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Politics
Author: Richard Kearney,Kascha Semonovitch
ISBN: 0823234622
Subcategory: Philosophy
Pages 362 pages
Publisher Fordham University Press; 1 edition (May 2, 2011)
Language English
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.3
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ePUB size: 1861 kb
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eBook Phenomenologies of the Stranger: Between Hostility and Hospitality (Perspectives in Continental Philosophy) download

by Richard Kearney,Kascha Semonovitch


Richard Kearney is the Charles Seelig Professor of Philosophy at Boston College

ISBN-13: 978-0823234622. Richard Kearney is the Charles Seelig Professor of Philosophy at Boston College. He is the author of over 20 books, among them the trilogy The God Who May Be (Indiana University Press, 2001), On Stories (Routledge, 2002), and Strangers, Gods, and Monsters (Routledge, 2003), as well as works including Debates in Continental Philosophy (Fordham University Press, 2004), and Anatheism (Columbia, 2011).

Between Hostility and Hospitality or any other file from Books category .

Download Phenomenologies of the Stranger: Between Hostility and Hospitality or any other file from Books category. Most philosophical attempts to understand the role of the Stranger, human or transcendent, have been limited to standard epistemological problems of other minds, metaphysical substances, body/soul dualism and related issues of consciousness and cognition. How do humans sensethe dimension of the strange and alien in different religions, arts, and cultures? How do the five physical senses relate to the spiritual senses, especially the famous sixthsense, as portals to an encounter with the Other?

What exactly do embodied imaginariesof hospitality and hostility entail, and how do they . Ricouer (as quoted by Kearney and Semonovitch 2011).

Ricouer (as quoted by Kearney and Semonovitch 2011). This book proposes that community development has been increasingly influenced and co-opted by a modernist, soulless, rational philosophy - reducing it to a shallow technique for 'solving community problems'.

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Home Browse Books Book details, Phenomenologies of the Stranger: Between. Richard kearney and kascha semonovitch

Home Browse Books Book details, Phenomenologies of the Stranger: Between. Phenomenologies of the Stranger: Between Hostility and Hospitality. By Kascha Semonovitch, Richard Kearney. Richard kearney and kascha semonovitch. What we desire, more than a season or weather, is the comfort Of being strangers, at least to ourselves.

RICHARD KEARNEY and KASCHA SEMONOVITCH . This volume plays host to a number of texts that serve as phenomenologies of the stranger. From the perspective of these authors situated in North America and Europe, responding to strangers matters a great deal. How does the stranger enter into philosophy? Let me voice a preliminary scruple: What permits us in the first place to affirm that the philosopher necessarily encounters the question of the stranger? Consider Wittgenstein’sTractatus.

We encounter strangers when we are not at home: when we are in a foreign land or a foreign part of our own land.

What is strange? Or better, who is strange? When do we encounter the strange? We encounter strangers when we are not at home: when we are in a foreign land or a foreign part of our own land. From Freud to Lacan to Kristeva to Heidegger, the feeling of strangeness-das Unheimlichkeit-has marked our encounter with the other, even the other within our self.

Richard Kearney and Kascha Semonovitch (New York: Fordham .

Richard Kearney and Kascha Semonovitch (New York: Fordham University Press, 2011). Traversing the Heart: Journeys of the Inter-religious Imagination, ed. Richard Kearney and Eileen Rizo-Patron. Imagining the Sacred Stranger: Hostility or Hospitality?’ in Politics and the Religious Imagination, ed Jens Zimmerman, New York : Routledge, 2010.

Or better, who is strange? When do we encounter the stranger? This volume takes the question of hosting the Stranger to the deeper level of embodied imagination & the senses. Series: Perspectives in continental philosophy. File: PDF, . 6 MB. Читать онлайн. Abstract: Chiefly proceedings of a conference held in 2009 at Boston College. Categories: Other Social Sciences\Philosophy.

What is strange? Or better, who is strange? When do we encounter the stranger? This volume takes the question of hosting the Stranger to the deeper level of embodied imagination & the senses. Fordham Perspectives in Continental Philosophy.

What is strange? Or better, who is strange? When do we encounter the strange? We encounter strangers when we are not at home: when we are in a foreign land or a foreign part of our own land. From Freud to Lacan to Kristeva to Heidegger, the feeling of strangeness―das Unheimlichkeit―has marked our encounter with the other, even the other within our self. Most philosophical attempts to understand the role of the Stranger, human or transcendent, have been limited to standard epistemological problems of other minds, metaphysical substances, body/soul dualism and related issues of consciousness and cognition. This volume endeavors to take the question of hosting the stranger to the deeper level of embodied imagination and the senses (in the Greek sense of aisthesis).

This volume plays host to a number of encounters with the strange. It asks such questions as: How does the embodied imagination relate to the Stranger in terms of hospitality or hostility (given the common root of hostis as both host and enemy)? How do we distinguish between projections of fear or fascination, leading to either violence or welcome? How do humans “sense” the dimension of the strange and alien in different religions, arts, and cultures? How do the five physical senses relate to the spiritual senses, especially the famous “sixth” sense, as portals to an encounter with the Other? Is there a carnal perception of alterity, which would operate at an affective, prereflective, preconscious level? What exactly do “embodied imaginaries” of hospitality and hostility entail, and how do they operate in language, psychology, and social interrelations (including racism, xenophobia, and scapegoating)? And what, finally, are the topical implications of these questions for an ethics and practice of tolerance and peace?