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eBook An Unsung Cat download
Photo and Art
Author: Gary Foster,Safford Chamberlain
ISBN: 0810837188
Subcategory: Music
Pages 424 pages
Publisher Scarecrow Press (December 28, 2000)
Language English
Category: Photo and Art
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 248
ePUB size: 1517 kb
FB2 size: 1550 kb
DJVU size: 1565 kb
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eBook An Unsung Cat download

by Gary Foster,Safford Chamberlain


Safford Chamberlain follows the artist from his start in youth bands like the Hollywood Canteen Kids and The .

Safford Chamberlain follows the artist from his start in youth bands like the Hollywood Canteen Kids and The Teen-Agers through his studies under Lennie Tristano. Unsung Cat is not only a many-faceted, novelistic biography by a noted jazz journalist and one of Marsh's former sax students, but a heartbreaking mystery that tortures readers with questions as deeply as it satisfies with narrative richness. That should serve as a good introduction to Marsh's work.

Books by Safford Chamberlain. An Unsung Cat. Dec 28, 2000. by Safford Chamberlain and Gary Foster.

com's Safford Chamberlain Page and shop for all Safford Chamberlain books. Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of Safford Chamberlain. Books by Safford Chamberlain.

Safford Chamberlain follows the artist from his start in youth bands like the Hollywood Canteen Kids and The . In addition to the book, Scarecrow is pleased to offer a companion compact disc, released by Storyville Records.

Safford Chamberlain follows the artist from his start in youth bands like the Hollywood Canteen Kids and The Teen-Agers through his studies under Lennie Tristano, his brilliant playing of the 1950s, his disappearance from public view in the 1960s, his re-emergence in the 1970s, and his belated recognition in the 1980s as one of the finest tenor players of the post-World War II era. Through interviews with the Marsh family and friends, Chamberlain offers an inside view of Marsh's private life, including his struggles with drug abuse.

Discover new books on Goodreads. Safford Chamberlain, Gary Foster (Foreword). See if your friends have read any of Safford Chamberlain's books. Safford Chamberlain’s Followers. None yet. Safford Chamberlain. Safford Chamberlain’s books.

Safford Chamberlain, Gary D. Foster. An Unsung Cat explores the life and music of jazz saxophonist, Warne Marsh. Safford Chamberlain follows the artist from his start in youth bands like the Hollywood Canteen Kids and The Teen-Agers through his studies under Lennie Tristano, his brilliant playing of the 1950s, his disappearance from public view in the 1960s, his re-emergence in the 1970s, and his belated recognition in the 1980s as one of the finest tenor.

An Unsung Cat explores the life and music of jazz saxophonist, Warne Marsh.

Biography, Jazz musicians.

Safford Chamberlain (Auteur), Gary Foster (Préface). An Unsung Cat explores the life and music of jazz saxophonist, Warne Marsh Lire la suite.

Author Nathaniel Foster Safford. Categories: Nonfiction.

As a companion piece to the book by Safford Chamberlain of the same name, this CD traces the musical life . Solos by Marsh and Foster swung like the Flying Wallendas.

As a companion piece to the book by Safford Chamberlain of the same name, this CD traces the musical life of Warne Marsh, the brilliant Tenor Saxophonist, from 1945 to 1987. We see Marsh as an 18 year old echoing the style of the Hawkins/Webster generation to one imbued with the spirit of Charlie Parker in a metamorphosis of incredible beauty. Author Safford Chamberlain, who was at the concert attests to the fact that Marsh, usually unflappable, was "visibly moved by the audience response". Sweet And Lovely (1987) Warne Marsh, Tenor, Larry Koonse, Guitar.

An Unsung Cat explores the life and music of jazz saxophonist, Warne Marsh. Safford Chamberlain follows the artist from his start in youth bands like the Hollywood Canteen Kids and The Teen-Agers through his studies under Lennie Tristano, his brilliant playing of the 1950s, his disappearance from public view in the 1960s, his re-emergence in the 1970s, and his belated recognition in the 1980s as one of the finest tenor players of the post-World War II era. Through interviews with the Marsh family and friends, Chamberlain offers an inside view of Marsh's private life, including his struggles with drug abuse. Detailed analysis of outstanding performances complements the personal story, while an extensively researched discography and photographs reveal the public and private face of this unique performer. In addition to the book, Scarecrow is pleased to offer a companion compact disc, released by Storyville Records. The tracks on the CD provide a representative sampling of Marsh's best work, while providing a historical overview of his development, from the beginning track, 'Apple Honey,' which is a private, low-fidelity tape from an NBC radio broadcast in 1945 of the Hoagy Carmichael Show, to the final track, 'Sweet and Lovely,' captured months before his death in 1987.
Mr_Mole
If you love Warne, you'll love the book
Lyrtois
This book is a decent read for Warne Marsh fans and has some interesting insights into Lennie Tristano and his school; awfully dry at times though.

While I really like Warne Marsh's playing, the book seems to idolize him and hold him in a much, much higher realm than I think he belongs.

Again, a good read with some very interesting information.
MarF
I have been reading about and listening to the Tristano guys for almost a year now, but was always partial to Lee Konitz. I've done some study of his playing and listened to a lot, from Tristano to present day. I am a great fan of his playing, through all the evolutions of his style.

Unfortunately, it caused me to overlook Warne Marsh on those recordings. I've read Konitz's bio and Tristano's, and picked this up to complete the set. The biography is compelling, and so very well written. I've read some horrible biographies recently, but this one just grabbed me, both with Marsh's story and the way Safford Chamberlain writes about it. Plenty of detail, without going overboard (I'm looking at YOU, Tad Szulc. Chopin admirers, don't waste your time on "Chopin in Paris"...).

Perhaps my favorite aspect of the book are the transcriptions. Chamberlain has included transcriptions of Warne Marsh solos, generally chronological through his career, and they are spaced out in the book several chapters at a time. If you can find the recordings, it's really great to watch his solos unfold. Even after reading along with the first one, my ears were opened in a new way to Warne Marsh's playing, and he has quickly become a favorite. The analysises (anylysi? Analyses? Whatever, plural, there is one with each transcription) included are also good, they point out some important things that might be overlooked.

All the information about Warne Marsh and his music is so wonderful, and compiled MASTERFULLY. The perfect amount of info, spaced and presented perfectly, and the inserted transcriptions really seal the deal.

I have since gone back to listen to the older solos, and also check out the evolution of his playing (the Red Mitchell records...my god!), and "An Unsung Cat" is so very true. Him and Konitz, from Tristano through their individual growth away from that style (while never abandoning what they gained through it), are, generally, the only two horn players I can get excited about any more (aside from the undeniable legends). They've effectively ruined most jazz for me...a mixed blessing, but my appreciation for a well constructed solo is so much deeper than a year ago, in no small part thanks to this book.

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED FOR ALL JAZZ FANS.
Olma
Safford Chamberlin's love for his subject matter, the jazz solos of the late tenor saxophonist Warne Marsh, comes out on every page of this unusually well researched and well written biography.
Marsh was a child prodigy who fell under the spell of the eccentric jazz recluse Lennie Tristano, the founder and guru of a school of highly disciplined post-bebop jazz in New York City during the late 1940's. Marsh ping-ponged between Tristano and the West Coast, mostly in relative obscurity, until he died on stage at Donte's in North Hollywood in December 1987.
Chamberlin skillfully weaves the facts of Marsh's life with details about his milieu and descriptions of his recordings. The chapters describing Marsh's early recordings with fellow Tristanoite Lee Konitz are particularly interesting. Chamberlin delicately deals with the difficult subjects of drugs, commercialism and racism in jazz music.
I have read many jazz biographies, some lurid, some sloppy and inaccurate. This one, however, treats the subject matter with the seriousness and attention to detail this wonderful music we call "jazz" deserves.
Xisyaco
My biggest complaint about Ken Burns' "Jazz" was how many great musicians were ignored. People like Herbie Nichols, Serge Chaloff, Jimmy Raney, the list is almost endless. Safford Chamberlain's book about one of the most sorely underappreciated improvisers ever is superb. It puts in human terms the struggles that almost all jazz musicians faced from the late 1940's on in trying to document a music that was falling further and further from the public view. Lee Konitz has stated "I don't know of any other musician that realy surprised me as much as Warne did with his inventiveness." Mr. Chamberlain is an excellent writer, and I hope this book helps to turn more jazz fans onto to Warne.
Bev
Mr. Chamberlain has done a great service for jazz musicians and fans with the creation of this book. One of the most refreshing points of the book (which actually sets it apart from most other jazz biographies) is that Safford is not scared to be critical of Warne and his associates, especially Lennie Tristano. The book only paints a vague picture of Warne as a person, but I interpret that as a way of showing how hard it was to really get to know the man. This is definitely a book that should be picked up to help spread the word about one of jazz' most important and creative improvisers.
Ichalote
Warne will probably continue to be a bit of an "unsung cat". But for all of that he is still one of the really good improvisational soloists.
Great insights into what may have contributed to his being "unsung".