journalist W. T. Stead. At the start, he sets out the problems in society in the UK, comparing it to the darkness of Africa. He considers the jobless, the women and girls with no options but prostitution, alcoholics (etc).

Subjects: Social and Population History, British History after 1450, History Reworking the cliché of 'Darkest Africa', in the first part he describes the 'submerged tenth' of Darkest England - destitute and/or.

Subjects: Social and Population History, British History after 1450, History. Series: Cambridge Library Collection - British and Irish History, 19th Century. Recommend to librarian. This classic work in the literature of poverty was published in 1890 by William Booth (1829–1912), the founder of the Salvation Army.

An analysis of the causes of poverty in England, with some proposed solutions, from the founder of the Salvation Army. The title is a deliberate reference to Stanley's "In darkest Africa," which was published the same year.

Start by marking In Darkest England and the Way Out (Patterson Smith series in criminology, law enforcement, and . A work years ahead of its time, looking at the social issues in Victorian England and presenting pioneering ways of solving them from a Christian perspective.

Start by marking In Darkest England and the Way Out (Patterson Smith series in criminology, law enforcement, and social problems, publication 142) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Home Browse Books Book details, In Darkest England: And the Way Ou.

Home Browse Books Book details, In Darkest England: And the Way Out. In Darkest England: And the Way Out. By General William Booth. When but a mere child the degradation and helpless misery of the poor Stockingers of my native town, wandering gaunt and hunger-stricken through the streets droning out their melancholy ditties, crowding the Union or toiling like galley slaves on relief works for a bare subsistence, kindled in my heart yearnings to help the poor which have continued to this day and which.

Tolrajas
William Booth (1829-1912) is the founder of the Salvation Army. He worked as a Methodist lay-preacher in the poverty strikken East End of Londen in the mid-1800's before he founded the Salvation Army in 1865.

In this book he explains his views on how a Christian should live and act. Booth believed that people should be helped and not judged. The Salvation Army is still very active in the distribution of humanitarian aid in many countries of the world. In this memoir-like book Booth also writes a lot about the poverty and destitution he saw in the slums of London. He includes some of the stories of people he met to help him explain his points of view on poverty and humanitarian help. He is not only touched by the difficulties of the poor, he also believes that to save the soul of a man you need to seek the salvation of the body ("...I must assert in the most unqualified way that it is primarily and mainly for
the sake of saving the soul that I seek the salvation of the body." [Copied from Chapter 5]).

The first edition of this book was printed in 1890.

I recommend this book to anyone who is interested in William Booth and the Salvation Army, or in social history of the UK in the 19th century.

To give you an idea of the book I will copy two subsections of Chapter 3:

[...]
Some seven years ago a great outcry was made concerning the Housing of
the Poor. Much was said, and rightly said--it could not be said too
strongly--concerning the disease-breeding, manhood-destroying
character of many of the tenements in which the poor herd in our large
cities. But there is a depth below that of the dweller in the slums.
It is that of the dweller in the street, who has not even a lair in the
slums which he can call his own. The houseless Out-of-Work is in one
respect at least like Him of whom it was said, "Foxes have holes, and
birds of the air have nests, but the Son of Man hath not where to lay
His head."
[...]
(About one of the homeless people Booth met on the street he notes:)
No. 8. Slept here four nights running. Is a builder's labourer by
trade, that is, a handy-man. Had a settled job for a few weeks which
expired three weeks since. Has earned nothing for nine days. Then
helped wash down a shop front and got 2s. 6d. for it. Does anything
he can get. Is 46 years old. Earns about 2d. or 3d. a day at horse
minding. A cup of tea and a bit of bread yesterday, and same to-day,
is all he has had.
Akirg
Just having finished experiencing the great London Olympic games in 2012, it is hard to believe that just over a century ago, London was a totally different place. What happened? "In Darkest England and the Way Out," is an awful yet fascinating book (or rather a strategic, audacious plan) by one man and a vision to change a nation of 3 million destitute who were enslaved in the 1890's in darkest England. One tenth of the population at that time. This book grapples with what to do - how to respond to the needs of this "submerged tenth" of the population. One page 24, "Darkest England may be described as consisting broadly of three circles, one within the other. The outer and widest circle is inhabited by the starving and the homeless, but honest Poor. The second by those who live by Vice; and the third and innermost region at the centre is peopled by those who exist by Crime. The whole of the three circles is sodden with Drink. "

But this is a book about real people struggling to survive but have come upon even more hard times. Homeless, living on the streets, nowhere to go. The Embankment on the Thames is full of people who have been looking for work during the day, most unsuccessful. This is a picture of a dozen men interviewed at midnight by a Salvation Army officer, No. 4 is an elderly man and visibly starts to shake at the mention of work; "he produces a card carefully wrapped in old newspaper, to the effect that Mr. J.R. is a member of the Trade Protection League. He is a waterside laborer. last job a fortnight ago. has earned nothing for 5 days. Had a bit of bread this morning but not a scrap since. Had a cup of tea and two slices of bread yesterday. Is 50 years old and still damp from sleeping out in the wet last night." People wanting to work but there is none to be found.

This first half of the book goes through each of those circles mentioned above and ends up with the question, "Is there no help?" Part two of the book looks at , "What does deliverance look like? and essentials to success "

These essentials on pages 85-87 are the principals that the Salvation operated by then and are still valid for today.

1. The first essential that must be borne in mind as governing every Scheme ( or plan/project) that may be put forward is that it must change the man when it is in his character and conduct which constitute the reasons for his failure in the battle of life.

2. The remedy, to be effectual, must change the circumstances of the individual when they are the cause of his wretched condition, and lie beyond his control.

3. Any remedy worthy of consideration must be on a scale commensurate with the evil which it proposes to deal.

4. Not only must the Scheme (Plan or Project) be large enough, but it must be permanent.

5. But while it must be permanent, it must be immediately practical.

6. The indirect features of the Scheme must not be such as to produce injury to the person we seek to benefit.

7. While assisting one class of the community, it must not seriously interfere with the interests of another.

This strategic plan affected all of England and makes shows us why the Salvation Army today is one of the most impacting organizations on the planet.
Grotilar
Absolutely Love this item, makes me feel so free. Wish more men would embrace. This is a GREAT product. Love the full zipper.
Bedy
If you work for the Salvation Army or if you put a bit of money in its red kettles, you will enjoy reading more about the founding of a Church that has done so much good for so many needy people. And it is free to download. What's not to love?
Loni
Cities draw people with the promise of work and a better life in 1890. The ghettos of today's cities are also dark and dreadful places for the underclass.
He sees a social solution based on personal, individual transformation and by providing honorable work, skills, sanctuary and a way out to all of the workless and the hopeless. William Booth's hope of widespread social revolution have been replaced by the failing social solutions imposed by governments and false messiahs all around the world.
Arihelm
Eye opening book! Must read! Let’s solve homelessness and poverty!
Tejora
A very interesting book. William Booth had such great ideas and love for the lower class of people, especially the poor of England. You can see the love that he had for people and the hardships that he and his family, along with the ones that followed him, had to suffer to bring help to the suffering. Thank goodness the good works of the Salvation Army are still going on today. I did find the book to get a bit slow as you got into it.
The book is interesting and valuable, but physically this edition is hard to read. Type is small and there are no chapter breaks; it's unappealing to the eye, but worth the effort.