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Author: Talal Nizameddin
ISBN: 0312225385
Subcategory: Humanities
Pages 296 pages
Publisher Palgrave Macmillan; 1st edition (February 5, 2000)
Language English
Category: Other
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 984
ePUB size: 1774 kb
FB2 size: 1240 kb
DJVU size: 1200 kb
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eBook Russia and the Middle East: Towards a New Foreign Policy download

by Talal Nizameddin


Nizameddin's book looks at how a once cherished commitment to ideological goals and superpower rivalry with the United States was replaced, after 1991, with a pragmatic foreign policy based on national interest, epitomised by the appointment of Yevgenii Primakov - an expert on Iraq - a. .

Nizameddin's book looks at how a once cherished commitment to ideological goals and superpower rivalry with the United States was replaced, after 1991, with a pragmatic foreign policy based on national interest, epitomised by the appointment of Yevgenii Primakov - an expert on Iraq - as foreign minister.

this book is extremely useful for understanding Russian foreign policy toward the Middle East under Yeltsin. Talal Nizameddin is Lecturer in International Relations at Haigazian University, Beirut. Hardcover: 306 pages.

Talal Nizameddin's book looks at how a once cherished commitment to ideological goals and superpower rivalry with the United States was replaced, after 1991, with a pragmatic foreign policy based on national interest, epitomized by the appointment of Yevgeni Primakov-an.

Talal Nizameddin's book looks at how a once cherished commitment to ideological goals and superpower rivalry with the United States was replaced, after 1991, with a pragmatic foreign policy based on national interest, epitomized by the appointment of Yevgeni Primakov-an expert on Iraq-as foreign minister. Nizameddin examines Gorbachev's "new thinking," the foreign policy debates under President Yeltsin, the waning of Russian influence over the Palestinians and its consequent exclusion from the secret Oslo accords.

International Journal of Middle East Studies. In an outgrowth of his doctoral dissertation, Talal Nizameddin, now a lecturer at Haigazian University in Beirut, discusses the evolution of Russian foreign policy toward the Middle East under Boris Yeltsin from the collapse of the Soviet Union in December 1991 until 1997. The book, based in part on extensive interviews in Moscow, seeks to show how Russian policy evolved from what the author describes as the radical pro-West view of Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev in the early 1990s to the more nationalist view of Yevgeny Primakov in the mid- to late 1990s.

Talal Nizameddin, Russia and the Middle East: Towards a New Foreign Policy, St Martin's Press, 1999, p. 221–222; Vasiliev 22–23. Turkey joined NATO in 1952, in what Trenin calls a major coup for the West in the Cold War. Trenin 2018, p. 19. 5. The Soviet Union was the first country to recognize Israel, and Communist Czechoslovakia delivered much-needed arms to the Jewish forces.

His first book, Russia and the Middle East: Towards a New Foreign Policy, spanned the Yeltsin era .

His first book, Russia and the Middle East: Towards a New Foreign Policy, spanned the Yeltsin era and was published in 1999. He was formerly Lecturer in International Relations at Haigazian University, Beirut.

mixture of achievements and failures in both domestic and foreign policy".

He added that it was "hard to feel very sorry for Brezhnev"; his socio-economic policies had sent the country into an Era of Stagnation from which his successors were never able to fully recover. Talal Nizameddin states in his book Russia and the Middle East: Towards A New Foreign Policy that "Brezhnev's legacy, generally unaffected by his weak successors (Yuri. mixture of achievements and failures in both domestic and foreign policy". However, they argue that by the time of his death his failures had become severe chronic systematic problems.

Ideological goals and superpower rivalry with the US were replaced in post-Soviet Russian foreign policy towards the Middle East with a pragmatic approach based on national interest and epitomized by the appointment of Yevgenii Primakov, an expert on Iraq, as foreign minister. Nizameddin (internatio.

Talal Nizameddin has written a fascinating book on an important topic. His first book, Russia and the Middle East: Towards a New Foreign Policy, spanned the Yeltsin era and was published in 1999

Talal Nizameddin has written a fascinating book on an important topic. This is a most useful guide to anyone trying to understand Putin's overall strategy in the Middle East as well as providing some answers to those of us wondering why Russia continues to support the Assad regime in Syria. Mike Bowker, Senior Lecturer in Politics at the University of East Anglia, UK, and author of Russia, America and the Islamic World. His first book, Russia and the Middle East: Towards a New Foreign Policy, spanned the Yeltsin era and was published in 1999.

Nizameddin, in a book based on his doctoral dissertation at the University of London, has written a fine documentary survey on the contentious, complicated tug-of-war between competing cal factions that lie behind the making of R.

Nizameddin, in a book based on his doctoral dissertation at the University of London, has written a fine documentary survey on the contentious, complicated tug-of-war between competing cal factions that lie behind the making of Russian foreign policy in the 1990s, both in the Middle East and in general. Nizameddin lists five factions as having contributed to Russian foreign policy in the 1990s. He aptly details the ideological camps, ranging from pro-Western radicals to extreme nationalists, and shows how power ebbed and flowed depending on the mood in Russia at the moment.

The end of the Soviet Union precipitated a reassessment of Russia's foreign policy in many parts of the world, none more so than in the Middle East. Talal Nizameddin's book looks at how a once cherished commitment to ideological goals and superpower rivalry with the United States was replaced, after 1991, with a pragmatic foreign policy based on national interest, epitomized by the appointment of Yevgeni Primakov--an expert on Iraq--as foreign minister. Nizameddin examines Gorbachev's "new thinking," the foreign policy debates under President Yeltsin, the waning of Russian influence over the Palestinians and its consequent exclusion from the secret Oslo accords. Case studies of Russia's relations with Israel, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Turkey, and Iran provide a detailed up-to-date analysis of the region's wider diplomatic and strategic concerns. Extensive use is made of both Russian and Arabic language sources and of interviews with Russian and Arab leaders and officials, including Yassir Arafat and Andrei Kozyrev.