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eBook Liberation Square: Inside the Egyptian Revolution and the Rebirth of a Nation download
Politics
Author: Ashraf Khalil
ISBN: 1250006694
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Pages 336 pages
Publisher St. Martin's Press; Complete Numbers Starting with 1, 1st Ed edition (January 3, 2012)
Language English
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 621
ePUB size: 1272 kb
FB2 size: 1100 kb
DJVU size: 1995 kb
Other formats: lrf mobi azw lrf

eBook Liberation Square: Inside the Egyptian Revolution and the Rebirth of a Nation download

by Ashraf Khalil


It is difficult to imagine a better guide to the Egyptian portion of the so-called Arab Spring than Khalil's book Liberation Squar. .

It is difficult to imagine a better guide to the Egyptian portion of the so-called Arab Spring than Khalil's book Liberation Squar.offers plenty of wisdom, along with action-packed reportage, along the way. ―Christian Science Monitor. Compelling, nuanced, and engaging. Blends astute observations with reportage of the demonstrations as they unfolded.

Liberation Square book. In early 2011, the worldâs attention was riveted on Cairo, where after three decades of supremacy, Hosni Mubarak was driven from. In early 2011, the world’s attention was riveted on Cairo, where after three decades of supremacy, Hosni Mubarak was driven from power. It was a re. (London)

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Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. In early 2011, the world's attention was riveted on Cairo, where after three decades of supremacy, Hosni Mubarak was driven from power. It was a revolution as swift as it was explosive.

As a journalist based in Cairo, Ashraf Khalil was an eyewitness to the perfect storm that brought down Mubarak and his regime.

It was a revolution as swift as it was explosive. As a journalist based in Cairo, Ashraf Khalil was an eyewitness to the perfect storm that brought down Mubarak and his regime.

Inside the Egyptian Revolution and the Rebirth of a Nation. After pictures of his brutalized body were disseminated online, many Egyptians understood the gravity of the situation-anyone could be killed in the same way. Khalil’s discussion of the role of the Internet and social media provides insight into how large numbers of people were organized to achieve specific objectives-for example, converging on Cairo's squares and other public areas. St. Martin's Griffin. It is difficult to imagine a better guide to the Egyptian portion of the so-called Arab Spring than Khalil's book Liberation Squar. -Christian Science Monitor.

A definitive, absorbing account of the Egyptian revolution, written by a Cairo-based Egyptian-American reporter for Foreign Policy and The Times (London), who witnessed firsthand Mubarak's demise and the country's efforts to build a democracy

In early 2011, the world's attention was riveted on Cairo, where after three decades of supremacy, Hosni Mubarak was driven from power. It was a revolution as swift as it was explosive. For eighteen days, anger, defiance, and resurgent national pride reigned in the streets---protestors of all ages struck back against police and state security, united toward the common goal of liberation.

But the revolution was more than a spontaneous uprising. It was the end result of years of mounting tension, brought on by a state that shamelessly abused its authority, rigging elections, silencing opposition, and violently attacking its citizens. When revolution bloomed in the region in January 2011, Egypt was a country whose patience had expired---with a people suddenly primed for liberation.

As a journalist based in Cairo, Ashraf Khalil was an eyewitness to the perfect storm that brought down Mubarak and his regime. Khalil was subjected to tear gas alongside protestors in Tahrir Square, barely escaped an enraged mob, and witnessed the day-to-day developments from the frontlines. From the halls of power to the back alleys of Cairo, he offers a one-of-a-kind look at a nation in the throes of an uprising.

Liberation Square is a revealing and dramatic look at the revolution that transformed the modern history of one of the world's oldest civilizations.

from earth
This is an excellent overview of the events of Tahrir Square. The author succeeds in giving a sense of the reasons for the revolution, the events preceding it that helped make it inevitable, as well as some key events and apprehensions during the revolt itself. There is some commentary on an array of things from Egyptian politics, culture, religion, and news organization to give the reader a meaningful appreciation for the difficulties that Egyptians have faced. Overcoming a complete lack of democracy will be difficult, but democratic institutions he sees as critical to ensuring the future success of the country.
iSlate
So many "experts" have written on the revolution from their comfortable seats in the US and Europe, but Ashraf Khalil has lived through and written on all the major conflicts in the Middle East over the last two decades, and as this compelling read shows, Egypt is no exception. As an American journalist and Egyptian living in Cairo he has the real credibility, insight, and hands on experience to take readers on a compelling journey to Tahrir Square, where he spent most of the revolution. I recommend this book highly to anyone who wants to understand Egypt today and the seeds and future of the revolution.
Tcaruieb
The author lays a clear and comprehensive outline of Mubarak's rise to power and describes the make-up and effects of the regime on Egyptian life. The sense of hopelessness and despair the author portrays is consistent with my own feelings and observations from living in Cairo for over three years. This book is thoroughly documents and gives voice to people of all stations in Egypt, while also being highly readable and informative to a non-Egyptian readership that is interested in what happened during this tumultuous times. This level of objectivity and investigation is what all journalists should strive for.
Qwne
I recommend this book to people who are living outside of egypt. Personally being Egyptian but emigrated when I was young. I really love this book.
Vetibert
Ashraf Khalil's "Liberation Square" is a smart and lucid view of the 2011 Egyptian Revolution. Khalil is an Egyptian journalist who has worked for the LA Times. He has the benefit of understanding the politics and personalities of Egypt, while being able to communicate effectively to an American audience. The story takes a few chapters to take off, but include the highlights and prime movers of the revolution and its immediate aftermath. He sets the stage of an Egypt in which corruption is endemic, and well-educated men have little chance of getting a job, and hence getting married. Khalil see the hopelessness of young men about having sex as a primary factor in the rage of the protesters. He discusses the tireless work of long-suffering political activists, who laid the groundwork over years, finally bearing fruit in January 2011. He tells of Khaled Saieed, the unlikely martyr, beaten and killed by Egyptian Security forces, whose ordinary looks and middle-class aspirations allowed so many Egyptians to identify with the protesters. He describes the effect of YouTube videos by Asmaa Mahfouz, a young female activist whose stirring words dared her male counterparts to come to the protests.

Khalil is frank. He is clear the Tahrir Square would not have been possible with the prior example of the Tunisia uprising. He highlights the widespread non-violent protests while acknowledging the role of violent and rageful rock-throwers. He speaks of the Mohammed ElBaradei's irrelevance to the revolution. He speaks of Muslim Brotherhood, an organization once banned from a role in Egyptian politics, its initial lack participation in the revolution and its eventual rise in prominence. Khalil speaks of the regime's use of the Brotherhood as a bogeyman to frighten moderates. He respects the group's organizational abilities, but tempers the fears of those worried about its post-revolution status. The group, he feels, is not as monolithic as outsides think, and will diminish in power when faced with open elections.

"Liberation Square" provides a ground-up view of a popular movement to overthrow a dictator and his ruthless security apparatus. It is a story of a people finally fed up with living in fear, lies and hopelessness, taking their destiny in their own hands. It is informative and inspiring look at how many factors combine to move a people to overthrow their shackles and live as free people