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eBook Kennedy, Khrushchev, and the Berlin-Cuba Crisis, 1961-1964 download
Politics
Author: Paul H. Nitze,John C. Ausland
ISBN: 8200226352
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Pages 239 pages
Publisher Scandinavian University Press (1996)
Language English
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 811
ePUB size: 1614 kb
FB2 size: 1864 kb
DJVU size: 1870 kb
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eBook Kennedy, Khrushchev, and the Berlin-Cuba Crisis, 1961-1964 download

by Paul H. Nitze,John C. Ausland


The task force set an innovative organizational pattern for the handling of subsequent crises within the .

The task force set an innovative organizational pattern for the handling of subsequent crises within the . A valuable aspect of the book is the documentary annexation that edifies the most serious and formative crisis of the Cold War and the most sensitive aspects of Berlin contingency planning. Some of the documents have never been published before.

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Kennedy, Khrushchev, and the Berlin-Cuba Crisis, 1961-1964. Foreign relations, Cuban Missile Crisis, 1962, Berlin Wall, Berlin, Germany, 1961-1989, International status. John F. Kennedy (1917-1963), Nikita Sergeevich Khrushchev (1894-1971). United States, Soviet Union, Berlin (Germany).

73047 21. Personal Name: Ausland, John C. Publication, Distribution, et. Oslo ; Boston Personal Name: Khrushchev, Nikita Sergeevich, 1894-1971. Oslo ; Boston. Scandinavian University Press, (c)1996. Personal Name: Khrushchev, Nikita Sergeevich, 1894-1971.

XIV, Berlin Crisis, 1961–1962, Doc. 193, Telegram from the Department of State to the Mission at Berlin . Despite all his first-year setbacks: John C. Ausland, Kennedy, Khrushchev, and the Berlin-Cuba Crisis, 1961–1964. 193, Telegram from the Department of State to the Mission at Berlin, Washington, October 26, 1961, 8:11 . Clay had never been more convinced: Department of State, Central Files, 76. 221/10-2661: Telegram 835 (Clay to Rusk), October 26, 1961, 1 . Oslo: Scandinavian University Press, 1996, 43–45; FRUS, 1961–1963, vol. XV, Berlin Crisis, 1962–1963, Doc.

Kennedy, Khrushchev, and the Berlin-Cuba Crisis, 1961-1964 : The 1961-64 Wall.

Paul Nitze, From Hiroshima to Glasnost (New York: Grove, 1989), p. .Jack M. Schick, The Berlin Crisis of 1961 and US Military Strategy, Orbis, 8 (1964/65), p. 82. oogle Scholar. 20. 2. James N. Giglio, The Presidency of John F. Kennedy (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1991), p. 70;Google Scholar. Michael R. Beschloss, The Crisis Years: Kennedy and Khrushchev, 1960–1963 (New York: Edward Burlingame, 1991), p. 3. 6. in John F. Kennedy, The Strategy of Peace (New York: Harper and Row, 1960), p. 38;Google Scholar.

The Berlin Crisis started when the USSR launched an ultimatum demanding the withdrawal of all armed forces from Berlin, including the Western armed forces in West Berlin.

In June 1961, Nikita Khrushchev called Berlin "the most dangerous place on earth. This great book provides context to the many crises that arose here between East and West and the great tensions it generated. He knew what he was talking about. Much has been written about the Cuban Missile Crisis a year later. It does not paint a flattering portrait of the young, inexperienced, and macho-obscessed JFK. Fascinating story.

Berlin 1961: Kennedy, Khrushchev, and the most dangerous place on earth (2011). Powaski, Ronald E. "John F. Kennedy, the Hawks, the Doves, and the Cuban Missile Crisis, 1962. in American Presidential Statecraft (2017) pp. 11-65.

Ballard, Robert D. (2002). Berlin 1961: Kennedy, Khrushchev, and the most dangerous place on earth (2011). Krenn, Michael L. "Kennedy, Johnson, and the Nonaligned World. Rabe, Stephen G. The Most Dangerous Area in the World: John F. Kennedy Confronts Communist Revolution in Latin America (1999).

Anyone interested in the true story that lies behind great historical events will be fascinated by this account of the Berlin-Cuba crisis. It will enrich the knowledge of those who lived through it and be instructive to those for whom it is mere history.

During the period covered by this book, Ausland was a member and later Deputy Director of the Berlin Task Force, the interagency organization that coordinated U.S. policy regarding Berlin. As such, he had a first-hand opportunity to see how business was really conducted behind the scenes.

It was what may have been the most fragile and dangerous period of the Cold War. The confrontation was one of uneasily building tensions, which in fact, still have reverberations in Europe today. With his position as a participant and keen observer during the Berlin-Cuba crisis, he was provided with information about the Kennedy administration's policy-making process that may never turn up in documents.

Most books about these turbulent days stop with the division of Berlin and the immediately ensuing incidents. This perceptive account - written shortly after the author left his post as Deputy Director of the Berlin Task Force in 1964 - deduces much more. It details, for example, the Soviet efforts to interfere with air access, the Berlin role in the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the Soviet attempt to control the movement of convoys to West Berlin. The author also gives an account of Kennedy's efforts to reach an agreement with Khrushchev on Berlin and the problems this caused with America's allies. In addition, the author has selected some of the key documents related to the crisis, including a briefing he gave Kennedy about Berlin planning and a record of the discussion at the briefing between Kennedy and Secretary of Defense McNamara about nuclear weapons. Finally, Ausland's personal depictions of Kennedy and accounts of what was said off the record are also illuminating and frequently amusing.

Ausland's book is a revealing account of the Kennedy years of the Berlin crisis by a member of the Berlin Task Force. The task force set an innovative organizational pattern for the handling of subsequent crises within the U.S. government. A valuable aspect of the book is the documentary annexation that edifies the most serious and formative crisis of the Cold War and the most sensitive aspects of Berlin contingency planning. Some of the documents have never been published before.

John C. Ausland was born in 1920 in Wisconsin, USA. After serving as an officer in World War II and graduating from Princeton University, he joined the U.S. Foreign Service in 1949. In addition to service abroad, he held two posts in the State Department. After retiring in 1974, he wrote several books and was a contributor to the International Herald Tribune. He died in May 1996.