» » Heroes of the Age: Moral Fault Lines on the Afghan Frontier (Comparative Studies on Muslim Societies)
eBook Heroes of the Age: Moral Fault Lines on the Afghan Frontier (Comparative Studies on Muslim Societies) download
Other
Author: David B. Edwards
ISBN: 0520200632
Subcategory: Humanities
Pages 334 pages
Publisher University of California Press (November 1, 1996)
Language English
Category: Other
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 450
ePUB size: 1605 kb
FB2 size: 1662 kb
DJVU size: 1471 kb
Other formats: lrf lrf mbr rtf

eBook Heroes of the Age: Moral Fault Lines on the Afghan Frontier (Comparative Studies on Muslim Societies) download

by David B. Edwards


Start reading Heroes of the Age on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App. Important information.

Series: Comparative Studies on Muslim Societies (Book 21). Paperback: 334 pages. ISBN-13: 978-0520200647. Product Dimensions: . x . inches. Start reading Heroes of the Age on your Kindle in under a minute.

Heroes of the Age: Moral Fault Lines on the Afghan Frontier (Comparative Studies on Muslim Societies). Download (pdf, . 8 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

On July 20, we had the largest server crash in the last 2 years. Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 8. 2% restored. Главная Heroes of the Age: Moral Fault Lines on the Afghan Frontier (Comparative Studies on Muslim Societies).

Much of the political turmoil that has occurred in Afghanistan since the Marxist revolution of 1978 has been attributed to the dispute between Soviet-aligned Marxists and the religious extremists inspired by Egyptian and Pakistani brands of "fundamentalist" Islam.

Berkeley: University of California Press, 1996. Before Taliban: Genealogies of the Afghan Jihad. David B. Edwards March 2017 · China. 307 p. maps, notes, glossary, bibliography, index. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002. ix. 354 p. illustrations, photographs, notes, glossary, bibliography, index. The Nan-chao Kingdom and T'ang China's Southwestern Frontier. November 1983 · The Journal of Asian Studies March 2017 · China Information.

Series: Comparative Studies on Muslim Societies. Published by: University of California Press. Much of the political turmoil that has occurred in Afghanistan since the Marxist revolution of 1978 has been attributed to the dispute between Soviet-aligned Marxists and the religious extremists inspired by Egyptian and Pakistani brands of "fundamentalist" Islam.

Heroes of the Age Moral Fault Lines on the Afghan Frontier. by David B. Edwards (Author). Comparative Studies on Muslim Societies.

Heroes of the Age: Moral Fault Lines on the Afghan Frontier. In a significant departure from this view, David B. Edwards contends that-though Marxism and radical Islam have undoubtedly played a significant role in the 's troubles derive less from foreign forces and the ideological divisions between groups than they do from the moral incoherence of Afghanistan itself. Seeking the historical and cultural roots of the conflict, Edwards examines the lives of three significant figures of the late nineteenth century-a tribal khan, a Muslim saint, and a prince who became king of the newly created state.

Recommend this journal. Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society.

Heroes of the Age book. I like the anthropological study and I would recommend reading it at least for that. Jun 27, 2019 Akul Diddi rated it liked it. The best book on Afghan frontier is still by Thomas barfield which focuses on the swiss cheese model theory. This one by Edward's is a one time read. It's okay okay to be precise as a book.

Much of the political turmoil that has occurred in Afghanistan since the Marxist revolution of 1978 has been attributed to the dispute between Soviet-aligned Marxists and the religious extremists inspired by Egyptian and Pakistani brands of "fundamentalist" Islam. In a significant departure from this view, David B. Edwards contends that—though Marxism and radical Islam have undoubtedly played a significant role in the conflict—Afghanistan's troubles derive less from foreign forces and the ideological divisions between groups than they do from the moral incoherence of Afghanistan itself. Seeking the historical and cultural roots of the conflict, Edwards examines the lives of three significant figures of the late nineteenth century—a tribal khan, a Muslim saint, and a prince who became king of the newly created state. He explores the ambiguities and contradictions of these lives and the stories that surround them, arguing that conflicting values within an artificially-created state are at the root of Afghanistan's current instability.Building on this foundation, Edwards examines conflicting narratives of a tribal uprising against the British Raj that broke out in the summer of 1897. Through an analysis of both colonial and native accounts, Edwards investigates the saint's role in this conflict, his relationship to the Afghan state and the tribal groups that followed him, and the larger issue of how Islam traditionally functions as an encompassing framework of political association in frontier society.