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eBook Guarding New Jersey's Shore: Lighthouses and Life-Saving Stations (NJ) (Images of America) download
Photo and Art
Author: David Veasey
ISBN: 0738504173
Subcategory: Photography & Video
Pages 128 pages
Publisher Arcadia Publishing; Images of America Series edition (May 28, 2000)
Language English
Category: Photo and Art
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 864
ePUB size: 1329 kb
FB2 size: 1938 kb
DJVU size: 1253 kb
Other formats: rtf mbr txt lrf

eBook Guarding New Jersey's Shore: Lighthouses and Life-Saving Stations (NJ) (Images of America) download

by David Veasey


Guarding New Jersey's Shore book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Guarding New Jersey's Shore book. Start by marking Guarding New Jersey's Shore: Lighthouses and Life-Saving Stations (Images of America: New Jersey) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

To ensure their safe passage, a series of lighthouses was built and the .

The "Images of America" are such incredible books. His depth of knowledge on the topic of Oregon's ligthouses and life-saving stations and their architectural styles is unparalleled. I have liked everyone one of them! Pictures and history of an area are so nicely done. Life-saving stations, as a class, are among the most endangered buildings in America.

Arcadia Publishing publishes book, Guarding New Jersey's Shore: Lighthouses and Life-Saving Stations, written by David . He tells readers that the United States Life-Saving Service, a forerunner of the Coast Guard, started in New Jersey.

Arcadia Publishing publishes book, Guarding New Jersey's Shore: Lighthouses and Life-Saving Stations, written by David Veasey; photo (By the Way column) (S. There are photos of early members and of stations, of which 20 stand. We are continually improving the quality of our text archives.

The Life Saving Station remains used by the New Jersey State Police today, however, the lighthouse was boarded up and left unused . Guarding New Jersey's Shore:: Lighthouses and Life-Saving Stations. Arcadia Publishing, 2000. Cole, John Young, and Henry Hope Reed.

The Life Saving Station remains used by the New Jersey State Police today, however, the lighthouse was boarded up and left unused until 1982 when locals petitioned to take over the building. In 1986, the light (DCB-24) was transferred from the skeletal tower into the lighthouse. The grounds were taken over by North Wildwood's superintendent of parks, Steve Murray.

Chatham, MA (Cape Cod) -beautiful shot of the Coast Guard Station Chatham's Near-shore Lifeboat 42003 and Aunt Lydia's cove, courtesy of Oakwood.

The Monomoy Life-saving Station was built in 1873-74 and was one of the original nine stations built on Cape Cod. It was deactivated in the 1930s and the property was transferred to the Fish and Wildlife Service in 1955 as part of the formation of the Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge. This photo is c. 1905, when Seth Ellis was the station keeper. Chatham, MA (Cape Cod) -beautiful shot of the Coast Guard Station Chatham's Near-shore Lifeboat 42003 and Aunt Lydia's cove, courtesy of Oakwood Photography/James R.

Guarding New Jersey's Shore: Lighthouses and Life-Saving Stations. Being a pastor in the Atlantic City District of the African Methodist Episcopal church, I found this to be a great and very informative book. Naval Air Station Atlantic City. On Arcadia Publishing.

The New Jersey Life Saving Service was established on August 9, 1854. David Veasey (2000). Guarding New Jersey's Shore: Lighthouses and Life-Saving Stations. Samuel Chadwick was appointed the first lifeguard in 1856 The station was transferred to the United States Life-Saving Service in 1898 On November 30, 1896 the schooner Bertha Warner ran aground and the station saved all but one ma.

From the seventeenth to the twentieth century, New Jersey’s low-lying, sandy coast has been the site of thousands of shipwrecks as ships bound for New York City or Philadelphia foundered on its offshore shoals. As coastal and international trade dramatically increased after the War of 1812, the federal government was forced to increase safety aids to mariners. To ensure their safe passage, a series of lighthouses was built and the U.S. Life-Saving Service was created. More than two centuries of the history of New Jersey’s treacherous coast are preserved in Guarding New Jersey’s Shore: Lighthouses and Life-Saving Stations. Gathered from a wide array of sources, more than 200 historic photographs and fascinating, documented text combine to create the only illustrated history of the state’s thirty-eight lighthouses and forty-one life-saving stations. Sandy Hook, built in 1764, is thenation’s oldest operating lighthouse. Navesink’s Twin Lights was the first lighthouse to use electricity and was the home of Marconi’s early radioexperiments. From the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor, which once served as a lighthouse, to Cape May Point, and up the Delaware Bay and River, the fascinating story of protecting mariners from perils“Down the Shore” is presented and preserved in Guarding New Jersey’s Shore: Lighthouses and Life-Saving Stations.
Broadcaster
Sweet book! Has much about New Jersey Lighthouses that you can't find in modern lighthouse books including vintage photos.
showtime
A very nice book that blends lots of history and a little technology into the annotations of literally hundreds of photos. The book covers lighthouses, lightships, harbor lights, coastal lights as well as a facinating description of the US Life-Saving Service which, along with the Revenue Cutter Service, later became the US Coast Guard. The only reason that I did not give a rating of 5 was because I feel that there should be maps that show where the various lights were/are.
Ndyardin
Purchased this book to help my son do his NJ 4th Grade Fair Project and by the time we were done with the book and finished with the several month long project, the bindings were worn out and all pages were dog-eared. This book ended up being more informative that a lot of stuff that we found on the internet and in the local library.
Nayatol
If you're into coastal NJ history (prior to Superstorm Sandy), this is a great book about those who have guarded the seacoast over a couple of hundred years.
greatest
I wonderful look into the guardians of the New Jersey coastline. Especially interesting was the pictures of Old Orchard Shoal Light that was recently destroyed during Hurricane Sandy.
Goldenfang
It is a forgotten Federal Agency. Its peak years were from 1878 to 1915. It was the United State Life Saving Service. Lifesavers were popular folk heroes, storm warriors. It was started in New Jersey in 1848. The New Jersey shore had more wrecks than the Outer Banks, Cape Hatteras. New Jersey is the graveyard of the Atlantic, not the Outer Banks. The book details the life saving service, light houses, light ships. There was a Light House Board in the United States Treasury Department until it merged with the Coast Guard. In 1889 the Life Saving Service became uniformed because of complaints. Lifesavers were generally recruited from local fishermen who knew surf and sea conditions. Numerous life saving stations are shown. The book exists for its pictures, which are plentiful. Basically it is a picture book. Detailed explanations are given. The plan of the book is simple and forthright. We had occasion to use the book just this morning to plan an outing to see a restored stucture. Indeed, there it was, pictured, in this highly useful book.
Onoxyleili
This small book on lighthouses is just chock full of fascinating information and wonderful historic photographs. If you have any interest at all in lighthouses, you should really love it. I recommend it enthusiastically! This is a special book.
Sweet book! Has much about New Jersey Lighthouses that you can't find in modern lighthouse books including vintage photos.
A very nice book that blends lots of history and a little technology into the annotations of literally hundreds of photos. The book covers lighthouses, lightships, harbor lights, coastal lights as well as a facinating description of the US Life-Saving Service which, along with the Revenue Cutter Service, later became the US Coast Guard. The only reason that I did not give a rating of 5 was because I feel that there should be maps that show where the various lights were/are.
Purchased this book to help my son do his NJ 4th Grade Fair Project and by the time we were done with the book and finished with the several month long project, the bindings were worn out and all pages were dog-eared. This book ended up being more informative that a lot of stuff that we found on the internet and in the local library.
If you're into coastal NJ history (prior to Superstorm Sandy), this is a great book about those who have guarded the seacoast over a couple of hundred years.
I wonderful look into the guardians of the New Jersey coastline. Especially interesting was the pictures of Old Orchard Shoal Light that was recently destroyed during Hurricane Sandy.
It is a forgotten Federal Agency. Its peak years were from 1878 to 1915. It was the United State Life Saving Service. Lifesavers were popular folk heroes, storm warriors. It was started in New Jersey in 1848. The New Jersey shore had more wrecks than the Outer Banks, Cape Hatteras. New Jersey is the graveyard of the Atlantic, not the Outer Banks. The book details the life saving service, light houses, light ships. There was a Light House Board in the United States Treasury Department until it merged with the Coast Guard. In 1889 the Life Saving Service became uniformed because of complaints. Lifesavers were generally recruited from local fishermen who knew surf and sea conditions. Numerous life saving stations are shown. The book exists for its pictures, which are plentiful. Basically it is a picture book. Detailed explanations are given. The plan of the book is simple and forthright. We had occasion to use the book just this morning to plan an outing to see a restored stucture. Indeed, there it was, pictured, in this highly useful book.
This small book on lighthouses is just chock full of fascinating information and wonderful historic photographs. If you have any interest at all in lighthouses, you should really love it. I recommend it enthusiastically! This is a special book.