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eBook Shifting Body Politics: Gender, Nation, State in Pakistan (Feminist Fine Print) download
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Author: Shahnaz Rouse
ISBN: 8188965030
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Pages 155 pages
Publisher Women Unlimited; 1st Edition edition (January 1, 2004)
Language English
Category: Other
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 325
ePUB size: 1880 kb
FB2 size: 1983 kb
DJVU size: 1425 kb
Other formats: mobi doc lit txt

eBook Shifting Body Politics: Gender, Nation, State in Pakistan (Feminist Fine Print) download

by Shahnaz Rouse


Shifting Body Politics book.

Shifting Body Politics book.

Includes the essays that explore the parameters of struggles over gender in Pakistan

Includes the essays that explore the parameters of struggles over gender in Pakistan. This title attempts to theoretically traverse the boundaries between public and private domains the State and what is often referred to as civil society the individual and the collective and the local and international.

Pakistan became highly visible to the West after September 11, 2001, through the many images in the media of women as veiled, submissive, and oppressed by Islam. Most analyses of women in Pakistan have failed to capture the complexity of historical, social, political, and regional factors that bear on gender relations.

Feminism in Pakistan is a set of movements aimed at defining, establishing, and defending equal political, economic, and social rights and equal opportunities for women in Pakistan. It is the pursuit of women's rights within the society of Pakistan.

Shahnaz Rouse, Shifting Body Politics: Gender, Nation, State in Pakistan (New Delhi: Women Unlimited, 2004), 111. It’s not a universal principle, but this representation of marriage is dominant and widespread in popular culture. Prem Chowdhry, Contentious Marriages, Eloping Couples: Gender, Caste, and Patriarchy in Northern India (Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2007), 2–10.

Author : Shahnaz Rouse. Publisher : Kali For Women (women Unlimited) Ritu Menon, Te. 6964947. The three essays in this volume explore the changing parameters of struggles over gender in Pakistan. In the process, the author attempts to theoretically traverse the boundaries between public and private domains, the State and what is often referred to as civil society, the individual and the collective, and the local and internaitonal.

Pakistani feminists like Shahnaz Rouse, a Sarah Lawrence College professor, and Farida Shaheed, a sociologist who heads the Shirkat Gah women’s resource center in Pakistan, have done vital work in the field o. .

Pakistani feminists like Shahnaz Rouse, a Sarah Lawrence College professor, and Farida Shaheed, a sociologist who heads the Shirkat Gah women’s resource center in Pakistan, have done vital work in the field of Pakistani gender identity and class analysis, while Fouzia Saeed has been instrumental in raising the issue of sexual harassment. By appealing to secular nationalism as well as Islamic modernism, it is not restrained by the need to base all thought in Islamic scripture, although secular feminists also use this powerful tool when necessary.

Shifting body politics. gender, nation, state in Pakistan. Published 2004 by Women Unlimited in New Delhi. Gender identity, Politics and government, Women in politics.

Examining a wide range of debates on gender-related issues in Pakistan, this book is a thought-provoking study of the ways in which the notion of the ‘ideal’ woman is imagined in and placed at the very core of nationalist and religious discourses, a phenomenon not limited, of course, to the Pakistani or even to the Muslim case.

The three essays in this volume explore the changing parameters of struggles over gender in Pakistan. In the process, the author attempts to theoretically traverse the boundaries between public and private domains, the State and what is often referred to as 'civil society', the individual and the collective, and the local and international. She does this through a discussion of sovereignty and citizenship; the growing nexus between militarism, masculinism and fundamentalism; and the rapid shrinking of democratic spaces in the country.