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Author: J. Craig Jenkins,Esther E. Gottlieb
ISBN: 1412806593
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Pages 345 pages
Publisher Transaction Publishers; 1 edition (September 17, 2007)
Language English
Category: Other
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 587
ePUB size: 1728 kb
FB2 size: 1290 kb
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eBook Identity Conflicts: Can Violence be Regulated? download

by J. Craig Jenkins,Esther E. Gottlieb


E-kitap yazarı: J. Craig Jenkins, Esther E. Gottlieb. This volume examines the origins and regulation of violent identity conflicts

E-kitap yazarı: J. Bu kitabı bilgisayarınızda, Android, iOS cihazlarınızda Google Play Kitaplar uygulamasını kullanarak okuyun. Identity Conflicts: Can Violence be Regulated? adlı e-kitabı çevrimdışı okumak, okurken metni vurgulamak, yer işareti eklemek veya notlar almak için indirin. This volume examines the origins and regulation of violent identity conflicts. It focuses on the regulation of conflict: the constraining, directing, and repression of violence through institutional rules and understandings.

Identity Conflicts book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Identity Conflicts: Can Violence Be Regulated? as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Social conflicts are ubiquitous and inherent in organized social life.

JC Jenkins, EE Gottlieb. Identity Conflicts: Can Violence be Regulated?, 1, 2011. Conflict Carrying Capacity and the Early Warning of Civil Violence. JC Jenkins, CL Taylor. Introduction: The Study of Politics Enters the Twenty-First Century. Mershon Center for International Security Studies, 2004. Deprivation, Violence, and Identities: Mapping Contemporary World Conflicts. JC Jenkins, E Gottlieb, J Kukielka-Blaser, A Sikainga, F Spaulding,. Ohio State University. Mershon Center for International Security Studies, 2003.

Social conflicts are ubiquitous and inherent in organized social life

Social conflicts are ubiquitous and inherent in organized social life  . No commitment, cancel anytime.

Special Advisor for International Affairs and Associate Professor of Comparative and International Education.

Semantic Scholar extracted view of "Identity Conflicts: Can Violence be Regulated?" by Harris Chaiklin. oceedings{CC, title {Identity Conflicts: Can Violence be Regulated?}, author {Harris Chaiklin}, year {2008} }. Harris Chaiklin.

Jenkins, J. Craig and Esther E. Identity Conflicts and Their Regulation: An Introduction. Pp. 1–22 in J. C. Jenkins and E. Gottlieb, ed. Identity Conflicts: Can Violence be Regulated?

Jenkins, J. Identity Conflicts: Can Violence be Regulated? New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers. Johnston, Hank, Enrique Laraña, and Joseph Gusfield. Cite this chapter as: Almeida . 2010) Globalization and Collective Action. eds) Handbook of Politics. Springer, New York, NY.

Contents Acknowledgements Preface 1. Identity Conflicts and Their Regulation: An Introduction J. Craig Jenkins and Esther E. Gottlieb 2. Uncertain Connections: Globalization, Localization, Identities, and Violence. Guatemala Diane M. Nelson 5. Public Islam as an Antidote to Violence? Dale F. Eickelman and Armando Salvatore Part II. Suppressed 6. Cyber-Separatism, Islam, and the State in China Dru C. Gladney 7. Re-Evaluating the Kurdish Question Michael M. Gunter 8. The Buddhist Purification Movement in Post-Colonial South Korea: Restoring Clerical Celibacy and State Intervention Pori Park Part III.

Request PDF On Oct 3, 2003, J. Craig Jenkins and others published Deprivation, Violence, and Identities .

The representation of Generation . as prone to violence appears in conflict with their actual expression of identity; this generation of Somalis seems no more likely to engage in violent behaviour than the average Australian of the same age. However, when violence does occur, it is subject to much more scrutiny than when it takes place in a mainstream setting.

Social conflicts are ubiquitous and inherent in organized social life. This volume examines the origins and regulation of violent identity conflicts. It focuses on the regulation of conflict: the constraining, directing, and repression of violence through institutional rules and understandings. The core question the authors address is how violence is regulated and the social and political consequences of such regulation.

The contributors provide a multidisciplinary multi-regional analysis of identity conflicts and their regulation. The chapters focus on the forging and suppression of religious and ethnic identities, problematic national identities, the recreation of identity in post-conflict peace-building efforts, and the forging of collective identities in the process of democratic state building. The instances of violent conflict treated here range across the globe from Central and South America, to Asia, to the Balkans, and to the Islamic world.

One of the key findings is that conflicts involving religious, ethnic, or national identity are inherently more violence prone and require distinctive methods of regulation. Identity is a question both of power and of integrity. This means that both material and symbolic needs must be addressed in order to constrain or regulate these conflicts. Accordingly, some chapters draw on a political-economy approach that places primary emphasis on resources, organization, and interests, while others develop a cultural approach focusing on how identities are constructed, grievances defined, blame attributed, and redress articulated.

This volume offers new ideas about the regulation of identity conflicts, at both the global and local level, that engage both tradition and modernization. It will be of interest to policymakers, political scientists, human rights activists, historians, and anthropologists.