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Author: Vivian Bickford-Smith
ISBN: 0521472032
Subcategory: Humanities
Pages 310 pages
Publisher Cambridge University Press (March 31, 1995)
Language English
Category: Other
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 429
ePUB size: 1103 kb
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eBook Ethnic Pride and Racial Prejudice in Victorian Cape Town (African Studies) download

by Vivian Bickford-Smith


Vivian Bickford-Smith rightly points out that, although these papers are .

Vivian Bickford-Smith rightly points out that, although these papers are critical to the analysis of urban segregation, especially in Cape Town, there is nevertheless a lack of cohesion. There is therefore a need for a monograph to draw all these threads together. This current book attempts to do just that. The major weakness in this study, I find, lies in the concluding chapters which break away from the chronological thread and appear to lose some focus.

This original contribution to South African urban history draws on comparative material from other colonial port towns and on relevant studies of the Victorian city.

Longstanding British influence was thought to mitigate the racism of the Dutch settlers and foster the development of a sophisticated and colour-blind English merchant class. This original contribution to South African urban history draws on comparative material from other colonial port towns and on relevant studies of the Victorian city.

Vivian Bickford-Smith. Cape Town, Cape Town (South Africa), South Africa. There's no description for this book yet. Ethnic pride and racial prejudice in Victorian Cape Town. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Ethnic pride and racial prejudice in Victorian Cape Town from your list? Ethnic pride and racial prejudice in Victorian Cape Town. group identity and social practice, 1875-1902. by Vivian Bickford-Smith. Published 1995 by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge, New York. Includes bibliographical references (p. 255-271) and index. African studies series ;, 81.

Vivian Bickford-Smith is a professor in the Department of Historical Studies at the University of Cape Town. He is the author of Ethnic Pride and Racial Prejudice in Victorian Cape Town. Richard Mendelsohn is the head of the Department of Historical Studies at the University of Cape Town.

Volume 38 Issue 2. Race in cape town. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995. The Journal of African History.

Vivian Bickford-Smith of University of Cape Town, Cape Town (UCT) Read 37. .South African urban history, racial segregation and the unique case of Cape Town? Article. Vivian Bickford-Smith

Vivian Bickford-Smith of University of Cape Town, Cape Town (UCT) Read 37 publications Contact Vivian Bickford-Smith. Ethnic Pride and Racial Prejudice in Victorian Cape Town: Group Identity and Social Practice, 1875-1902. Vivian Bickford-Smith. Cape Town has enjoyed an academic and popular reputation for being the most relaxed of South African cities in terms of ‘race’ relations. Part of this reputation is based on the belief that there was much less segregation in Cape Town than elsewhere in southern Africa before Apartheid.

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Bickford-Smith, Vivian. African studies series ; 81. Summary. Ethnic pride and racial prejudice in Victorian Cape Town : group identity and social practice, 1875-1902. Vivian Bickford-Smith skilfully interweaves political, economic and social analysis to show that the English merchant class, far from being liberal, were generally as racist as Afrikaner farmers.

Ethnic pride and racial prejudice in Victorian Cape Town more. Publication Name: Studies in the History of Cape Town. Commerce, class and ethnicity: Cape Town at the advent of the mineral revolution (. 875) more. MINERAL REVOLUTION (. 875). Focusing on South Africa’s three main cities – Johannesburg, Cape Town and Durban – this book explores South African urban history from the late nineteenth century onwards more.

Nineteenth-century Cape Town, the capital of the British Cape Colony, was conventionally regarded as a liberal oasis in an otherwise racist South Africa. Longstanding British influence was thought to mitigate the racism of the Dutch settlers and foster the development of a sophisticated and colour-blind English merchant class. Vivian Bickford-Smith skilfully interweaves political, economic and social analysis to show that the English merchant class, far from being liberal, were generally as racist as Afrikaner farmers. Theirs was, however, a peculiarly English discourse of race, mobilised around a 'Clean Party' obsessed with sanitation and the dangers posed by 'un-English' Capetonians in a period of rapid urbanisation brought about by the discovery of diamonds and gold in the interior. This original contribution to South African urban history draws on comparative material from other colonial port towns and on relevant studies of the Victorian city.