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Author: Richard E. Flathman
ISBN: 080188215X
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Pages 232 pages
Publisher Johns Hopkins University Press; 1 edition (September 14, 2005)
Language English
Category: Other
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 799
ePUB size: 1817 kb
FB2 size: 1899 kb
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eBook Pluralism and Liberal Democracy download

by Richard E. Flathman


Pluralism and Liberal Democracy (2005).

Richard E. Flathman (August 6, 1934 – September 6, 2015) was the George Armstrong Kelly Professor of Political Science, Emeritus, at Johns Hopkins University. Pluralism and Liberal Democracy (2005). Perfectionism without Perfection: Cavell, Montaigne, and the Conditions of Morals and Politics," in Andrew Norris (e. The Claim to Community: Essays on Stanley Cavell and Political Philosophy (Stanford University Press, 2006).

In Pluralism and Liberal Democracy one of the country's most distinguished political theorists turns to the task of how best to explain, justify, and encourage the concept, practice, and of pluralism

In Pluralism and Liberal Democracy one of the country's most distinguished political theorists turns to the task of how best to explain, justify, and encourage the concept, practice, and of pluralism.

Pluralism and Liberal Democracy book.

Pluralism and Liberal Democracy. By Richard E. Flathman. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2005. During the past century, thinkers have explored pluralism under at least five different rubrics. Political pluralism emerged in Britain, and then migrated to America, as a reaction to doctrines of plenipotentiary state power.

In Pluralism and Liberal Democracy one of the country's most distinguished political theorists turns to the task of how best to explain, justify, and encourage the concept, practice, and of pluralism

In Pluralism and Liberal Democracy one of the country's most distinguished political theorists turns to the task of how best to explain, justify, and encourage the concept, practice, and of pluralism. Most recently, John Rawls has cited the fact of pluralism-the diversity characteristic of modern societies under circumstances of liberty-as a challenge that legitimate liberal societies must address. Export citation Request permission.

Liberal democracy is a liberal political ideology and a form of government in which representative democracy operates under the principles of classical liberalism.

In this book Richard E. Flathman argues vigorously for a new understanding of the proper place of voluntarism, individuality, and plurality in the political and moral theory of liberalism

In this book Richard E. Flathman argues vigorously for a new understanding of the proper place of voluntarism, individuality, and plurality in the political and moral theory of liberalism. Giving close and sympathetic attention to thinkers who are seldom considered in debates about liberalism, he draws upon thinking within and outside the liberal canon to articulate a refashioned liberalism that gives a more secure prominence to plurality and a robust individuality. Flathman focuses on political philosophers whose work deals with willfulness and the will in human practice.

In Pluralism and Liberal Democracy one of the country's most distinguished political theorists turns to the task of. .

In Pluralism and Liberal Democracy one of the country's most distinguished political theorists turns to the task of how best to explain, justify, and encourage the concept, practice, and of pluralism. Flathman finds that pluralism's relation to liberalism has been challenged by the recent emergence of pluralities widely thought to threaten states and societies-such as separatist and secessionist movements. The tension between the desire for unity and the embrace of diversity has created vigorous disagreement about the nature of pluralism and its relation to liberalism.

Anti-Pluralism moves seamlessly from the theory of democracy to concrete proposals for how to deal with the current .

Anti-Pluralism moves seamlessly from the theory of democracy to concrete proposals for how to deal with the current wave of populism that serves as an antidote to our current pessimism. but this one is unique in its combination of comprehensiveness, brevity, and wisdom. The author explains why populism is on the march in countries around the world.

In Pluralism and Liberal Democracy one of the country's most distinguished political theorists turns to the task of how best to explain, justify, and encourage the concept, practice, and institutionalization of pluralism. By examining and analyzing the accounts and explanations of four philosophers―William James, Hannah Arendt, Stuart Hampshire, and Michael Oakeshott―Richard E. Flathman augments the theories of pluralism most familiar to students and scholars of politics and political theory.

Flathman delves into a number of writings by and about these philosophers, weaving their philosophical theories into the ideology of liberalism. Among the works he studies are James's Some Problems of Philosophy, Arendt's The Origins of Totalitarianism, Hampshire's Freedom of Mind, and Oakeshott's On Human Conduct.

Flathman finds that pluralism's relation to liberalism has been challenged by the recent emergence of pluralities widely thought to threaten states and societies―such as separatist and secessionist movements. The tension between the desire for unity and the embrace of diversity has created vigorous disagreement about the nature of pluralism and its relation to liberalism. The philosophers studied here embrace these conflicts and challenges, further invigorating a political concept Flathman regards as a centerpiece of liberalism.

Dogrel
The book is the most effective tool I found to allow yourself to step outside of yourself and view the whole human species and yourself in a completely nonfiction way. What are people and why do they do the things they do? Who are you and why do you do the things you do? Who am I and why do I do the things I do? Three questions that are similar but different as you go from everyone to yourself.

The book is short but has high information density. That means it should be a quick read but will probably take longer to get through if you are not familiar with the ideas presented. The content of the book challenges many assumptions about how we exist and act in the world. I am not describing a work of philosophy but of hard-nosed, empirical research that the rational mind will generally fail to refute.

I do not think the author intended to write a book that clarifies the world as it is, but I see that as an outcome of the work. The main benefit of reading this book is you gain a description of the world of people that matches reality but with enough substance and interpretation to make that description useful. You have to try and suspend your judgments when reading this book to get the most use out of it.

I found the book powerful and credible. I give it 5 stars for 100% useful content throughout, accessible writing style, and for no apparent signs of bias. The writer does offer opinions and personal stories in some parts, but they are mostly of the humorous kind or blatant sarcasm. With that said, book does not try to qualify the behaviors described as either good or bad but more or less natural. The main theme is that there are plausible reasons for why people behave in certain ways that can be understood by examining biological ancestry. The case is made in an "intriguing" and "compelling" way in which you have to decide what to make of it. Despite its independent tone, there is a treasure of advice to be uncovered from this unassuming work.
Oreavi
We like to think of ourselves as “evolved”. We might be willing to grant that we are animals — after all, we have arms, legs — actually we have all the same organs, limbs, etc. as apes (make that “other apes”). But we really do want to insist we are somehow just a completely different kind of thing. After all, we are rational, we have culture, we watch tv, . . .

Books like this remind us that we really are animals, that our thoroughly rational self-image is a thin veneer over our animal selves. So much of our behavior mirrors the behaviors not only of apes but other more distant relatives, despite anything we may think about ourselves. We vie for the corner office just like apes vie with their fellow apes for grooming partners, sexual partners, the best food, the best nest location, . . . . We think our organizational structures, our decision processes, our workplace designs are all in the interests of business and efficiency. Maybe they are, but they are also those same bits of competition and hierarchy that we see in our cousins.

Conniff even cites the suggestion that language itself — one of the things we think strongly sets us apart — evolved as a substitute for grooming. Set aside for the moment pictures of language as statements of facts and think instead of ritualistic exchanges of “How are you?”, day to day gossip, “exchanges of pleasantries”. It’s easy then to see much of our linguistic behavior as establishing and maintaining communal and personal relationships, just as apes do in grooming.

There are other books on the topic, and Conniff cites a number of them, notably Frans de Waal’s classic Chimpanzee Politics. Conniff himself is not a scientist like de Waal, but he’s a rare cross of scientific, management, and journalistic experience. De Waal studies chimps, and for the most part he leaves the comparisons to us to make. Conniff speaks straightforwardly of human, mostly office behavior.

Conniff has put in his time in business and office environments. He starts there and works back from our behavior there to find our similarities and shared roots with other animals. In doing so, he’s not only bringing us closer to our animal relatives, but he’s also, again like de Waal, bringing them closer to us — he dispels the myths of the constantly bloodthirsty, violent animal and puts in its place a much more complex picture, containing compassion, cooperation, coordination, and, above all, community-building.

Much of the book, especially the first half, addresses hierarchy. Expressions of hierarchical relationships needn’t be large and explicit. They can be facial expressions, postures, positionings in a room — all of these things we can, if we take the time, observe in ourselves just as we can in apes. Hierarchy after all is what gives so much structure to community. Hierarchy gives us not only competition but stability — when we behave appropriately to our places, expressing dominance or submission, or just peer standing, we make it possible to carry on without friction.

In addition to hierarchy (subordination and dominance), Conniff discusses atlruism, intimidation, imitation, and deception, all in the context of commonalities with our animal relatives.

In reading the book, I found myself wanting not to engage in some of the behaviors Conniff describes, not to be driven by these biologically-rooted drives. But actually I think the healthier attitude is to embrace them, enjoying that biologically-driven part of us. After all, that’s what got us where we are today (both for the good and the bad). Sometimes hierarchy in particular is offensive or extreme, and it needs to be resisted. But try to do without it altogether. We’ll never not be animals.
Molace
Richard Conniff is an extraordinary writer. If you're a Malcolm Gladwell fan, as I am, and you participate, on any level, in the corporate world, then prepare to be delighted you treated yourself to this book. With dry wit and a density of research material (studies, anecdotes perfectly suited to the point), Conniff does to the working world what he did to the rarified social circles of the very rich: he examines his subject from the point of view of a naturalist's blind and then reports the behavior of these strangest of all animals, the human being.

Why is being a jerk a workable strategy for a company boss, and under what circumstances does that strategy break down? Why is it a bad idea to appear overly enthusiastic (waving at passers-by, etc.) in your new office? What makes one kind of corporate culture (Google, Pixar, etc.) work and another (Enron) toxic and implosive? All this can be understood by examining corporate culture through the eyes of a veteran naturalist.

I'd offer to loan you my copy of "Corner Office" and my other favorite of Conniff's books ("Natural History of the Rich"), but I'm afraid I'm going to keep mine close at hand. I'm going to be reading them again very soon.

From one monkey to another, you're gonna love this guy's work. You'll be so elevated by the writing you'll swing from the tree limbs, and then break one off, and then hit the ground with it so that all the other monkeys can see that you can break a really big branch (does any of this simian behavior strike you as somehow familiar?). Why Richard Conniff isn't yet a household name is, to me, a mystery which, given time, I'm sure he will explore in another hilariously insightful book, this time about the nature of celebrity.