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eBook Launching into Cyberspace: Internet Development and Politics in Five World Regions (Ipolitics: Global Challenges in the Information Age) download
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Author: Marcus Franda
ISBN: 1588260127
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Pages 280 pages
Publisher Lynne Rienner Pub (October 1, 2001)
Language English
Category: Other
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 758
ePUB size: 1559 kb
FB2 size: 1532 kb
DJVU size: 1480 kb
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eBook Launching into Cyberspace: Internet Development and Politics in Five World Regions (Ipolitics: Global Challenges in the Information Age) download

by Marcus Franda


Internet development, local culture, and world politics

Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner, 2002. 295 pp. ISBN 1588260127. Launching into Cyberspace explores the impact of the Internet on international relations in. the twenty-first century through a comparative analysis of Internet development in five. regions of the world: Africa, the Middle East, Central/Eastern Europe, and Asia (India and. China as case studies). Internet development, local culture, and world politics. This book is the second in a three-volume series that evolved from Franda’s long-term.

Request PDF On Dec 1, 2002, Erik S. Herron and others published Launching Into Cyberspace: Internet Development and . When a particular form of technology materializes in the environs of a culture, it accomplishes far more than the obvious tasks associated with its function.

When a particular form of technology materializes in the environs of a culture, it accomplishes far more than the obvious tasks associated with its function. It modifies the user's world as well as the user. Cyberspace, culture and society are words that raise questions academics are called on to answer in a way that enables us to understand the reality of cyberspace and to explain it to our.

Launching Into Cyberspace book. Franda (government and politics, U. of Maryland) examines the extent to which Internet development has taken place in Africa, the Middle East, Asia, Eurasia, and Central and Eastern Europe. His focus is on the impact of the Internet on international relations.

Launching Into Cyberspace: Internet Development and Politics in Five World Regions. Launching Into Cyberspace: Internet Development and Politics in Five World Regions. Across the developing world, the information revolution is still an elite affair that governments face with deep ambivalence. This book would be even better served, however, by a sense of the underlying logic to these political struggles - and what they imply for the wider international system. More: Media Science & Technology.

iPolitics: Global Challenges in the Information Ag. The Middle East in the Global Internet Regime. Information Technology and Political Cultures in Eurasia.

iPolitics: Global Challenges in the Information Age. "This informative analysis explains how political considerations regulate the democratizing potential of online technologies. -Scott L. Althaus, Harvard International Journal of Press/Politics. Launching into Cyberspace explores the Internet as an increasingly important variable in the study of comparative politics and international relations. The Political Economy of the Internet in Eastern Europe. Internet Politics in the Former Soviet Union and Other Central/Eastern European States.

Launching into Cyberspace provides a comparative analysis of the impact of the Internet on international relations. to the next but often from country to country

Marcus Franda (Author). oUncategorisedl relations Technological innovations Internet oUncategorisedl relations Case studies.

Marcus Franda (Author).

In Internet Development and Politics in Five World Regions, he tackles one of the 21st . This book has too many fascinating conclusions to go into here.

In Internet Development and Politics in Five World Regions, he tackles one of the 21st century's biggest potential themes with his usual thoroughness and crystal-clarity. And, as usual, an incredible amount of vital information is packed into a relatively short space (some 243 pages). But Franda notes that "the twin inventions" of the Internet and World Wide Web more than anything else "seem destined to spread the information revolution throughout the world

Whether it’s turning promises on climate change into action, rebuilding trust in the financial system, or connecting the world to the internet, the World Economic Forum has singled out 10 key global challenges that, if they are to be addressed, require cooperation from the public and private.

Whether it’s turning promises on climate change into action, rebuilding trust in the financial system, or connecting the world to the internet, the World Economic Forum has singled out 10 key global challenges that, if they are to be addressed, require cooperation from the public and private sectors. Here is a guide to the 10 challenges, and why they matter to the world. Food security and why it matters. By 2050, the world must feed 9 billion people. Yet the demand for food will be 60% greater than it is today.

Launching into Cyberspace explores the Internet as an increasingly important variable in the study of comparative politics and international relations in diverse national settings. Focusing on Africa, the Middle East, Central and Eastern Europe, Eurasia, China, and India, Franda examines the extent to which Internet development has (or has not) taken place and the relationship between that development and the conduct of international relations. His case studies - incorporating an analysis of such wide-ranging variables as language and literacy, cultural values, political parties, leadership, and the availability of capital and technological expertise - also illuminate policy processes in differing political systems. Franda provides new insights into the diffusion of the international Internet regime from its original moorings in the U.S., western Europe, and Japan and, especially, to the understanding of Internet development as a major issue on the global policy agenda. Franda examines the extent to which Internet development has (or has not) taken place in a range of national settings, as well as the relationship between that development and the conduct of international relations. 4/01