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Author: Trisha Greenhalgh
ISBN: 0727915789
Subcategory: Medicine & Health Sciences
Pages 240 pages
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group; 2 edition (November 1, 2000)
Language English
Category: Other
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 658
ePUB size: 1663 kb
FB2 size: 1587 kb
DJVU size: 1596 kb
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eBook How to Read a Paper download

by Trisha Greenhalgh


How to Read a Paper is a standard text for medical and nursing schools as well as a friendly guide for everyone wanting to teach or. .

How to Read a Paper is a standard text for medical and nursing schools as well as a friendly guide for everyone wanting to teach or learn the basics of evidence-based medicine. Dr. Greenhalgh might seem to agree about the pragmatism, but the part about measurable impact is not on the agenda here at all. Her presentation is about total failures, easily detected via checklists. One recurrent motif is to conflate mistaken design practices (malpractice?) that may have been published in the past but automatically get manuscripts rejected today.

How to read a paper, by Trisha Greenhalgh. Content uploaded by Dixon Thomas.

Read Online How to Read a Paper: The Basics of Evidence-based Medicine and Healthcare ebook by Trisha Greenhalgh. Download How to Read a Paper Trisha Greenhalgh kindle book download. Find out How to Read a Paper Trisha Greenhalgh PDF download. Get How to Read a Paper Trisha Greenhalgh zip download. Bestseller How to Read a Paper: The Basics of Evidence-based Medicine and Healthcare MOBI, AZN format iphone. How to Read a Paper: The Basics of Evidence-based Medicine and Healthcare full book. com/pdf?id 111948474X.

How to read the paper-getting your bearings Summary. 0Pages: 2year: 17/18. 0. How to Read a Paper. 0Pages: 3year: 16/17. How to Read a Paper 2. 0Pages: 3year: 17/18.

John Wiley & Sons, 26 февр. An ideal introduction to evidence-based medicine, How to Read a Paper explains what to look for in different types of papers and how best to evaluate the literature and then implement the findings in an evidence-based, patient-centred way. Helpful checklist summaries of the key points in each chapter provide a useful framework for applying the principles of evidence-based medicine in everyday practice.

The book provides the tools to find and evaluate the literature, and implement the findings in an evidence-based, patient-centered way. Written for anyone in the health care professions who has little or no knowledge of evidence-based medicine, it provides a clear understanding of the concepts and how to put them into practice at the basic, clinical level.

How to Read a Paper book. BMJ Books) Royal Free and Univ.

How to Read a Paper is one of the bestselling texts on evidence-based medicine, used by health care professionals and medical students worldwide

How to Read a Paper is one of the bestselling texts on evidence-based medicine, used by health care professionals and medical students worldwide.

Assessment: The strength of this book lies in its sensible description of each topic. Persons with no prior knowledge will easily develop a sound understanding of evidence-based practice techniques.

In this lucid, readable book Trisha Greenhalgh provides the basics of evidence based medicine: how to find a medical research paper, assess it for its scientific validity, and where relevant, put the findings into practice. Written for anyone, medically qualified or not, who wishes to understand and apply evidence based medicine, How to Read a Paper makes seemingly obscure concepts clear and relevant, using practical examples and considering all the main types of research paper. This book is a comprehensive introduction to the usefulness and potential applications of evidence based medicine in the clinical setting.
ARE
I am disappointed. I am a statistician and non-MD epidemiologist actively engaged in research and the training of clinical and non-clinical users of research. The author of this book, a senior British MD, certainly knows her way around the arena of research publishing. The overall presentation is old-school and bleak, focusing on the myriad of errors and biases that make particular research projects "useless" much more than on the continuing efforts of experts in research design to systematize good practice. In fact, many "biases" in today's research practice are explicit, pragmatic choices whose effects are a matter of measurable degree. Dr. Greenhalgh might seem to agree about the pragmatism, but the part about measurable impact is not on the agenda here at all. Her presentation is about total failures, easily detected via checklists. One recurrent motif is to conflate mistaken design practices (malpractice?) that may have been published in the past but automatically get manuscripts rejected today. Surely the quality of published research has improved over time. Since Madame Curie? Since Jeckyl and Hyde? Galen?

My reading of the chapters covering topics about which I am most expert is that the advice on offer is not helpful or up-to-date. On questionnaire-based research, we are told that response rates under 70% are unacceptable-- a binary, blanket treatment of a continuous quality and cost measure. Further, we are instructed that questionnaire items requiring retrospection or honesty from respondents are "invalid"-- again a binary treatment of a subject that has fostered much innovation. On sample size and power, an initially smart dissection of the issue degenerates into tricky locutions without much helpful elaboration. How many variants of the intervention are to be included? How many subpopulations deserve separate analysis? Is a bigger sample always better? That's what I deal with routinely as a researcher, but I don't see it here.

A book like this is very much needed. But the premise of this book is that medical practitioners need a primer, written by a trusted insider, that will make them more informed participants in evidence-based medicine (EBM). All well and good. Such a book cannot, however, turn a practitioner untrained in research into a journal editor-- but it surely feeds that hope in any reader. A much shorter book could have served to make EBM consumers sufficiently wary of the challenges of research. As an educator I cannot conceive how to overcome this book's tone while teaching medical residents, for example, to assess research for their own practice or to participate in research at their institutions.
Prinna
Lots of good information and a great read for people who need to know how to read research papers correctly. I have issues with the number of parenthesis and the number of sentences contained in a single parenthesis, it makes for very confusing reading. Additionally the book tends to repeat itself frequently, making for long and tedious chapters.
INvait
Had to have this for school. I still can't believe I paid $47 for this book. Did not care for her style of writing- too wordy. Too much money.
Grotilar
The quintessential introduction to understanding how clinical trials actually work, and deciphering the meaning and implications of their findings. A must-have.
Wenes
Easy read and helps provide useful information to discriminate between good and bad studies.
Goltigor
A very good book on the topic evidence based medicine. Easy to read and understand. Contains lots of useful references. Unfortunately in the Kindle edition of mine the page numbering is missing in the index.
Boyn
Material that is kinda obvious
This book is an excellent, easy to read guide for anyone who needs a better understanding of research studies, and how to evaluate their applicability and reliability. It is perfect for nursing, psychology, and allied health research courses.

This book is a compilation of ten articles the author wrote for the British Journal of Medicine (BMJ). If you look online you can find the individual articles scattered here and there and at one point I even found all the articles (essentially this book) as an ebook available for free download.

I refer to this book time and time again when I need a refresher on the various aspects of research and also to verify that I hit on all the points when evaluating a study.

Great book, very user friendly.