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Author: Jacques Barzun
ISBN: 0226038610
Subcategory: Music
Pages 448 pages
Publisher University Of Chicago Press; Phoenix ed edition (August 15, 1982)
Language English
Category: Photo and Art
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 537
ePUB size: 1744 kb
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eBook Berlioz and His Century: An Introduction to the Age of Romanticism download

by Jacques Barzun


Berlioz and His Century book.

Berlioz and His Century book. In this abridgment of his monumental study, Berlioz and the. In this abridgment of his monumental study, Berlioz and the Romantic Century, Jacques Barzun recounts the events and extraordinary achievements of the great composer's life against the background of the romantic era.

Berlioz and His Century" consequently retains (like all of Barzun's narratives) both historical importance and present relevance in the full extent of its range, while remembering the real and finite experiences of the individual.

Berlioz and His Century" consequently retains (like all of Barzun's narratives) both historical importance and present relevance in the full extent of its range, while remembering the real and finite experiences of the individual figures who made their times important and relevant. 21 people found this helpful.

Jacques Barzun is an unapologetic advocate of great men (and women) and, in one of his most subtle philosophical veins, he has here comprehensively treated Berlioz as such an entity- rather than a style, technique, or eccentric- within the contemporary and personal world that the composer.

Jacques Barzun is an unapologetic advocate of great men (and women) and, in one of his most subtle philosophical veins, he has here comprehensively treated Berlioz as such an entity- rather than a style, technique, or eccentric- within the contemporary and personal world that the composer occupied and was occupied by. The designation of Berlioz, along with Keats, as The Romantic Genius, has cemented his place in the general surveys of musical and 19th century history.

In this abridgment of his monumental study, Berlioz and the Romantic Century, Jacques Barzun . As the author eloquently demonstrates, Berloiz was an archetype whose destiny was the story of an age, the incarnation of an artistic style and a historical spirit.

In this abridgment of his monumental study, Berlioz and the Romantic Century, Jacques Barzun recounts the events and extraordinary achievements of the great composer's life against the background of the romantic era.

Meridian Books, 1956 - 448 sayfa. As someone w/o a lot of interest in classical music, I picked this up because Barzun wrote it and was very pleasantly surprised. it really gave me some new perspectives on the history of this kind of music. Tam incelemeyi okuyun.

Jacques Barzun continued to write on education and cultural history after retiring from Columbia. 1982 Berlioz and His Century: An Introduction to the Age of Romanticism (Abridgment of Berlioz and the Romantic Century). University of Chicago Press. At 84 years of age, he began writing his swan song, to which he devoted the better part of the 1990s. As the author eloquently demonstrates, Berloiz.

Together, let's build an Open Library for the World. an introduction to the age of romanticism. Phoenix ed. by Jacques Barzun. Published 1982 by University of Chicago Press in Chicago.

Translated with introduction by Jacques Barzun, 1956. Berlioz and His Century: An Introduction to the Age of Romanticism. What the book makes clear is the sheer variety of forms that flowed into the cinematic mainstream

Translated with introduction by Jacques Barzun, 1956. Reprint, with foreword by Peter Bloom, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999. Translation of Les soirées de l'orchestre (1852). Reprint, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1982. What the book makes clear is the sheer variety of forms that flowed into the cinematic mainstream. For this reason alone, Mungen has provided a valuable work of historical differentiation, whatever its status as a work of film theory.

In this abridgment of his monumental study, Berlioz and the Romantic Century, Jacques Barzun recounts the events and extraordinary achievements of the great composer's life against the background of the romantic era. As the author eloquently demonstrates, Berloiz was an archetype whose destiny was the story of an age, the incarnation of an artistic style and a historical spirit. "In order to understand the nineteenth century, it is essential to understand Berlioz," notes W. H. Auden, "and in order to understand Berlioz, it is essential to read Professor Barzun."
Agalas
Even though this book was written before David Cairns' exhaustive two-volume biography, I think it's the best biography of Berlioz. This is largely because Barzun intelligence, erudition, and literary gifts are superior to Cairns'--which isn't to say that Cairns book isn't well-written and perceptive, just that it isn't quite up to Barzun's standard even though it's clearly more up-to-date in biographical matters.
Low_Skill_But_Happy_Deagle
Jacques Barzun is an unapologetic advocate of great men (and women) and, in one of his most subtle philosophical veins, he has here comprehensively treated Berlioz as such an entity- rather than a style, technique, or eccentric- within the contemporary and personal world that the composer occupied and was occupied by.

The designation of Berlioz, along with Keats, as The Romantic Genius, has cemented his place in the general surveys of musical and 19th century history. Sustained equally by the overly-emphasized program of "Symphonie Fantastique" and the easily recountable breaking of his engagement to Camille Moke- Berlioz as a Personality could be as easily subsumed in a general, genteely eccentric, demi-Napoleonic, bohemian Romantic "character".

Barzun does not reject the singleness of the Romantic era, as he might have done, in questioning the existence of such an all-encompassing character for it; but explains the depth, the real pragmatism and sense of great morality, on all sides, by which the new generations of necessarily market-dependant artists were precluded by the more aristocratic-minded institutions that fostered them. Berlioz stood in the earliest of these generations, and emerges from his environment sympathetically human. If the embodiment of a period in a single person is a cause for endless fascination (and, barring that, assignation), it is also a cause for beaurocratic tedium, financial pandering, and occasional compositions.

Barzun, having managed in one of his more recent works to extradite John Calvin from the morass of that leader's legacy, deserves admiration for the still more formidable task, in this work, of sorting out the arguments of the last two centuries concerning artistic prerogative, if not for happening yet on their solution.

"Berlioz and His Century" consequently retains (like all of Barzun's narratives) both historical importance and present relevance in the full extent of its range, while remembering the real and finite experiences of the individual figures who made their times important and relevant.