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eBook Heavy Drinking: The Myth of Alcoholism as a Disease download
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Author: Herbert Fingarette
ISBN: 0520067541
Subcategory: Medicine & Health Sciences
Pages 166 pages
Publisher University of California Press; 49547th edition (June 21, 1989)
Language English
Category: Other
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 833
ePUB size: 1571 kb
FB2 size: 1552 kb
DJVU size: 1193 kb
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eBook Heavy Drinking: The Myth of Alcoholism as a Disease download

by Herbert Fingarette


Herbert Fingarette, a distinguished professor at the University of California, has been a consultant on alcoholism and . Found this book very helpful in helping to understand how "The Disease Theory of Alcoholism" developed

Herbert Fingarette, a distinguished professor at the University of California, has been a consultant on alcoholism and addiction to the World Health Organization, and a Fellow of the Stanford Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences. His work has had a significant influence on the . Supreme Court, state supreme courts, and current national policy makers on substance abuse. Found this book very helpful in helping to understand how "The Disease Theory of Alcoholism" developed. The book also helps in understanding why so many of our treatment centers and the program of Alcoholics Anonymous have such low success rates.

Professor Fingarette’s book Heavy Drinking: The Myth of Alcoholism as a Disease was denounced by many academics and medical professionals but cited in a Supreme Court decision

Professor Fingarette’s book Heavy Drinking: The Myth of Alcoholism as a Disease was denounced by many academics and medical professionals but cited in a Supreme Court decision. In Heavy Drinking: The Myth of Alcoholism as a Disease (1988), Professor Fingarette all but accused the treatment industry of conspiring to profit from the conventional theory that alcoholism is a disease. He maintained that heavy use of alcohol is a way of life, that many heavy drinkers can choose to reduce their drinking to moderate levels, and that most definitions of the word alcoholic are phony.

University of California Press, 9 февр.

In about 140 pages Herbert Fingarette, formerly a professor of philosophy at UC Santa Barbara, dispels the myth that alcoholism is a disease, while taking very seriously the social problem of alcoholic behavior. Since its debut this book has been vilified by the current e paradigm as a sham, harmful to its readers & that it should be banned from all major book stores. It is simp Heavy Drinking is an important book; it is a brave book & simply makes sense.

PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books.

Contemporary philosophers such as Herbert Fingarette in Heavy Drinking: The Myth Of Alcoholism As A Disease, and recently, Piers Benn in ‘Can Addicts Help It?’ in Philosophy Now Issue 80, have also argued in support of such a model. In the Protagoras, Socrates discusses the nature of, and challenges to, self-mastery (ie self-control).

Herbert Fingarette presents constructive approaches to heavy drinking, including new methods of helping heavy drinkers and social policies for preventing heavy drinking and the harms associated with it. Więcej informacji.

In his 1988 book Heavy Drinking, Fingarette gainsays the disease theory of alcoholism popularized by groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous. Fingarette's arguments were famously employed by the . References. Being 97 (Aeon video of Herbert Fingarette pondering "the meaning of it all" in 2018, the year of his death).

Heavy Drinking informs the general public for the first time how recent research has discredited almost every widely held belief about alcoholism, including the very concept of alcoholism as a single disease with a unique cause. Herbert Fingarette presents constructive approaches to heavy drinking, including new methods of helping heavy drinkers and social policies for preventing heavy drinking and the harms associated with it.
Gavigamand
after a year of sobriety, including two months of AA meetings in the beginning of that year.

When it was time to drink again, I found his book and read it, and quoted it to my wife to get her to agree to let me drink again, though only beer and wine, of course.

Fingarette is correct: there are very heavy drinkers who are NOT alcoholics. They just drink a lot. If they stop drinking, or cut down, drink-related problems go away.

But if you are a real alcoholic, alcohol is not your problem. If alcohol is your problem, you are not an alcoholic.

I've given it a lot of thought in the 15 years since I made it back (almost didn't) to the sober world.
Browelali
I think, Mr. Fingarette has as much authority to write on a subject of alcoholism, as he has on subjects of cancer, schizophrenia, or multiple sclerosis. It is remarkable that most books about alocoholism, written by professionals with doctoral degrees in clinical psychology, or medicine, enequivocally explain and support the scientific approach to achoholism as a disease, and as subject of psychiatry. And the medieval idea that alcoholism is a flaw of character, controllable by the power of will is, as always has been, proclaimed by the vocal laymen like Mr. Fingarette.
All major and most authoritative medical resources, such as American Medical Association and American Society of Addiction Medicine define alcoholism as a disease which is independent of and uncontrollable by human will and effort.
To the contrary, many laywriters and self-proclaimed experts of the human psyche attempt to trash the minds of their readers with false, couterscientific and socially dangerous ideas, which have already put staggering numbers (exceeding one hundred thousand by some sources) of mental patients behind prison bars, making the USA a focus of critique and condemnation of many human right organizations, such as our very own, US (NYC)-based Amnesty International <[...]
BTW, I have read Mr. Fingarette's book thoroughly and could find not even a single truly scientific evidence supporting his populist, but badly amatorish philosophy.
Better get this outstanding, easy-to-read, yet written by professionals book on alcoholism: Beyond the Influence : Understanding and Defeating Alcoholism by Katherine Ketcham, et al., available on amazon.com
Haralem
In 7 chapters, Herbert Fingarette, formerly a professor of philosophy at UC Santa Barbara, dispels the myth that alcoholism is a disease, while taking very seriously the social problem of alcoholic behavior.
In 1960 E. M. Jellinek published a book titled THE DISEASE CONCEPT OF ALCOHOLISM (p. 20). Alcoholics Anonymous members adopted this book as their scientific basis for asserting that alcoholism is a disease. But Jellinek's data was compiled by interviewing A.A. members. Thus, his conclusions were based on the reasoning of the very people who came to endorse his book. Furthermore, his research was based on only 98 interviews.
Today, the politics of alcoholism is big business (pp. 22 ff.). Conceiving of it as a disease enables treatment centers to receive payments from health insurance companies.
If somebody has cancer, you don't say, "You foolish person! You have cancer!" But when it comes to alcoholism, it is not unusual to find the relapsing drinker to be accused of having done something wrong. Many think the alcoholic, unlike the "canceric," has control. This, Fingarette argues, is in an important sense true, and shows the disanalogy between the disease of cancer and the PROBLEM of alcoholism. (Have you ever noticed that "alcoholic" is the dominant "-ic" in the U.S.? If you examine the word "alcohol," what is added to it is only "-ic." But when a person has a fancy for, say, chocolate, we don't say, "chocolatic," but rather "chocoholic." "Holic" always makes its way in, so obsessed are we as a society with alcohol.)
Heavy drinkers -- as Fingarette refers to what others call "alcoholics" -- do not become heavy drinkers for just one reason. Therefore, it is unclear that treatment should consist of just one variety. Twelve-step programs, in our society, play a role like that of various forms of fundamentalism both here and abroad, reducing problems to a formulaic response that is often insulting at best, and deadly at worst. The person is by-passed because the program directors "know" what the right thing is for the "patient" to do.
Controlled drinking programs are available in many countries (p. 128). In Europe, attitudes toward drinking are remarkably different from attitudes in the U.S., and these differences often make a difference in the way people actually drink. Stigmatizing behavior often reinforces the very negative behavior it seeks to prevent, especially in a country like the U.S. where rebellion is schizophrenically considered a virtue.
Fingarette discusses the GENETIC HYPOTHESIS on pp. 51-55. This is very important: IT HAS NOT BEEN PROVED. I have spoken with several substance abuse counselors who very nonchalantly remark, as though possessing conclusive scientific authority to do so, "It's genetic." We don't know that. We don't know that 12 steps to recovery is the gospel. Agents of recovery should consider adopting a more epistemically modest stance. But although this book would help them make a move in that direction, they can't afford to. Literally.
Wiliniett
The claims in this book are preposterous. The author did not bother to site any research through scientific agencies such as NIDA or SAMHSA which unequevically state that alcoholism is a biological, social, and spiritual disease caused by the indisputable evidence of physiological changes in the nucleus accumbens. This is a garbage book full of junk science, ameteur psychology, and an incredible amount of biased attitude.