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Politics
Author: Misha Glenny
ISBN: 0142422568
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Pages 800 pages
Publisher Penguin Books; Updated edition (September 25, 2012)
Language English
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 980
ePUB size: 1220 kb
FB2 size: 1261 kb
DJVU size: 1926 kb
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eBook The Balkans: Nationalism, War, and the Great Powers, 1804-2011 download

by Misha Glenny


Glenny's audacious theme is that the Balkans are not a freestanding powder keg, but a 'powder trail' laid by the great powers . Misha Glenny was born in 1958 and educated at Bristol Universty and Charles University in Prague.

Glenny's audacious theme is that the Balkans are not a freestanding powder keg, but a 'powder trail' laid by the great powers themselves. Dusko Doder, The New Republic. Misha Glenny is the wisest and most reflective of all the Western journalists who have covered this part of Europe in the past two decades. this was an enormously ambitious book to undertake, but it is the book which Europe and America need. Neal Ascherson, Observer (UK). His coverage of the fall of communism in 1989-1990 was widely acclaimed and led to the writing of his first book, The Rebirth of History.

The Balkans: Nationalism, War & the Great Powers 1804 - 1999. 0142422568 (ISBN13: 9780142422564). Enver Hoxha, Franz Ferdinand, Zog, King of Albania, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, Karađorđe Petrović.

Misha Glenny was born in 1958 and educated at Bristol Universty and Charles University in Prague. His coverage of the fall of communism in 1989-1990 was widely acclaimed and led to the writing of his first book, The Rebirth of History

Misha Glenny was born in 1958 and educated at Bristol Universty and Charles University in Prague. During the Yugoslav crisis of the early 1990s, he was the Central Europe correspondent for the BBC World Service. In 1993, he won a Sony Award for his coverage of Yugoslavia. Glenny's The Fall of Yugoslavia (1993) won the Overseas Press Club Award for Best Book on Foreign Affairs

Glenny also explores the often-catastrophic relationship between the Balkans and the Great Powers, raising some disturbing questions about Western intervention.

The narrative is studded with sharply observed portraits of kings, guerrillas, bandits, generals, and politicians. Glenny also explores the often-catastrophic relationship between the Balkans and the Great Powers, raising some disturbing questions about Western intervention.

In this celebrated, landmark history of the Balkans, Misha Glenny investigates the roots of the bloodshed, invasions and nationalist fervour that have come to define our understanding of the south-eastern edge of Europe. In doing so, he reveals that groups we think of as implacable enemies have, over the centuries, formed unlikely alliances, thereby disputing the idea that conflict in the Balkans is the ineluctable product of ancient grudges.

The Balkans 1804-1999: nationalism, war and the great powers. If you only read one book on the Balkans this is the one you should read. Glenny takes us through the rise of the Balkans following their separation from the Ottoman Empire through the present day break up of Yugoslavia. The fall of communism is well illustrated as is the struggle between Russia and Austria for mastery of the region.

Mobile version (beta). The Balkans: Nationalism, War, and the Great Powers, 1804-2012. Download (epub, . 1 Mb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Now updated to include the fall of Slobodan Milosevic, the capture of all indicted war criminals from the Yugoslav wars, and each state's quest for legitimacy in the European Union, The Balkans explores the often catastrophic relationship between the Balkans and the Great Powers, raising some disturbing questions about Western intervention.

A newly revised and updated edition of an award-winning BBC correspondent's magisterial history of the Balkan region


This unique and lively history of Balkan geopolitics since the early nineteenth century gives readers the essential historical background to more than one hundred years of events in this war-torn area. No other book covers the entire region, or offers such profound insights into the roots of Balkan violence, or explains so vividly the origins of modern Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia, Greece, Bulgaria, Romania, and Albania. Now updated to include the fall of Slobodan Milosevic, the capture of all indicted war criminals from the Yugoslav wars, and each state's quest for legitimacy in the European Union, The Balkans explores the often catastrophic relationship between the Balkans and the Great Powers, raising some disturbing questions about Western intervention.

Bil
I bought this book because I didn’t know very much about the Balkans. Mostly my knowledge consisted of news stories that come out during big stories, such as the destruction of Yugoslavia. I wanted to understand more of the back story to these news articles. In particular, I wanted to understand why Yugoslavia fell apart.

The book did cover 200 years in detail, so I can now recount what happened. But I still don’t understand why things occurred as they did. Maybe that is the hazard of reading about a territory by a journalist instead of a historian. Journalists don’t usually look at the big picture.

There were three particular areas in which I was dissatisfied.

1) The biggest problem with the book is he never explained why the people of the Balkans are so fractious and localized. Other large areas have come together as countries in Europe, such as France, England, Germany, and Italy. Those countries all had regional disputes, but the countries held together. I have some theories on possibilities:
a. Maybe the countryside was more rugged than other areas that resulted in successful countries, so the localities were more separate culturally than in other countries? Glenny did not discuss this possibility at all, so who knows?
b. Perhaps being part of an empire for so many years which had a different state religion than most of the Balkans, and who were actively discriminated against, made the residents more rebellious against any centralized authority? (I realized later that Croatia and Slovenia were never part of the Ottoman Empire, which weakens this idea. I did not realize this about Croatia and Slovenia from reading this book; did he even discuss it? I may have just missed it.)
c. Coming together as a country in the 20th Century might be the killing issue, after the other large countries were already consolidated. Also, the other countries might have been able to use more draconian methods in earlier centuries to hold the group together.
But Glenny didn’t discuss any of these issues. I wish he had.

2) Yugoslavia came together as a country right after WWI. I was looking forward to an explanation of how this happened, and what forces and rationales were laid out pro and con. But he had no discussion whatsoever. Suddenly there was Yugoslavia. Probably one of the most significant events in those 200 years, and he left it blank.

3) On the last page before the Epilogue (which was written for the second edition), he wrote “There is an unassailable case for political and economic restitution in the Balkans.” And yet after 662 pages of reading his narrative, I completely disagree. His case is far from compelling. My impression throughout the entire book was that most of the travails of the Balkans, once they got free of the Ottomans, was almost completely of their own doing. Yes, the big powers made decisions in their own interest and not in those of the Balkans. This is how history has played out everywhere and always. It isn’t as if the Balkans were treated as slaves by the large powers, as has been the case in some places and periods. And even Glenny agrees that during the destruction of Yugoslavia that the great powers acted idealistically, unlike in all the other periods. Thus the period when the Balkans saw the most pain and destruction, the great powers did their best to minimize that pain. Perhaps they weren’t very successful, but that seemed mostly because the Balkanites themselves were so determined to destroy themselves. I doubt that anyone could have done much better. The people of the Balkans have had many difficulties for the last 200 years, but my reading of this book tells me that this wasn’t the fault of outsiders.

I gave the book three stars because it provided a lot of important information. But not more stars because good interpretation was lacking.
Tiainar
This is a very thorough history of Balkan history. It's strength is that it covers the entire Balkan region and also discusses in great length the influence and interference of other European nations in the region. It's strength is also it's weakness in that, depending on what you are most interested in and what previous reading about the region you have done, you. Ought find yourself skipping over entire sections.
Skrimpak
The author simplifies a complex history of a complex region. The author has a smooth writing style that helps the flow of this history. On the downside, he has a pessimistic view of the future of the Balkans. There is a need for an insert section of actual photographs from the historic periods. There should be a pronunciation guide for the glossary.
Runemane
Excellent review of Balkan area history. Very complete and up-to-date. Obviously not much into details due to the wide covered area and the longperiod. However, it provides a very comprehensive picture of what happened since Ottoman Empire started to retreat from the area and how that has affected balkan countries until very recently. It provides a good picture of Serbian historical relationship with the neighbours and how the Western Countries' intervention has screwed it up even worse which explains what has happened recently in Croatia, Bosnia and Kosovo. There are many books that deals with Yugoslavia's desintegration but, if you want to understand the full picture, this is the book.
Mall
True to its title, it brings you up to speed on the events of the last 200 years for all the Balkan states. It lacks a little in depth (the recent Bosnian war is a fraction of a chapter), but this is to be expected for a book which is attempting such a broad effort.
Jerdodov
Great book as gift husband loves
Nnulam
it helped me to understand the country I was visiting.
Excellent book, well written, documented and intriguing. This is a must read for anyone who wants to know the true facts of the history of the Balkan nations during the 19th and 20th centuries.