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Author: Susan M. Griffin,Alan Nadel
ISBN: 0199764425
Subcategory: Humanities
Pages 288 pages
Publisher Oxford University Press; 1 edition (February 13, 2012)
Language English
Category: Other
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 394
ePUB size: 1132 kb
FB2 size: 1241 kb
DJVU size: 1554 kb
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eBook The Men Who Knew Too Much: Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock download

by Susan M. Griffin,Alan Nadel


Home Browse Books Book details, The Men Who Knew Too Much . It is no accident that there is no Alfred Hitchcock film based on a novel by Henry James. But reading James with Hitchcock is another matter.

Home Browse Books Book details, The Men Who Knew Too Much: Henry James and. The Men Who Knew Too Much: Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock. By Susan M. Griffin, Alan Nadel. Over a dozen major scholars and critics take up works by James and Hitchcock, in paired sets, to explore the often surprising ways that reading James helps us watch Hitchcock and what watching Hitchcock tells us about reading James. A matter of wit and a matter of serendipity, as a matter of fact.

What is there to know? The Men Who Knew Too Much innovatively pairs these two greats, showing them to be at once classic and contemporary.

Journal of American Studies of Turkey. The Men Who Knew Too Much will no doubt become required reading for scholars of both James and Hitchcock, but the originality and imagination with which literature and film are brought together here mean it deserves the attention of a much broader readership. Susan Griffin is a Distinguished University Scholar at the University of Louisville. Alan Nadel is William T. Bryan Chair in American Literature and Culture at the University of Kentucky.

Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock knew too much. Publication Date - February 2012. Self-imposed exiles fully in the know, they approached American and European society as inside-outsiders, a position that afforded them a kind of double vision. Masters of their arts, manipulators of their audiences, prescient and pathbreaking in their techniques, these demanding and meticulous artists fiercely defended authorial and directorial control. 288 pages Paperback 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches.

Two men, the one an architect and the other an archaeologist, met onthe steps of the great house at Prior's Park . Yes," replied Haddow, grimly.

Two men, the one an architect and the other an archaeologist, met onthe steps of the great house at Prior's Park; and their host, LordBulmer, in his breezy way, thought it natural to introduce them. Itmust be confessed that he was hazy as well as breezy, and had novery clear connection in his mind, beyond the sense that anarchitect and an archaeologist begin with the same series ofletters. An archaeologist is a man whostudies old things and finds they are ne. What is there to know? The Men Who Knew Too Much innovatively pairs these two greats, showing them to be at once classic and contemporary. Masters of their arts, manipulators of their audiences, prescient and pathbreaking in their techniques, these demanding and meticulous artists fiercely defended autho Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock knew too much.

Reading James with Hitchcock, reading Hitchcock with James, Susan Griffin and Alan Nadel National bodies, Susan Griffin Secrets, lies, and virtuous attachments : The ambassadors and The 39 steps, Brenda Austin-Smith Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock after the American century : circulation and non-return in The American scene and Strangers on a train, Brian T. Edwards Colonial discourse and the unheard other i. book below: (C) 2016-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners.

The Man Who Knew Too Much is a 1956 American suspense thriller film directed and produced by Alfred Hitchcock, starring James Stewart and Doris Day. The film is Hitchcock's second film using this title following his own 1934 film of the same name featuring a significantly different plot and script.

Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock knew too much. Self-imposed exiles fully in the know, they approached American and European society as inside-outsiders, a position that afforded them a kind of double vision. Masters of their arts, manipulators of their audiences, prescient and pathbreaking in their techniques, these demanding and meticulous artists fiercely defended authorial and directorial control. Their fictions and films are obsessed with knowledge and its powers: who knows what? What is there to know?The Men Who Knew Too Much innovatively pairs these two greats, showing them to be at once classic and contemporary. Over a dozen major scholars and critics take up works by James and Hitchcock, in paired sets, to explore the often surprising ways that reading James helps us watch Hitchcock and what watching Hitchcock tells us about reading James. A wide-range of approaches offer fresh insights about spectatorship, narrative structure, and cinematic representation, as well as the relationship between technology and art, the powers of silence, sensory-and sensational-experiences, the impact of cognition, and the uncertainty of interpretation. The essays explore the avowal and disavowal of familial bonds, as well as questions of Victorian convention, female agency, and male anxiety. And they fruitfully engage issues related to patriarchy, colonialism, national, transnational, and global identities. The capacious collection, with its brilliant insights and intellectual surprises, is equally compelling in its range and cogency for James readers and film theorists, for Hitchcock fans and James scholars.
Risa
This book was not what I expected, although it is as described. This would be great for an English class.
Umsida
This is a delightful example of what cultural theory is capable of when it gets away from the jargon and received ideas. From the inspired association of James and Hitchcock, the stylists, the difficult, the expatriated, the snobs with a secret love of the potboiler and the (more or less) straitlaced guys with a somewhat more open fondness for the perverse -- the talented authors here assembled for this anthology, let impressions, thoughts, even words-sounds themselves playfully and poetically lead them into charming and thought-provoking associations. Some mystique is preserved even as the art in question is elucidated. And no apologies are offered for placing film and literature on the same level, where they ought to be! Or, for that mater, upholding somewhat unfashionable notions that "genius" really does exist, and it makes its own exceptional patterns. It was always the job of cultural theorists, regardless of their political persuasion, to recognize such genius, so now in this touchy impasse-moment of "Who gets to decide?", I am praising this book because I think I understand the challenge it poses to the entrenched moment in academe: rather than emerging from overtaught, sodden lecture notes, already peer reviewed and rubber stamped, it is in fact composed in such a way that it will force intrepid professors to learn how to teach it, if they're up for that. My bet is that the extra demands placed on attention and mental self-searching will yield fascinating breakthroughs.