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Politics
Author: William W. Fitzhugh,Jacqueline S. Olin
ISBN: 1560981717
Subcategory: Archaeology
Pages 271 pages
Publisher Smithsonian; First Edition edition (March 17, 1993)
Language English
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 829
ePUB size: 1278 kb
FB2 size: 1234 kb
DJVU size: 1282 kb
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eBook Archaeology of the Frobisher Voyages download

by William W. Fitzhugh,Jacqueline S. Olin


Archeology of the Frobisher Voyages. 2000 (exhibition catalogue) (Society for American Archaeology Annual Book Award winner for 2001).

Archeology of the Frobisher Voyages. 288 pp. Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press. 368 pp. Honoring Our Elders: History of Eastern Arctic Archaeology. A Festschrift to Elmer Harp Jr.

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Archit frobisher voyages. WW Fitzhugh, JS Olin. Prehistoric maritime adaptations of the circumpolar zone, 339-386, 1975. Walter de Gruyter, 2011. Arctic sea-ice decline archived by multicentury annual-resolution record from crustose coralline algal proxy. J Halfar, WH Adey, A Kronz, S Hetzinger, E Edinger, WW Fitzhugh. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 110 (49), 19737-19741, 2013. Biogeographical archaeology in the eastern North American Arctic. Prehistoric maritime adaptations of the circumpolar zone.

Archaeology of the Frobisher Voyages. by William W. Fitzhugh, Jacqueline S. Olin. Coauthors & Alternates. ISBN 9781560981718 (978-1-56098-171-8) Hardcover, Smithsonian, 1993.

Personal Name: Fitzhugh, William . 1943 . On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book

Personal Name: Fitzhugh, William . 1943-. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

Science in the Subarctic: Trappers, Traders, and the Smithsonian Institution. The Meta Incognita Project. Contributions to Field Studies. MUCH of our knowledge of prehistoric peoples of North America comes from the study of their utilisation of imperishable lithic (geological) resources.

Neutron activation analysis, x-ray diffraction, and petrographic analysis were used to obtain evidence of the origin of pottery and ceramic . Archeology of the Frobisher voyages. William W.

Neutron activation analysis, x-ray diffraction, and petrographic analysis were used to obtain evidence of the origin of pottery and ceramic sherds found in the New World and related to the Spanis.

Fitzhugh, William . and Jacqueline S. Archeology of the Frobisher Voyages: Contributions to the Archeology of Kodlunarn Island, Frobisher Bay, . Report submitted to the Government of the Northwest Territories, Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Center, Yellowknife, .

The three expeditions (1576-1578) of English explorer Martin Frobisher were among the most ambitious and best documented of the early period of British colonial expansion. Sailing into the Canadian Arctic in search of the Northwest Passage to the Orient, Frobisher established the first, albeit transient, English settlement in the New World, bringing back to Europe not the route to Cathay but news of his encounters with Inuit peoples and tons of what he vainly hoped was gold ore.Archeology of the Frobisher Voyages draws from the material remains of the Frobisher site (houses, mines, workshops, and ship ways) and of local contemporary Inuit sites and Inuit oral history the fullest account yet available of this earliest New World settlement. The contributors are archeologists, historians, and ethnographers who discuss the background and history of the Frobisher voyages and previous investigations of the site, particularly that of Charles Francis Hall, an American explorer who in 1861 was led by Inuit legend to camp on Kodlunarn or "white man's" island, off the southern coast of Baffin Island.Examining artifacts collected by Hall as well as new evidence gathered in three Smithsonian Institution research trips, the contributors reassess the structures and activities of Frobisher's men and the Inuit with whom they traded and fought. One artifact - a lump of iron yielding a problematic carbon-14 date two centuries before Frobisher landed - was collected by Charles Francis Hall and given to the Smithsonian in the nineteenth century. Three more of these artifacts were collected at Kodlunarn in the 1981 research trip, and their origins remain a mystery.