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Politics
Author: Kwame Anthony Appiah
ISBN: 0393071626
Subcategory: Philosophy
Pages 288 pages
Publisher W. W. Norton & Company; First Edition edition (September 13, 2010)
Language English
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 374
ePUB size: 1648 kb
FB2 size: 1150 kb
DJVU size: 1394 kb
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eBook The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen download

by Kwame Anthony Appiah


Kwame Anthony Appiah pens the Ethicist column for the New York Times, and is the author of the prize-winning Cosmopolitanism, among many other works. A professor of philosophy and law at New York University, Appiah lives in New York. Библиографические данные.

Kwame Anthony Appiah pens the Ethicist column for the New York Times, and is the author of the prize-winning Cosmopolitanism, among many other works. The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen. Kwame Anthony Appiah.

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Kwame Anthony Appiah pens the Ethicist column for the New York Times, and is the author of the prize-winning . In THE HONOR CODE Appiah analyzes these four examples to illustrate how traditional beliefs about honor came to be in sharp contrast with evolving views of morality. In each case, arguments against the practices were well known long before they were given up, but knowledge alone wasn't enough.

How does moral progress happen? How are societies brought to repudiate immoral customs they have long accepted? In The Honor Code, Kwame Anthony Appiah explores a long-neglected engine of reform. Examining moral revolutions in the past-and campaigns against abhorrent practices today-he shows that appeals to reason, morality, or religion aren’t enough to ring in reform. Praise for The Honor Code. What causes moral progress? In this brilliant book, Anthony Appiah casts light on the role played by honor. This classical concept can be a lodestar in guiding us to a better future. It’s an amazing and fascinating insight.

Kwame Anthony Appiah is a Cambridge-educated philosopher, and one of America's foremost public intellectuals. In it Appiah discusses four different historical episodes

Kwame Anthony Appiah is a Cambridge-educated philosopher, and one of America's foremost public intellectuals. Uniquely cosmopolitan by birth and upbringing, he has written extensively and intelligently about race, identity, Afrocentrism, history, colonialism and morality. He sounds an urbane and civilised note when discussing what are often raucous and rancorous issues. But the civilised note is quietly compelling, and never more so than in this latest book. In it Appiah discusses four different historical episodes. In three of them moral revolutions took place, and in the fourth another.

Kwame Anthony Appiah speculates on what finally did away with foot-binding, dueling and slavery. But as Kwame Anthony Appiah argues in his plaintive and elegant new book, The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen, countries yearn for the respect of their peers as well, and that yearning can be leveraged. When it comes to ending abhorrent practices - whether foot binding a century ago or torture today - appealing to a nation’s sense of honor is as vital as appealing to its sense of morality, religion or reason.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Why, Kwame Anthony Appiah asks, do they happen? .

Why, Kwame Anthony Appiah asks, do they happen? He argues rightly that these changes are not simply a matter of new or better moral arguments coming to light. In the case of duelling, the church had long considered it immoral. In contemporary Pakistan the maintenance of family honour may require the murder of a daughter who has been raped.

The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen. Appiah, Kwame Anthony (1995), "Philosophy and necessary questions", in Kwame, Safro (e., Readings in African philosophy: an Akan collection, Lanham: University Press of America, pp. 1–22, ISBN 9780819199119. New York: W. W. Norton. Appiah, K. Anthony (1996), "Race, culture, identity: misunderstood connections", in Peterson, Grethe B. (e., The Tanner lectures on human values XVII, Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, pp. 51–136, ISBN 9780585197708.

In this landmark work, a leading philosopher demonstrates the revolutionary power of honor in ending human suffering.

Long neglected as an engine of reform, honor strikingly emerges at the center of our modern world in Kwame Anthony Appiah's The Honor Code. Over the last few centuries, new democratic movements have led to the emancipation of women, slaves, and the oppressed. But what drove these modern changes, Appiah argues, was not imposing legislation from above, but harnessing the ancient power of honor from within. In gripping detail, he explores the end of the duel in aristocratic England, the tumultuous struggles over footbinding in nineteenth-century China, and the uprising of ordinary people against Atlantic slavery. Finally, he confronts the horrors of "honor killing" in contemporary Pakistan, where rape victims are murdered by their relatives. He argues that honor, used to justify the practice, can also be the most effective weapon against it. Intertwining philosophy and historical narrative, Appiah has created a remarkably dramatic work, which demonstrates that honor is the driving force in the struggle against man's inhumanity to man.
Ndav
I ordered this book because I saw someone cite it, on the topic of 'honor." The one thing I'd praise most highly about Appiah's book is its easy flow of expository analysis, its logical and orderly layout, and its very clear explanations. His writing style is engrossing and thought-provoking. I am using it as nightly reading, and I'm having a hard time putting it down for the night, after reading for awhile. He's really got me to thinking - and I've thought of a lot of comparisons with what's going on in the the US right now. Some other reviewer was disappointed because Appiah doesn't offer solutions for current problems. But I don't think his book needs to offer that. What his book does is to get you to thinking about solutions based on the cases he discusses, where he shows how people solved problems that seemed deeply ingrained and unsolvable. When I first started reading the book, I didn't think I was going to be interested in English dueling. I had never thought about it before. But Appiah made it interesting and compelling, the same way he has done with Chinese foot-binding, slavery, and honor killings of women. I've learned some interesting history along the way, and I've thoroughly enjoyed reading the book.
Gathris
Dueling, foot-binding, slavery and "honor" killings were once considered honorable practices but today most people find them repellent. In THE HONOR CODE Appiah analyzes these four examples to illustrate how traditional beliefs about honor came to be in sharp contrast with evolving views of morality. In each case, arguments against the practices were well known long before they were given up, but knowledge alone wasn't enough. "Honor" killing has not been completely eliminated, but for each of the other practices Appiah details how the development of an expanded, less insular world view or "honor world" changed cultural beliefs and overthrew these long held customs. With this book Appiah is hoping to help spark modern moral revolutions.

Appiah talks about what these modern revolutions might be in an excellent September 2010 article in the Washington Post. Just as we look back with horror at slavery and foot binding, people in the future may condemn one or more of our current practices. To determine what might cause our descendants to wonder "What were they thinking?!" Appiah provides three guidelines: first, arguments against the practice have long been in place, second, defenders of the practice cite tradition, human nature or necessity as reasons to continue (How could we grow cotton without slaves?), and third, supporters of the practice engage in strategic ignorance, for instance wearing slave-grown cotton without considering where it comes from. Appiah's contemporary candidates for moral revolutions include industrial meat production, the current prison system, the institutionalization and isolation of the elderly, and the devastation of the environment.

Appiah is a philosophy professor at Princeton and his writing is sometimes a little choppy in a logician's proof solving style, but the material is well thought out, timely and fascinating.
Vojar
This is an important book and I really loved read Professor Appiah's case studies of dueling, foot binding, slavery, and finally honor killing. He has a simple but brilliant insight-- that social codes and norms often restrict our ability to act and conflict with reason, morality, and humanity. Prestige, respect, and honor are major motivations. Unfortunately, Professor Appiah does not have any terrific answers for a quandry such as honor killing in many Muslim or Middle Eastern/South Asian societies. In the end, his message is hopeful; mankind can move ahead in some quantum leaps such as when it abandoned foot binding and dueling. It is fascinating to consider what outdated mores we hold now that future generations will scratch their heads at.
Jothris
The incoming freshmen at Princeton University were assigned to read this book over the summer by the President. My boss encouraged our entire department to read it as well. I knew little about the history of the duel, foot binding, slavery and abolition, and treatment of women around the world. This book, clearly written and engaging, provides details, examples and historical context for how all these practices evolved and ultimately met their demise, though the treatment of women in many parts of the world leaves much to be desired. I look forward to discussing the lessons of this book with my colleagues and how we develop and participate in our own "honor code" practices.
Kigul
This fabulous book needs to be on the secondary school curriculum - philosophy made readable and relevant
Qusicam
My book club chose to read this book. I was disappointed because he had a very minor pint to make, and took a long time to make it. He brings three examples to illustrate his point. Perhaps if he had brought them in a different order, it might have been more interesting. He starts with the history of dueling in England,and it's demise. He had to redefine all the ways common words are usually understood, and this made it difficult to follow him.
At the end, he didn't bring it down to the level of the common man, and what he might/should do to make the world a better place.
Jeronashe
Thoughtful analysis, clearly expressed. I listened to the Audible book, narrated by the author. It was required reading for a class in Public Ethics, but I would gladly read this book even if not required. Credible explanation of how social change happens.
Clear, accessible, and thought provoking. I would assign to a business class. He makes concepts seem simple.