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eBook Summer download
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Author: Edith Wharton
ISBN: 1420925210
Subcategory: Humanities
Pages 100 pages
Publisher Digireads.com (January 1, 2005)
Language English
Category: Other
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 547
ePUB size: 1116 kb
FB2 size: 1767 kb
DJVU size: 1151 kb
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eBook Summer download

by Edith Wharton


He laid down the book he had been wiping, and stoodconsidering her in silence. She wondered if Miss Hatchard had senthim round to pry into the way the library was looked after, and thesuspicion increased her resentment

He laid down the book he had been wiping, and stoodconsidering her in silence. She wondered if Miss Hatchard had senthim round to pry into the way the library was looked after, and thesuspicion increased her resentment. I saw you going into her house justnow, didn't I?" she asked, with the New England avoidance of the propername.

SUMMER is one of the best books Wharton ever wrote. Wharton had a pretty jaded view of the options women faced, and "Summer" is consistent with the bleak vision she first articulated in "The House of Mirth. Thumbs up on character development, irony, plot, dialogue, etc. Great read. It's only a few bucks more and will give you added perspective on the book and Wharton.

Wharton drew upon her insider's knowledge of the upper class New York "aristocracy" to realistically portray the lives and morals of the Gilded Age. She was the first woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for Literature in 1921. She was inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame in 1996. There are passages in "Summer" to die for. Her descriptions of the New England countryside ripening into summer alongside her evocations of young Charity's blossoming sexuality are beautifully written.

A new Englander of humble origins, Charity Royall is swept into a torrid love affair with an artistically inclined young man from New York City, but her dreams of a future with him are thwarted. I loved this book so much more than I thought I would! It has all of the compelling romance and drama that one would expect from a short novella about the sexual coming-of-age of a young woman in a small New England town and, admittedly, that's what kept me turning the pages. Jenny Blounts, goodreads. Результаты поиска по книге.

the introduction blabs on and on about its eroticism, and how scandalous it is. so i have devised a little drinking game

the introduction blabs on and on about its eroticism, and how scandalous it is. so i have devised a little drinking game.

Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "SUMMER" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. She wrote novels of manners about the old New York society from which she came, but her attitude was consistently critical. Her irony and her satiric touches, as well as her insight into human character, continue to appeal to readers today.

She had two brothers, Frederic Rhinelander and Henry Edward.

Wharton broke the conventions of woman's romantic fiction by making Charity a thoroughly contemporary woman-in .

When World War I ended in 1918 she abandoned the fashionable urban address for the delights of the country at the Pavillon Colombe in nearby êt. Wharton was a commited supporter of French imperialism, describing herself as a "rabid imperialist".

"Summer" is the story of the sexual awakening of the young woman, Charity Royall. Charity, the daughter of mountain moonshiners, is adopted by a poor New England family and falls for Lucius Harney, an educated young man from the city. "Summer" is the story of a young girl coming to terms with her feelings and sexuality in an environment of overwhelming social pressure in early 20th century America.
Andromakus
This story took place in the 1800's. The social rules that were in place at that time were covered very well and even though, they were very strict, they were not enough to control Charity Royal. She had been rescued from a group of backward mountain people as a child by Mr. Royal, the town lawyer. Growing up in his home she took his parenting for granted and was very rebellious. She fell in love with a young male visitor who took advantage of her. She became pregnant and her plan was to return to her family in the mountains. It is a story of love and disappointment and forgiveness. It is also told with such description that you feel the place and time come to life.
Larosa
I'm on the side of those reviewers who think this is one of Wharton's best. That it's a short novel does not diminish its skillfulness or impact. In fact, its concision is its great strength, and I think Wharton, who was a diligent editor of her own works, recognized that.

Other reviewers have revealed most of the story, which is unfortunate because its plot twists are best appreciated by first-time readers unaware of where the story goes and how it is resolved. (The first time I read it, I actually gasped aloud at several points.) I'd rather say something about its language and tone.

Nobody writes sentences with the clarity and precision of Edith Wharton. There are passages in "Summer" to die for. Her descriptions of the New England countryside ripening into summer alongside her evocations of young Charity's blossoming sexuality are beautifully written. Maybe this juxtaposition is a little obvious or even corny but it totally worked for me. Wharton's prose has always had an almost sensuous rhythm to it and it's never been put to better use than in this story of sexual awakening and first love.

The radical shift of tone in "Summer" is also remarkable. (Spoiler ahead.) There is a slight sense of foreboding from the beginning but for the most part you feel drawn in to the sweet romance of this lonely and impressionable girl. Then - BOOM - reality sets in, and a heart-tugging idyll turns into a horror story. The scenes toward the end, especially the trip up and down the mountain, are nothing short of gothic horror. Wharton had a pretty jaded view of the options women faced, and "Summer" is consistent with the bleak vision she first articulated in "The House of Mirth."

"Summer" is beautiful, shocking, and very sad.

There are several editions of "Summer." Purchase the Penguin edition with the Intro by Elizabeth Ammons. It's only a few bucks more and will give you added perspective on the book and Wharton.
riki
"Summer" is one of those books that you will think about for a long, long time. Set in the small village of North Dormer in New England, this story unfolds far from Wharton's more famous world of the Van der Luydens and the Mingotts. "Summer" has a little of the feel of "Ethan Frome", but is painted in brighter colors. Our protagonist Charity Royall is naive and unsophisticated, yet she can face facts and deal with the consequences of her actions. We feel as if the Fates have moved to New England and have woven for Charity on a future over which she has little control. The bright summer skies and flowers are overshadowed by the Mountain which broods in the distance, and the reader has a sense of foreboding about Charity's future as she develops her relationship with the sophisticated Lucius Harney. She yearns to develop herself to his level of social ability and breadth of knowledge, all the while knowing her limitations in breeding and background. The reader admires her despite her unattractive faults, such as her undervaluing of what her guardian has given her. Often she is cruel and thankless. The end was, I thought, satisfying: Wharton did not do to Charity what she did to Lily Bart in "House of Mirth", and Charity seems to have learned to be--well--more charitable.

I liked this book more than I liked "Ethan Frome", "Twilight Sleep", or "The Reef". While "Summer" may not be in the same class as "House of Mirth" or "Age of Innocence", it is I think comparable to "Glimpses of the Moon".
Andronrad
[Note: do not read the spoiler review by "George & Georgia Eliot" on this site before you read the book (I'm glad I didn't) since the reviewer reveals the plot line even in the title of the review. Hey, thanks a lot. Don't you know you're supposed to put "spoiler alert" on things like that?] As for SUMMER itself, it was a delightful surprise from Wharton. One of the few books in which she actually admits that her characters have sex (oh, my) and actually does it tastefully and in strict accordance with the characters' natures and the plot itself. The ending was a stunning surprise, and this from a huge Wharton fan, who found this book accidentally for the Kindle. Thank you, those who made this book available for free, but I would've paid to read this one. SUMMER is one of the best books Wharton ever wrote. Thumbs up on character development, irony, plot, dialogue, etc. Great read. 5*
Dead Samurai
Reading Edith Wharton is a deep pleasure and a privilege. "Summer" reminds one of her powers to perceive both the outer and inner world in all their richness and complexity, and to recreate them in her perfectly chosen words and rhythms.She is also a natural storyteller, weaving her spell and drawing us in: unveiling her struggling, imperfect characters in all their passion and humanity, while placing them in a poetic/realistic world which is exquisitely and convincingly rendered.Both Charity Royall and Lawyer Royall are deeply realized people, each caught in the web of his history and character, while life--and the passing wind of Lucius Harney-- shows them its
strength and bends them to what is meant to be. It is a magnificent and brave book, sexually unbridled, morally sophisticated, comprehending and empathetic. And can this woman write! I am so glad to have found it through Kindle.