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Author: Hung Wu
ISBN: 0804715297
Subcategory: Humanities
Pages 428 pages
Publisher Stanford University Press; Revised ed. edition (October 1, 1989)
Language English
Category: Other
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 928
ePUB size: 1129 kb
FB2 size: 1114 kb
DJVU size: 1969 kb
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eBook The Wu Liang Shrine: The Ideology of Early Chinese Pictorial Art download

by Hung Wu


Wu, Liang, 78-151 - Tomb, Bas-relief - China - Chia-hsiang hsien, Sepulchral monuments - China - Chia-hsiang hsien, Stone carving - China - History - Chʻin-Han dynasties, 221 . 220 ., Stone carving - China - Chia-hsiang hsien.

Wu, Liang, 78-151 - Tomb, Bas-relief - China - Chia-hsiang hsien, Sepulchral monuments - China - Chia-hsiang hsien, Stone carving - China - History - Chʻin-Han dynasties, 221 .

The funerary shrine of the Confucian scholar Wu Liang, created in AD 151, is the most important surviving pre-Buddhist monument .

The funerary shrine of the Confucian scholar Wu Liang, created in AD 151, is the most important surviving pre-Buddhist monument in China. That is to say, it is the most important single work of visual art from the centuries that set the patterns of Chinese thought for almost two millennia. The importance of the shrine lies in the beauty of the stone reliefs on its walls and, especially, in the remarkably comprehensive iconography of its nearly one hundred scenes. They constitute, in effect, a coherent symbolic structure of the universe as the Han Chinese conceived it.

Wu Hung does a superb job analyzing the Wu Liang Shrine

Wu Hung does a superb job analyzing the Wu Liang Shrine. His comprehensive narrative is written in a highly readable style, with excellent discussions of the history of the site, the interpretation of the bas-reliefs, and the philosophy of the age. Wu's personal conclusions are debatable, but valid within the framework of his thesis. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in Han cosmology, architecture, or social history.

Book, Online - Google Books. 2. A historiography of the study of the Wu family shrines. Part II. The Wu Liang Shrine Carvings: A Pictorial Universe: 3. The ceiling: heavenly omens. 4. The gables: the world of immortality. 5. The walls: human history. Epilogue: the ideology of the Wu Liang shrine carvings.

The Wu Liang Shrine book. The importance of the shrine lies in the beauty of the stone reliefs on its walls an The funerary shrine of the Confucian scholar Wu Liang, created in AD 151, is the most important surviving pre-Buddhist monument in China.

Riccardo Fracasso, Wu Hung. Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient, January 1993, JSTOR. The authors haven't yet claimed this publication.

5. The walls: human history- Epilogue: the ideology of the Wu Liang shrine carvings- Appendixes- Reference matter.

The Wu Liang Shrine Carvings: A Pictorial Universe: 3. The ceiling: heavenly omens-. The gables: the world of immortality-. source: Nielsen Book Data). The funerary shrine of the Confucian scholar Wu Liang, created in AD 151, is the most important surviving pre-Buddhist monument in China.

See Geng, Rong, Han Wu Liang ci huaxiang lu 漢武梁祠畫像錄 (Beijing: Archaeological Society of Beijing, 1936); Fairbank, Wilma, The Offering Shrines of'Wu Liang Tz'u’, reprinted in Adventures in Retrieval, Harvard-Yenching Institute Studies, 28 (Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press, 1972), 85; Toshio, Nagahiro, A Study on the Central Pavilion Scenes of the Wu Family Shrines, trans.

The funerary shrine of the Confucian scholar Wu Liang, created in AD 151, is the most important surviving pre-Buddhist monument in China. That is to say, it is the most important single work of visual art from the centuries that set the patterns of Chinese thought for almost two millennia. The importance of the shrine lies in the beauty of the stone reliefs on its walls and, especially, in the remarkably comprehensive iconography of its nearly one hundred scenes. They constitute, in effect, a coherent symbolic structure of the universe as the Han Chinese conceived it. This structure consists of three sections: the ceiling carvings present the Mandate of Heaven; the scenes on the two gables depict the paradise of the immortals; and the 44 stories related on the walls illustrate the history of mankind, starting with the creators of human culture and ending with a portrait of Wu Liang, who designed his own memorial. The author finds the shrine comparable, in the comprehensiveness and cultural significance of its iconography, to the cathedral at Chartres or the Sistine Chapel.
fr0mTheSkY
Wu Hung does a superb job analyzing the Wu Liang Shrine. His comprehensive narrative is written in a highly readable style, with excellent discussions of the history of the site, the interpretation of the bas-reliefs, and the philosophy of the age. Wu's personal conclusions are debatable, but valid within the framework of his thesis. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in Han cosmology, architecture, or social history.
Perongafa
I found this book very difficult to read. It's laid out with an emphasis on words and cartouches, and the presentation of the imagery is extremely confusing. I work in modern visual narratives and got this book to fully see the stories on the slabs; instead, this is, unfortunately, exactly what the title says it is: an analysis of the ideology of the pictures' subject material, rather than a book using the pictures themselves as a narrative form. This is painfully typical of academic studies of anything involving pictorial narratives: these folks just can't use imagery on its own, but bury any meaning and iconography under piles of wordy exposition and literature-based knowledge structure. I got through it, but it's not a good book; if there was a better one I'd own that, but this is really the only one out there, so... I'd say, 'don't bother', or 'don't waste your time and money', but since this book is pretty much all there is on the subject, and does actually manage to present the images (in a really fragmented and ignorant way), we're stuck with it.