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eBook Cochlear Implants: A Handbook download
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Author: Bonnie Tucker
ISBN: 0786405341
Subcategory: Medicine & Health Sciences
Pages 205 pages
Publisher McFarland Publishing; 1 edition (September 1, 1998)
Language English
Category: Other
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 509
ePUB size: 1663 kb
FB2 size: 1988 kb
DJVU size: 1820 kb
Other formats: mbr mobi docx rtf

eBook Cochlear Implants: A Handbook download

by Bonnie Tucker


Cochlear Implants book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Cochlear Implants: A Handbook as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Cochlear Implants book. The fascinating technology of cochlear implants continues to change the.

Cochlear Implants : A Handbook. Bonnie Poitras Tucker. Walmart 9780786445141.

Cochlear Implants: A Handbook. by Bonnie Poitras Tucker (Author). Bonnie Poitras Tucker, deaf since infancy and unable to wear hearing aids, received a cochlear implant in 1991. ISBN-13: 978-0786445141. An attorney and professor of law at Arizona State University, she is the author of six books and over 100 articles, and has been on television's Nightline and Good Morning America Sunday. important" -Newswaves. important" -Hearing Loss. From the Inside Flap.

A cochlear implant (CI) is a surgically implanted neuroprosthetic device to provide a person with moderate to profound sensorineural hearing loss a modified sense of sound

A cochlear implant (CI) is a surgically implanted neuroprosthetic device to provide a person with moderate to profound sensorineural hearing loss a modified sense of sound. CI bypasses the normal acoustic hearing process to replace it with electric signals which directly stimulate the auditory nerve. A person with a cochlear implant receiving intensive auditory training may learn to interpret those signals as sound and speech

Chapter 11 Utility of electrically evoked potentials in cochlear implant users.

Chapters written by implant users and their parents give fascinating insight into the experience of hearing again with a cochlear implant. Chapter 11 Utility of electrically evoked potentials in cochlear implant users.

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Tucker has written extensively on deafness from both personal and legal perspectives

Tucker has written extensively on deafness from both personal and legal perspectives. In Deaf Culture, Cochlear Implants, and Elective Disability, Tucker writes, According to the leaders of the National Association of the Deaf (NAD), Deaf people like being Deaf, want to be Deaf, and are proud of their Deafnes. hey claim the right to ‘personal diversity,’ which is ‘something to be cherished rather than fixed and erased.

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Medical Equipment Supplier.

The fascinating technology of cochlear implants continues to change the lives of children and adults with severe or profound hearing loss. This book explains, in a simple and accessible style, the manner in which cochlear implants work, for whom they work, and the extent to which they help deaf people hear. The author tells the story of her own experience with the implant procedure, along with its advantages and benefits. The book contains a comprehensive yet simple explanation of the basic concept, history, and evolution of cochlear implants. It includes questionnaire responses and summaries, case studies, and general information-all provided by some of the foremost clinicians in the field-that provide a full picture of how implant recipients and their families feel about the procedure. Readers will come away from this unique book thoroughly informed about the ability of cochlear implants to reduce or eradicate the ramifications of deafness.
The Sphinx of Driz
although this is an older interpretation of the now newer cochlear systems available it is relevant to my implant in 2009
Steelrunner
Since this review is 14 years after this book is written, the information on some issues have changed such as the complaints on the chords and heavy processors. CIs nowadays are behind the ear and look a lot like regular hearing aids except for the obvious magnet that stays the same.

Ms. Tucker did a good job in collecting information as well as sharing her own experience. I find it seriously frustrating that in the chapter on Deaf culture that she goes on about some Deaf believing hearing parents should hand over their deaf children to the Deaf to raise and goes on to state that parenting must be left to the parent's choice of how to raise their children, when in fact, the opposite is happening. Deaf parents and hearing parents alike are having their rights to parenting taken away by courts if they refuse to force CIs on their children. There are several cases in the USA that have happened in the last few years.

I have seen a change in the way Deaf proponents see things now. I think that if we in hearing culture would accept ASL or any of the many signed languages as being of value instead of seeing it as detrimental, we would see an acceptance of CIs. ALL my hearing children signed before they talked or were oral and I see it as making them all way more perceptive and smarter. My own grandchild who is deaf signed first and it has not slowed down the ability to talk one bit. It is sad though to think that to hear is of more value to a child than to be around their deaf parent that uses sign language.